sewing technique

anonymous asked:

Heya, so I was wondering how exactly do you finish off the edge of a mouth on a toony suit? I haven't seen a single tutorial or guide explaining it anywhere. Do you sew the fur over the top of a glued lining? Or the other way around? Or get an extra piece of mouth fabric and make a lip? Or sew the two pieces together, slip it on the head and somehow glue it down?

I have only recently mastered this after … gosh, however many years I have been making costumes. It has taken a lot of research and development to get myself to this point. So I appreciate credit, but also sincerely hope y’all have a chance to chip in to my Patreon if you get the chance, it will continue to encourage my innovation and show me you appreciate these sort of replies – in a financially supportive way!


I pattern my fursuit heads to have a liner that is non-balaclava based. That means I build my foam head shapes first, hollow them as much as I can, and then tailor a liner to fit the interior. This liner I sew from quilted broadcloth, and then I use either lycra ironed to interfacing or anti-pill fleece for the mouth lining/eye lining(sometimes I add in lining for ear vent holes and the neck as well). For someone making their own head, you can make a tape pattern of half of the interior, mirror it, and then tailor a liner based off that.

Tip: Save that primary liner pattern, it generally can be revised for each new head for a custom fit. As you make more heads you get a better sense of what needs revised about it. I save almost all my patterns and revise them for use on future masks and it saves me a lot of time so I don’t have to repeat tasks from scratch, and I can learn more from it each time.

Here is the start of my liner – before I add ear vents and before I add the neck and mouth on – This is the general shape I have saved and tailor or revise for use in future heads.

When I get to the mouth – the part that was asked about! I carefully tape-pattern the desired mouth shape, it gets cut out with a very small margin since I hand-sew the fur to mouth (I will describe this a little later). Be sure to sew anything that needs sewn directly to the liner, including any other accessories – like teeth & tongue (they can also be marked out on the tape pattern)!

You can (sort of) see even the mouth corners are patterned in, too. Those are the triangular-looking extra pieces coming off the left and the right. This liner & teeth & velcro for the tongue is all machine-sewn up to this point.

The time I install the liner comes before I fur the mask. Its crucial! First I pin it in place as a “dry fit,” sometimes I do another revision step once I see it all together. Once finalized, then I start gluing down all the easy-to-glue loose edges (I use hot glue).

When I need to glue down an interior segment I cannot reach easily: I cut a small slice in the foamwork, fit the glue tip in to reach the liner, glue the liner through the slice and then squirt a bit more glue to close that slice in the foam right back up. When gluing down the mouth leave a margin of unglued area around the edges – those will be sewn.

This is the glued down interior. I have also cut openings for my eyes and very large ear vents (those are BIG but well-hidden in the “C” curve of my ear’s base, btw.)

Tape pattern the rest of your critter for your fur. Measure your pattern, order your fur, and when it arrives cut your pattern and sew it up however you wish. Leave the jaw separate from the face, it will be easier to attach to the liner.

Use a blanket stitch or similar to sew your jaw fur on! Matching thread color to fabric is important, as it may show.

The end result is very clean once turned right side out.You can see on my upper mouth where I left the edge unglued to instead be sewn. The top jaw and mouth corners, too, were sewn in this way.

You can also use this technique to sew the inside liners of ears or other areas that need a smooth edge but may call for separate treatment from the rest of the head. 

Happy crafting! For more costume tutorials, visit my website Matrices.net

Thirty-One Ways To Make Money With Tarot

Being a Tarot professional and hobbyist can be such a wonderful experience. For many, the exploration of Tarot is one of the best parts of their lives. Some Tarot users use divination as a means for a successful career. Some use it as a side income, while others enjoy Tarot because it is their passion. Tarot is a wonderful tool for people to connect with each other and provide services of enlightenment and understanding. But what if you don’t want to sell readings? What if Tarot reading is an introspective process for you? What if you are someone who isn’t comfortable reading Tarot for others or plain don’t like doing it? How will you make money then? In this post, I have provided thirty-one ways to make money with Tarot that isn’t offering Tarot readings.

Spread Creation Services

Do you like creating Tarot spreads for yourself or clients? If you have an online eCommerce shop, you can provide spread crafting services to other tarot readers or clients who may need help in formulating a Tarot spread of their own.

Deck Modification Services

If you are a fan and skilled in Tarot deck customization and modification, you can provide such a service to the Tarot and Divination communities. Some of these services may include removing borders off decks, edging decks with faux gilding, customizing card backs and fronts, etc.

Tarot Business Coaching

Sometimes as new tarot professionals starting out we could use some tailored guidance on our journey. One fantastic thing you can do to help other Tarot readers or upcoming Tarot professionals is to offer some form of business coaching. If you have been in this business for a significant amount of time, your voice, experience, and know-how can be very much sought after. Online webinars and one to one training seem to be popular in this line of work.

Teaching A Tarot Class, Workshop Or E-Course

Tarot is becoming much more accessible and more mainstream. Teaching a Tarot course or workshop is a fantastic way to help other Tarot readers on their journey. I have taught an introductory Tarot course at one of the metaphysical shops I have worked at previously and it was such a rewarding experience. You can also create an e-course that can be downloaded and followed through online means.

Books, E-Books, Zines

Your voice should be heard and what better way to share it than with a book. You can make money with Tarot by creating independently published books and ebooks be it through Blurb, CreateSpace, Amazon, etc. One of the most popular topics are how-to guides. You can also craft your own zine both hard copy and electronic ones and sell them online. Another very lucrative market in regards to selling books is having your books in audio book formats. Using services like Audible and Apple iTunes, or even selling your own packaged mp3 files through your e-commerce store can prove a great way to make money.

Guest Writing

Do you like writing about Tarot but aren’t ready to create a full book? Something you might want to consider is writing original blog posts and content for other bloggers or providing articles for sponsored tarot networks. The pay varies but it is a cool way to make money and get your name out there.

Sponsored Content

If you have a large social media following you can do promotional and sponsored written and video posts for deck publishing companies both large and independent. You can also write and record sponsored reviews of Tarot products, goods, and services.

Ads

Do you have a significant amount of followers on your social media platforms, Youtube, blog, and website? Something you can consider implementing is Google Adsense and tailored ads that you can run on those platforms. Running Adsense on your Youtube videos can get you money from advertisers who put ads before and after your videos.

Affiliate Programs

If you use sites like Amazon and Ebay you can sign up for their affiliate program. An affiliate program is when you share links to products and services like Tarot decks and deck bags with your following through the affiliate program links and if your following purchases that product through your specific link, you get paid a commission by the program because you brought them traffic and sales.

Being A Reseller

If you have a registered Tarot business, you can apply to be a deck and book reseller for various Tarot publishing companies. You essentially purchase products (decks, books, misc accessories) at wholesale pricing and resell them.

Deck Creation

Have you ever wanted to make your own Tarot deck? Creating and selling your very own Tarot deck can be a great way to share your creativity but also make money in the process.

Tarot Deck Artist And Illustrator

If you are an artist you can market your artistic ability and services to deck creators and publishing companies who are looking for artists to create Tarot decks.

Tarot Tattoo Artist

I know of some great tattoo artists who work solely on esoteric and tarot themed tattoos. This could be something to consider if you are interested in this line of work.

Sell Your Own Tarot Decks And Books

Do you have decks or Tarot books that you don’t use or want anymore? Are you trying to slim down your Tarot collection? A wonderful way to obtain some extra money is to sell your decks and Tarot books. You can sell unused and or out of print decks for higher rates.

Missing Card Services

Do you have a deck that is missing one or two cards? A great way to put a deck like that to use and help others is to sell individual cards of that deck for people to buy if they have also misplaced a card within that deck. If the deck is popular or one that is out of print, this can be another lucrative way to use something as simple as an incomplete deck to make some money.

Tarot Merchandise

Do you like to create your own Tarot inspired merchandise? Do you like making Tarot deck bags or cloths? Making and selling tarot inspired jewelry, clothing, deck bags, deck wallets, deck wraps, deck boxes, deck mats, deck cloths, t-shirts, hats, pins and other divination accessories can help make you a significant income. You can also offer custom pieces at much higher rates and even sell them through your own online e-commerce shop, fairs, and festivals or through local metaphysical shops.

Artisan Craft Templates

Do you have beautiful artisan designs that you are willing to share with other Tarot craft creators? You can provide paid video tutorials, and templates for your deck bags, tarot cloths, crochet and sewing deck bag techniques. You can also sell tips and tricks for your tarot inspired jewelry, etc.

Printables

Do you like creating tarot journal and planner pages? This can be a great way to help other tarot readers on their journey stay organized and implement tarot into their daily routine. You can create printable pages for a card of the day, week, and month posts, as well as journaling pages. You can also create and sell Tarot themed activity worksheets, Tarot business trackers, etc.

Private Tutorial

If you have no interest in creating and selling a large course but still want to provide a specific tutorial on a Tarot or divination topic, you can sell that tutorial.

Guided Meditations

Many of us have trouble relaxing or getting “into the zone” before a Tarot reading. Like audio books, you can also sell your Tarot and divination themed guided meditations to those who are interested in that type of meditation and relaxation resource.

Tarot Speaker

If you like to talk about Tarot, you may want to try giving talks about tarot at conventions, events and Tarot themed panels.

Photographer For Hire

Are you a photographer? Have a good camera? You can offer your photography services to Tarot businesses to take product shots, and tarot themed photography for their website or blog.

Writer For Hire

Are you proficient in copywriting services? You can offer your skills to those looking to better their web copy for their business, products, and services.

Social Media Marketer For Hire

Are you a social media marketer marvel? You can offer your services to Tarot businesses who want to better their social media platforms and drive more traffic to their business.

Graphic Designer And Web Designer For Hire

Are you a graphic artist or web designer who loves Tarot? You can offer your design services to Tarot businesses and professionals who need websites, landing pages, logos, header images, promotional graphics, and banners.

Subscription Services

If you are interested in offering monthly subscription services you can create a membership service on your own site or use websites like Patreon to supply your supporters with fresh Tarot themed content monthly. You can also use websites like cratejoy if you are interested in creating monthly subscription boxes that are Tarot themed. You can also create monthly subscription “communities” tailored to Tarot and your specific audience.

Mobile Tarot App

Are you proficient in creating mobile applications? You could create your own Tarot themed app and sell it on Apple and Android mobile marketplaces. You can also make additional income if your application has advertisements within it.

Paid Focus Groups

A focus group is when companies bring a diverse group of people together to talk about, discuss and try a product or service before it is released for feedback. The pay varies by company but it is a great way to make some money. I have been in two focus groups for Tarot applications in regards to their usability and ease of use.

Middle Man Mailing Service

For those who live in various parts of the world other than the United States, there are Tarot decks that come with large shipping fees. You can offer to purchase Tarot decks for others who live in a different part of the world or have a difficult time obtaining a certain deck because of their geological location and include a service fee and send them the deck at a much lower rate than they would have to pay if they purchased it directly.

Rent Out Your Space

Do you have a store front, office space or own your home? You can rent out your space for Tarot events and meet ups.

Virtual Assistant

Do you excel in helping other people’s businesses off the ground? You might want to consider offering virtual assistant services in helping Tarot readers and businesses who need an extra set of eyes and hands to help them run it.


Post Notes:
Please do not remove the captions.
Title: Thirty-One Ways To Make Money With Tarot
Copyright:  © Ivan Ambrose 2017
Disclaimer: The intention of this post is to share the various different ways I know of to make money with Tarot that are not Tarot readings.This isn’t the only way, the absolute right way or the way that you “should” approach this topic. I can only speak from personal experience and what I know about first hand. I encourage you to do your own research, to do what you are comfortable with and to tailor any advice provided henceforth to your specific needs and individual situation. Also please keep in mind that there are various different rules, regulations, and laws that precede your location, state, country in regards to many of these money making opportunities that may be different from my own. The services and websites mentioned in this post are not affiliated with Ivan Ambrose / TarotProse.com and are only used as examples. No professional or personal relationship should be assumed. I encourage and open up this conversation to added commentary to supplement this post of any kind.
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Hard At Work

Masterlist

Request - Can I have a Harry hook imagines where he goes to Aurodon with Uma & Gil and becomes like really shy and is like an sbo. Reader is really shy and doesn’t think he knows she exists (and thinks he likes Uma who is also really popular) but he’s been like in love with her since he first got there. Thank you so much your writing is my goals
Requested by - Anon
Tags - None
Word Count - 1, 708
Pairing - Harry Hook x Reader (Daughter of Snow White)
Warnings - Nope
Summary - I think I did this wrong because I made the reader the sbo, also I assumed sbo meant small business owner..You are best friends and share a business with Tiana and Naveen’s daughter, Tina. You like to keep to yourself mostly and don’t know how to talk to people. You think your life is perfect until he comes. Also, Will do a part 2 (The Date) upon request




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I’ve been preparing for a Ye Olde SCA campout this weekend.

My technique in sewing medieval clothes without a paper pattern is a little involved, but I like being able to make a garment and have it fit perfectly the first time I put it on, without having to do a fitting even one time.

How do I do this? Two programs - MakeHuman and Marvelous Designer

- I made a perfect 3D model of myself in MakeHuman by using my measurements and height, following this tutorial

- I imported the creepily perfect 3D model of myself into Marvelous Designer.

- I took medieval patterns from the internet, traced them, and resized them to fit the perfect 3D model of me. Like this t-tunic.

or more complicated clothes:

- Cut out the fabric using the same dimensions, adding a seam allowance

- sew it together (correctly the first time, not wasting fabric)

The first time I made a t-tunic, it went over my head and fit perfectly. I made a t-tunic for my brother using this technique, and he didn’t have to be involved in the process at all except for putting it over his head and it fitting perfectly. 

The hard part would be cutting out the fabric for more complicated clothes, but with ancient/custom clothing like this, you’d have to find a way to do that anyway. With this program, you know at least that it’s going to fit your beautiful body, and there’s less chance of wasting expensive linen..

I was actually using this technique to make custom 3D clothing to fit a Skyrim character (a much more difficult and painstaking process), but then realized that the skillset of making 3D model clothes could be applied to real life. And now all I want to do is invent my own weirdly perfect wizard fashion clothes, or even just make custom normal clothes that fit me weirdly perfectly.

I'd Love to See You Out of That Cosplay

Originally posted by crankyethans

Request: Hi. This is my first request so IDK for sure if I’m doing it correctly, but any chance you can make a part 2 to the ‘Falling’ in love one you made for Crankgameplays? It was really good.

Summary: This picks up where “‘Falling’ In Love” leaves off. Reader’s phone gets bombarded with notifications after Ethan tweets about her and they run into each other again ( ͡° ͜ʖ ͡° )

You can find part one here

A/N: Hey guys, sorry I didn’t post all day even though I said I would, I was social for once. Anyway here she is! As always anything in italics is usually the inner thoughts of a character. Hope you enjoy this one! I was super excited to write this and I’m pretty happy with the outcome!

Wordcount: 1094, bit longer than the first

Requests are open!

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youtube

Bra straps, bra hooks, and stays are parts of the Captain America costumes that keep the waist covered even in action scenes. Wendy Craig, Motion Pictures Costumers IATSE local 705 union member and Marvel Costume Department Supervisor describes the work involved from concept through filming to display.

https://youtu.be/PVuX5U19iEk

Motion Pictures Costumers IATSE has a Facebook page and this link was posted there.

WE DO knot ALWAYS LOVE YOU Part 16 Full Translation

The Ceremony

2

pages 169-179

Eight days since the evening the announcement of the nyuseki was made.

When Kurosaki Ichigo who had just finished afternoon classes returned home, the genkan entryway was filled with shoes of various sizes.

“They’ve already gathered here huh…… I’m home”

Removing his shoes, he headed towards the living room. As he reached his hand over the knob of the door to open it, in an instant, the door opened from the inside and Arisawa Tatsuki came flying out.

“Whoaa, watch out!”

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anonymous asked:

Can we have the egos work on making King a new cape?

Wilford tells Bim about a few scraps of fabric left over in the costume department, and when Trimmer pokes his head into the impossible closet of a thousand outfits, he finds a box shoved to the side full of different colored fabric and a few other odds and ends. There’s also a little fur lining left which he grabs up and takes with him to Oliver.

The android has spent the better part of the morning downloading different sewing techniques which he then employs to create the King a new cape from what Bim has gathered. It’s not solid red anymore, since there wasn’t enough red to go around, but the patchwork cape is better than none at all.

When they’ve finished it, Dr. Iplier wraps it with care, finishing off with a big red bow. They get the Host to inscribe the King’s full name on a card in perfect, golden calligraphy and leave the present outside of the Ego’s bedroom door at Peeble’s Place–bedroom being a loose term considering his entire room is a tree house.

King opens his little wooden door after hearing the knock and looks around but doesn’t see anyone. Then the flashy red bow catches his eye, and since the tag seems to be evidence enough that the gift is for him, King takes it inside and tears into the package.

He gasps when he sees the rainbow of color: red, yellow, green, and purple all lined with white fur and just a hint of sparkles. King swings it around and ties it around his neck with the silky red ribbon and goes to look at himself in the mirror.

Striking a pose that would rival that of King Arthur himself, King beams at his reflection and then runs off to find the others and thank them.

Sewing Club member Wonwoo!

Originally posted by i-wonwoo

A/N: I made that headcannon into an actual scenario. @svteenthings​ hi hello I had a secret writing blog the whole time. wink. all my works are bad tho trust me.

Genre: fluff

One longass scenario. wink.

  • So in your school, Wonwoo has a bad guy image, because people often mistake him as terrible/ scary because of his eyes
  • In reality he’s a good guy, but no one knows that except for the people who hang out with him
  • because they’re often considered bad/scary too
  • and recently Wonwoo developed interest in sewing, so he bought the basics, a sewing kit and fabric

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bluejaywriter replied to your post: bluejaywriter replied to your post: “Consider the…

I. LOVE. THIS. SO. MUCH. And after Isabel figures it out, Diana smirks for DAYS, and Isabel pretends to be affronted and says, “Well, you DID look ridiculous,” and Diana says, “And so did YOU, coming at me with those scissors,” and then they just giggle at each other because they’re so silly and happy and cute.

And Diana has a measure of talent for art already, because she has a little mini-sketch of Isabel looking equally ridiculous in her extra-long coat in the corner of a receipt or business card or whatever slip of paper she had in her pocket at the time. Isabel can never know, of course, because she’s as likely to burn it as she is to frame it.

(A few days later, Diana also teaches Isabel how to properly brandish a pair of scissors as a weapon, in case she should ever really need that knowledge.)

anonymous asked:

I'm currently having a dilemma were I feel like I'm "too late" to cosplay. As if, everyone who is already cosplaying has mastered it and become presentable, where as I'm just starting out and don't even light a candle to most of the crowd. I really adore everyones craftsmanship, and it's an incredible hobby to be apart of. But no matter how many tutorials I see I feel like I simply don't have the skill/talent to put together a cosplay, or as if I can't be a beginner. Has anyone been thru this?

Hello there!

Sorry that you feel that way about cosplay. It should be something fun, but if you feel inadequate, that can take away from it.

Know that it’s perfectly okay to be a beginner. Cosplay is a growing hobby, and people are getting into it all the time. There’s no shame in being new! I’d guess that the cosplayers who are relatively new at a con probably vastly outnumber those who have been doing it for 5+ years (who outnumber those of us who have been doing it 10+ years, etc.). Just remember that there’s a reason why you see so many “cosplay 101″ panels at cons, and why help sites like this one can exist: because so many people are getting into the hobby or looking for ways to get into the hobby that this kind of thing can be sustained.

The thing about skill is that it’s something that comes with practice. No one is amazing at something on their first try. It takes time and experience to get good at something, and it’s hard work. You can’t compare yourself to someone who has been cosplaying for a number of years and has more skills and more resources than you. Only compare yourself to your previous self. Did you learn how to make a new type of clothing, even if it’s not perfect? Great! Your next version will be better. Did you have a problem with something and it didn’t turn out? That can be discouraging, but you learned something from it, and now you can apply that knowledge to future projects. Reading tutorials will only get you so far. You have to actually do things.

Also, there’s no shame in starting small. You want to get into cosplay but can only do minimal sewing? Modify pre-made garments. This can also help you learn how things are constructed. Make simple outfits to begin with. Most complex costumes are just lots of simpler sewing techniques put together, and while this takes time to do, it can help to think of a more complex outfit as smaller pieces rather than as a big complex whole. Your first cosplay doesn’t have to be (and shouldn’t be!) a super elaborate hand-beaded Sakizou design, for example, or a full suit of armor. Learning how to make simple things so that they fit well and have clean construction will be much more useful and much more impressive in terms of construction than trying to tackle something far outside your skill level.

It also helps to take things slowly and set reasonable goals. Say you want to make a whole costume in a year. Set a goal so that you make the skirt one month, the bloomers another month, the top another month, and the accessories another month. Take your time with the items, and remake them if needed. Break down each piece into even smaller pieces – make your goal for that week to learn to sew a zipper, or learn to sew elastic, and then work your way up to the more complex princess seams on the top, and then the more complex boning in the top, and then the most complex item, such as a small bit of embroidery. Make mockups and practice pieces (I /still/ make practice pieces for new techniques) so that you can do the technique a few times before doing the final piece. Learning skills in small, manageable chunks will make it less overwhelming, and you’ll learn how to put things together in a practical way that can then be applied to a more complex outfit next time.

You can also enter a contest that has a beginner skill division. Ask for advice from the judges on how to improve. Attend a con in normal clothes or a storebought costume and see how you feel about that. Take some of the pressure off, and refocus a bit on other aspects of cosplay before tackling a project.

Also, keep in mind that a lot of what you see online and the viral images you see of cosplays are the “best” images – the most impressive construction, the best photography, and any “flaws” are often hidden in creative photography or photoshopped out, etc. (Of course, “best” is super subjective here, and there is no “best” way to cosplay, hence the quotes, but I think my meaning is clear.) The average cosplay at a con doesn’t look like that, certainly not while walking around the floor, and there are a lot of beginners around, or people who cosplay for reasons other than the construction, and there is nothing wrong with that. I’d actually recommend looking at con coverage photos and videos, or digging through the tags for local cons. You’ll often see photos here that are hall shots (not staged photoshoots), usually taken by fans of the series because they like the character, not because the cosplayer looks like they just stepped off a movie set. Look at photos and videos of crowds and gatherings. You’ll see a lot of cosplayers there of all skill levels – you’ll fit right in no matter what your costume looks like. 

And hey, a lot of attendees will see your costume and be amazed by it even if you only see flaws! People are often just excited to see their favorite characters, or don’t notice all of the tiny things that went “wrong” that you might.  

It can be hard to deal with feeling of inadequacy, but you’ll get to the level of skill you want to be at faster than you think if you continue to work at it. Here’s the secret: a lot of artists (cosplayers included) are hardest on their own work. Even someone like me, who has been cosplaying for nearly 15 years, deals with these feelings. The secret to overcoming it is not to look at other people’s work (”this person is at a way higher level than I am and they just started!” or “I’ll never make anything that amazing!”), but to look at how far you’ve come, and what you are proud of in your own work. I’m a pretty practical person, so if I ever do feel that kind of inadequacy, I usually stop, identify where I can improve, and set out to do those specific things. Even then, you will see your flaws, while others will see your strengths. Learn to identify your strengths and appreciate them, and work on the things that you see as flaws. Know that no one can do everything perfectly, and learn to embrace that.

I mention my own experiences here because you sound like the kind of cosplayer I am. I’m the type who has the most fun with the construction aspect of it, and has fun trying to plan out and problem solve a cosplay, and then showing off all my hard work. Not everyone places as much personal importance on those aspects of the hobby, so this kind of advice doesn’t really apply to those who have different versions of fun. This answer isn’t meant to be a “you have to have good construction to be a good cosplayer” response, but since you specifically want advice on construction skill, I would guess that you’re the type who likes to make things.  

You’ll get there, but remember that you are always allowed to be at the skill level you are at. Always.  

Fabrickind / Q&A Staff

Indigo Blue is at the center of this traditional Japanese Denim Brand founded by Ken-ichi Iwaya in 1997, in Kurashiki-city Okayama, Japan. Pure Blue Japan is the domestic trademark in Japan, while Syoaiya is the overseas trademark outside of Japan. Despite the trade name difference, all items are similarly put through a fully controlled manufacturing process in the same factory. Everything from the material, sawing, button kinds of parts, name tags, and to price tags are made and sold in the same manner. Pure Blue Japan tries to make something special out of every single one of their blue products. Their denims are of outstanding quality and the knowledge they the company has gathered over time is visible in the details off their raw jeans. Pure Blue Japan - Syoaiya like to stress the original indigo color made in fully controlled rope dyeing facility in Japan, unique touch and feel, and excellent sewing technique.

2

Made this little purse over the weekend. I didn’t expect it to be so cute! I really want to figure out how to turn it into more of a purse/messenger bag. I also learned how to sew a bow. They are kind of fiddly to make, but they are awfully adorable in the end.
Now of any good purse or bag tutorials or patterns, let me know. I am really enjoying learning new techniques.

Making a Moment (Part 2)

Summary: Dipper finds out he and Mabel might have FEELINGS for each other, so tries to set up a situation where a relationship could develop naturally. Problems arise.

[Part 1]

[AO3 Link]


Operation Mentor

Summary: One of them will ask the other to teach them something, and during the teaching process the instructor in question will assist the learner by taking their hands and demonstrating proper technique, and the contact combined with the sharing of an important passion will lead to a ‘Moment,’ finally.

Step 1: Figure out a skill to be taught

Dipper hadn’t always had the most confidence in himself and the things he’d defined himself by, and while he’d gotten better about it, code-breaking, physics problems, and biological anomalies weren’t skills you taught by sidling up behind someone and grabbing their hands. Even if they were, if Mabel had asked to know more about those things he’d likely start a full on lesson plan and forget the romance entirely.

So he had to learn from Mabel, and luckily most of Mabel’s proficiencies were craft related. He figured pottery was too on the nose, and she probably didn’t have a clay wheel in her dorm room anyway, but he had an in with his earlier agreement. Since he had promised to ‘help’ her with her clothing design, there was plenty opportunity to ask to learn some beginner knitting techniques. Frankly, it was a bit embarrassing that he was completely clueless about the practice when he had a sister who’d been making her own clothing since she was 8.

So, all he had to do was ask her how to knit, and then learn. Sounded simple enough.

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