sevenknotwind

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I think that this is something that is very important to talk about, Especially in the time that we are living in. Scale is important, I agree. It affects the overall experience of viewing the work, but that experience can only be felt in reality. Through digital means I feel as though size can be a set back in some cases. Maybe set back is the wrong term to use. I guess I mean it alters our interpretation. There is no opportunity to relate the space you’re occupying to the size of the artwork. The beautiful details shrink to a size that is barely noticeable.

I personally have noticed when I create larger works that they are definitely more striking in person when compared to my smaller works. When I share them in a digital space though they are often overlooked. The time spent does not translate to this realm of viewing. The pieces get the same amount of attention as smaller works. In most cases less attention. The digital space seems to level the playing field between small and large works. This is something that I find very interesting.

This question came from a conversation I was having with antropomorfisme. We were discussing size when it comes to art, specifically the fact that I tend to work in a smaller scale. He said,

“I saw that you mostly work in smaller scales. It’s kinda special, actually. It gives you a kind of authenticity, in a way. I also don’t know why people tend to like, or even expect artworks that are larger. But I must admit that I’m not different! It’s something that’s indoctrinated in this society, in the people’s minds. The ‘being able to put in a museum’-size tends to be more ‘attractive’. It seems to have a credibility of sorts.“

I feel that what he’s saying brings up another interesting question. Is scale a part of the public’s overall perception of what “good” art is? Can scale make or break the interpretation of a given piece of art?

Now for a tangent.

This discussion reminds me of the movie Synecdoche, New York. It’s a great movie that you all should see if you haven’t already. In the movie Caden Cotard’s (Philip Seymour Hoffman) wife, Adele Lack (Catherine Keener) is a painter. She works in an extremely small scale. I was very impressed by this when I saw the movie. She went the opposite direction. She scaled everything down to bring the viewer in.

I just read an article that states…

“Adele’s paintings are minuscule portraits that resemble tiny Lucian Freuds. They are so small that one must wear magnifying glasses to view them and she ships them in miniature crates that look as if they were made for a dollhouse. It’s a visual joke that counters the heroic, macho scale adopted by many New York painters, but the actual work is nothing special, and their size ultimately boils down to a marketing gimmick.“

I don’t think the author of the article was aware of the fact that the paintings were actually by a very talented artist named Alex Kanevsky, and saying they’re “nothing special” honestly infuriates me.

Thank you all for the replies/comments!

The Artists on Tumblr List is aimed at creating even more access to artists using this platform. You WANT to support your fellow artists by following, liking, and reblogging their art. I’ve made it easy for you to find them, now you just gotta click!

What is absolutely wonderful about this initial group of 10 individuals - is that they are all the first artists I followed on Tumblr three years ago. 

1. angrywhistler - “Self taught artist from Redwood City, California currently living on the Island of Hawaii.” (x)

2. lisasolberg - “An expressionistic painter and installation artist in Los Angeles.” (x)

3. annctart - “Her style sees influences in expressionism, neo-expressionism, actionism and surrealsim, the latest more in her prose accompany Ann’s work in most of her exhibitions. Prior to relocating to New Zealand, Ann has worked as a biochemist and biotechnologist for an international pharmaceutical company, the last two years as a Lean/Kaizen specialist and project manager.” (x)

4. paulbaileyart - “The farming landscape which surrounds my home has been my predominant source of inspiration over the past couple of years: low rolling hills; intermittent woodland; ancient hedgerows; patch-work fields and vast skies. The semi-abstract nature of my work, my use of non-traditional techniques, my bold compositions and my dynamic use of colour help portray this seemingly prosaic landscape in a new, vivid and surprising way.” (x)

5. laurafabrellas - photography

6. tchmo - “I mash things up.” (x)

7. lucasbeaufort - “I’m a real skate rat. I love to spend time watching stuff on Internet. There are so many things today, not easy to stay on top.
I’m pretty nostalgic of the 90s. When a skate video came out it was crazy. I guess that what emerges from my art comes from the 90s.” (x

8. nellallen - Multi-media artist/painting

9. christian-hetzel - “My work focuses on texture and abstract color(-field) compositions. Most based on traditional media and techniques, such as canvas, paper, timber board, painted with acrylic and mixed media. Besides this, I create also intermedial artworks, this means analog paintings are used for digital modifying process to create a total new artwork.” (x)

10.  sevenknotwind / kevin-townsend - “I am driven by issues surrounding memory, its formation, storage and subsequent degradation over time. I am consumed with thoughts regarding the ways in which we are marked by time and the way that memory becomes the architecture of our identity.” (x

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