seven eight

sorry, this is just a quick note about how much percy jackson means to me~

when i first started reading the lightning thief, i was eight years old. i was instantly hooked. me and my three best friends would play percy jackson at recess (i was always a daughter of aphrodite…hopeless romantic from day one). with each new book, percy aged a year and so did i. it was special, growing up with him. while everyone else stopped reading the books, set them aside because they were too “childish,” i stayed home and read them. i stopped playing percy jackson and started writing fanfiction instead. i grew up reading about him, read as he grew and changed and growing and changing with him. it’s been a seven year journey. the eight year old me who first picked up the lightning thief has evolved into fifteen year old me, older and wiser and different. i truly believe the books helped shape me as i left childhood. so all i can say now?

thank you.

the thought of mccree getting an animated short possibly in the future makes me so excited?? like… it’s hard to explain, i want to see this character emote and move and talk in all his fully-animated glory, i haven’t lived a full life until i do

Meryl Streep’s Acceptance Speech for her Cecil B. DeMille Award in the Golden Globes

Please sit down. Thank you. I love you all. You’ll have to forgive me. I’ve lost my voice in screaming and lamentation this weekend. And I have lost my mind sometime earlier this year, so I have to read.

Thank you, Hollywood Foreign Press. Just to pick up on what Hugh Laurie said: You and all of us in this room really belong to the most vilified segments in American society right now. Think about it: Hollywood, foreigners and the press.

But who are we, and what is Hollywood anyway? It’s just a bunch of people from other places. I was born and raised and educated in the public schools of New Jersey. Viola was born in a sharecropper’s cabin in South Carolina, came up in Central Falls, Rhode Island; Sarah Paulson was born in Florida, raised by a single mom in Brooklyn. Sarah Jessica Parker was one of seven or eight kids in Ohio. Amy Adams was born in Vicenza, Italy. And Natalie Portman was born in Jerusalem. Where are their birth certificates? And the beautiful Ruth Negga was born in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, raised in London — no, in Ireland I do believe, and she’s here nominated for playing a girl in small-town Virginia.

Ryan Gosling, like all of the nicest people, is Canadian, and Dev Patel was born in Kenya, raised in London, and is here playing an Indian raised in Tasmania. So Hollywood is crawling with outsiders and foreigners. And if we kick them all out you’ll have nothing to watch but football and mixed martial arts, which are not the arts.

They gave me three seconds to say this, so: An actor’s only job is to enter the lives of people who are different from us, and let you feel what that feels like. And there were many, many, many powerful performances this year that did exactly that. Breathtaking, compassionate work.

But there was one performance this year that stunned me. It sank its hooks in my heart. Not because it was good; there was nothing good about it. But it was effective and it did its job. It made its intended audience laugh, and show their teeth. It was that moment when the person asking to sit in the most respected seat in our country imitated a disabled reporter. Someone he outranked in privilege, power and the capacity to fight back. It kind of broke my heart when I saw it, and I still can’t get it out of my head, because it wasn’t in a movie. It was real life. And this instinct to humiliate, when it’s modeled by someone in the public platform, by someone powerful, it filters down into everybody’s life, because it kinda gives permission for other people to do the same thing. Disrespect invites disrespect, violence incites violence. And when the powerful use their position to bully others we all lose. O.K., go on with it.

O.K., this brings me to the press. We need the principled press to hold power to account, to call him on the carpet for every outrage. That’s why our founders enshrined the press and its freedoms in the Constitution. So I only ask the famously well-heeled Hollywood Foreign Press and all of us in our community to join me in supporting the Committee to Protect Journalists, because we’re gonna need them going forward, and they’ll need us to safeguard the truth.

One more thing: Once, when I was standing around on the set one day, whining about something — you know we were gonna work through supper or the long hours or whatever, Tommy Lee Jones said to me, “Isn’t it such a privilege, Meryl, just to be an actor?” Yeah, it is, and we have to remind each other of the privilege and the responsibility of the act of empathy. We should all be proud of the work Hollywood honors here tonight.

As my friend, the dear departed Princess Leia, said to me once, take your broken heart, make it into art.

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I love Meryl Streep even more now, somehow.

Transcript:

“I love you all. You’ll have to forgive me. I’ve lost my voice in screaming and lamentation this weekend. And I have lost my mind sometime earlier this year. So I have to read. Thank you, Hollywood Foreign Press [Association]. Just to pick up on what Hugh Laurie said, you and all of us in this room, really, belong to the most vilified segments in American society right now. Think about it. Hollywood, foreigners, and the press. But who are we? And, you know, what is Hollywood anyway? It’s just a bunch of people from other places. I was born and raised and created in the public schools of New Jersey. Viola [Davis] was born in a sharecropper’s cabin in South Carolina, grew up in Central Falls, Long Island. Sarah Paulson was raised by a single mom in Brooklyn. Sarah Jessica Parker was one of seven or eight kids from Ohio. Amy Adams was born in Italy. Natalie Portman was born in Jerusalem. Where are their birth certificates? And the beautiful Ruth Negga was born in Ethiopia, raised in— no, in Ireland, I do believe. And she’s here, nominated for playing a small town girl from Virginia. Ryan Gosling, like all the nicest people, is Canadian. And Dev Patel was born in Kenya, raised in London, is here for playing an Indian raised in Tasmania. Hollywood is crawling with outsiders and foreigners. If you kick ‘em all out, you’ll have nothing to watch but football and mixed martial arts, which are not the arts.

They gave me three seconds to say this. An actor’s only job is to enter the lives of people who are different from us and let you feel what that feels like. And there were many, many, many powerful performances this year that did exactly that — breathtaking, passionate work. There was one performance this year that stunned me. It sank its hooks in my heart — not because it was good. There was nothing good about it. But it was effective and it did its job. It made its intended audience laugh and show their teeth. It was that moment when the person asking to sit in the most respected seat in our country imitated a disabled reporter, someone he outranked in privilege, power, and the capacity to fight back. It kind of broke my heart when I saw it. I still can’t get it out of my head because it wasn’t in a movie. It was real life. And this instinct to humiliate, when it’s modeled by someone in the public platform, by someone powerful, it filters down into everybody’s life, because it kind of gives permission for other people to do the same thing. Disrespect invites disrespect. Violence incites violence. And when the powerful use their position to bully others, we all lose.

This brings me to the press. We need the principled press to hold power to account, to call them on the carpet for every outrage. That’s why our founders enshrined the press and its freedoms in our constitution. So I only ask the famously well-heeled Hollywood Foreign Press and all of us in our community to join me in supporting the committee to protect journalists. Because we’re going to need them going forward. And they’ll need us to safeguard the truth.

One more thing: Once, when I was standing around on the set one day whining about something, we were going to work through supper, or the long hours or whatever, Tommy Lee Jones said to me, “Isn’t it such a privilege, Meryl, just to be an actor?” Yeah, it is. And we have to remind each other of the privilege and the responsibility of the act of empathy. We should all be very proud of the work Hollywood honors here tonight. As my friend, the dear departed Princess Leia said to me once, “Take your broken heart, make it into art.” Thank you.”

@captioned-miscellaneous-videos

Enneagram Portraits

PORTRAIT ONE

There is a sense in which these people were good little boys and girls who learned to behave properly. And because their natural desires were forbidden when young, they rarely ask now what they want from life. Instead, they focus on what they perceive to be the correct thing to do.

They will be familiar with feelings of guilt, for there is within them a strong inner critic. This critic rarely gives them a break. It often tells them what they could have done better, but rarely tells them what they have done well.

It is hard for Ones not to pass on this critical attitude to others, and they can become a rather judgmental presence. ‘Ought’ and 'should’ may well be significant words for a One. They have a clear sense of how things should be done, and tend to want others to do it in that way.

Anger is felt to be a bad emotion by these people, so they do not wish to express it. They do not react well to anger, either theirs or that of others. Within themselves, they work to keep it from view, hidden safely 'below stairs’.

When asked if they are angry, they will probably say no. If Ones do get angry, they feel bad afterwards, until able to rationalise it away.

Ones are concerned with how others perceive them. They are anxious to be seen to be doing the right thing and worry about this. There may also be lingering resentment about others not doing the right thing.

Homecoming and delight arrive for these people when their turbulent inner life and active outer life merge in a harmonising pool of self-acceptance. It is a place where no one condemns them. They feel entirely held by the water and know nothing but their own worth.

The energy and clarity of Ones makes them great reformers in their different walks of life. Their integrity and passion for truth make them truly inspiring. But to be free, they must leave behind guilt and shame, and learn to see the sweet perfection in all things - including themselves.

PORTRAIT TWO

These people are seen as life’s carers. They love to be in contact with others, to help others, and to some, they look like saints - busy saving everyone.

As their sense of self is found mainly in external value, Twos move outwards, towards people, with remarkable energy. They may find it harder to find value in themselves, however.

It is hard for Twos to face their own needs. They were perhaps their mum and dad’s little helper. They felt such help won them approval, and as adults, they both need and seek this approval still. They display a strong desire to be needed, and work to create dependence.

Because they have little sense of inner belonging, these people can become clingy in their need to belong in the world. In particular, they crave the approval of those they regard as important.

They are adept at flattery, knowing instinctively what people want to hear, and tend to merge with a strong leader. They are able to lead, but are much more comfortable as a power behind the throne.

Pride is an issue, as they impose their caring will on situations. They rescue people - but such rescue is not offered freely. Twos look for a sense of gratitude and dependence in the helped, and resentment is felt if this is not forthcoming. They can be angry and aggressive in such circumstances.

They tend not to seek mutual relationships but dependent ones. Like a cat, Twos can display both affection and extreme independence. They don’t seek the help of others - just their admiration.

Homecoming and merriment come to Twos when they give up the self-image of saviour and dare to approach their own needy selves. They fear there is nothing within, yet they will find so much - a strength and beauty they never believed possible.

The compassion and generosity of Twos will always draw in outsiders. Their challenge is to do this with humility and freedom - and without manipulation.

When they realise they can save no one but themselves, they can truly save the world.

PORTRAIT THREE

These people like to be active, and are often perceived as successful. They tend to be seen as effortless achievers in their chosen spheres and possess a competitive edge.

They also possess a deep fear of failure and put much energy into avoiding it. Threes are skilled at succeeding, but often at great cost to themselves.

There is a schism between their performing self and their real self. They are attracted by the heart, but to go there seems a journey too far - so they stay active and busy instead; it drowns the pain.

Their background may reveal someone who valued them only for their achievements. The ambition of another is absorbed by them and becomes their own - a false self they carry into adult life. It proves a joyless taskmaster, however.

Threes instinctively find the right image and effective means of self-presentation in order to further their ambitions. Friends can become little more than those who serve the Three’s self-image and may find themselves dropped if they no longer do this. These people have little sense of self-worth beyond that of achievement. They just wish to stay ahead of the rest. To this end, deceiving themselves, as well as others, can become a way of life.

Feelings are not welcome in this life-script, and no space is allowed for them. If feelings appear, they provoke great anger or sadness, and disable Threes quite seriously. There can be an inner crisis when activity stops.

Homecoming and hope come to Threes when they discover their world doesn’t collapse if they are truthful to themselves and others; when they find that, they can fail and still be loved.

Adaptable, energetic, practical, they can lead and inspire in remarkable ways. But they must realise the pursuit of success is not the same as the pursuit of wholeness. Then they can soar like a caged eagle set free.

PORTRAIT FOUR

These people live with a sense of both beauty and abandonment. There is within them the sense that something-is missing from life. It is important they feel special as an adult, for they did not feel special when young. Certainly, they do not wish to be ordinary, and struggle with the common things of life.

There is often a sense of style in the way Fours do things. They tend to be creative people, whether laying a table or choosing clothes.

Beneath the surface is a melancholic sense of tragedy. Their feelings are up and down, and Fours remain acutely aware of any perceived rejection or sense of being misunderstood. Any hint of abandonment brings deep pain.

Yet, in a strange manner, they invite it. They may talk of a desire for a deep relationship, but tend to push it away if it comes too close. They are frequently negative to what is close, and positive towards the unobtainable and far away.

Their envy of others grows from an inability to love themselves and what they have. Everything within reach is unsatisfying. They feel the present is not quite real, but the future may be, in some golden and loved way.

In the face of their swirling inner emotions, these people can become controlling. Unable to control their inner environment, they desperately try to impose order beyond.

Fours as they connect with their beautiful origins. They can then begin to relate to people, not through sadness but through a sense of their own worth.

Their challenge is to live in the present, to leave behind their grandiose mourning. If only they can do so, they will bring style, awareness and deep creativity to everything they touch.

PORTRAIT FIVE

These people drift towards the corner, wishing to hide themselves. They tend to be quiet loners and unemotional.

They are inclined to pause before they speak, and choose their words carefully when they do. They know what they think, but find it hard to state what they feel.

They may stockpile knowledge of some sort, for fear of inner emptiness, and in order to help them in the world. Knowledge is their weapon in a world perceived by them to be hostile. If they can know more than others around them, they may just be OK.

These people tend to be observers, trying to understand the world before taking part. Some Fives never get round to taking part, however, lacking both the energy and social skills to connect with others.

They are stingy with the time they offer relationships. Life is compartmentalised to keep the contradictions at bay; every commitment has a box, and every box a time limit.

Fives may be experts in particular areas of knowledge, large or small, but they are frightened. In a heated situation, their first step is always back, and they fear spontaneous confrontation.

They struggle to be present to anything, delaying emotional response until after the event, when they are alone. Fearful Fives greatly value self-control and seek predictability, wishing to know what will happen and when.

They gain strength from solitude - but need be aware of when solitude becomes isolation.

Homecoming and engagement come to Fives when they submit to instinctive action, and say 'Yes’ to the emotional flow of the world around them. Perhaps they became adults too early. It is time for them to play again.

Challenged to step beyond their own small constructs, Fives can step happily onto the public stage and bring gifts of understanding, focus, clarity and wit.

PORTRAIT SIX

These people are much concerned with issues of trust, security and authority. The big question for them is: what or who will bring me security?

They have mixed feelings about authority. In one sense, they gave up trusting it a long time ago. Yet neither do they trust themselves. They look elsewhere for identity, and their desperate search for someone or something to trust does not always result in good choices.

They have powerful imaginations, with a tendency towards a paranoid version of reality. They constantly scour the horizon for danger in order to be prepared. Sixes either plunge recklessly at what they fear, or run away.

These people are very aware of rules, of norms, and have no desire to be regarded as deviant. They tend to be loyal to the institutions they are part of, and submissive followers if a leader is found.

They may be little bigots in their own quiet way, overly sure of their opinions; and they tend to create baddies and heroes in their relationships. They are instinctive supporters of the underdog, perceiving themselves in that role.

Dominated by their head, internal debates can go round and round inside a Six, paralysing their decision-making. These are fearful people - and, fearful of making a bad decision, they can end up making no decision at all.

Homecoming and wholeness come to Sixes when a trust in themselves replaces an apprehensive conformity to authority. Instead of valuing the values of others, they grow to value their own. They must find their own voice, for it is a good voice. Rooted in their own inner strength, they will reveal the humorous, engaging, confident, loyal and assured people they are.

PORTRAIT SEVEN

These people are always looking to the future. They are instinctive planners, working to keep options open and escape routes clear, with a deep fear of being bored. With plots, maps and back-up plans, their life-script is one of uneasy activity, like that of a colourful but restless butterfly. They seek out social contact - but remain individualists in all settings.

Sevens often smile - but the smile does not always reach their eyes, which may reveal fear. Their defence mechanism is often a mind-circus of thinking, associated ideas populating their brains like monkeys swinging through trees. They love their mind - and often confuse it with genuine emotion.

These people often bring optimism to situations. Under stress, however, they can lose their natural optimism and acquire instead a critical and carping attitude towards others. There is negativity close to the charming surface of Sevens.

Sevens are head rather than heart people. Genuine emotion can be hard for them - either to recognise or participate in. They plan to avoid such things, with a natural inclination to keep things light and on the surface.

But a persistent feeling of alienation can leave these sociable souls wondering whether they are loved in this world - for true connection always seems denied them.

To compensate, they seek a variety of experience, greedy always for the new. Pain and sadness are what they most fiercely reject; they will do anything in their power to avoid these.

Sevens know how to get to places - but not always what to do when they have arrived. They prefer a feast of many adventures to the deep experience of just one.

Homecoming and peace come for Sevens when they allow themselves to be touched by the sheer depth of existence. They become aware that to run towards pleasure is not necessarily to run away from pain. They learn to live in the honest moment, with level-headed calm.

They will always possess a butterfly quality, colourfully touching many things. But at their best this becomes a joyous dance, a celebration of goodness and beauty, while also accepting that existence brings pain.

PORTRAIT EIGHT

These people take pride in their power and strength, and if they are not in charge, they will take on the one who is. Life is warfare, so it is best to hit hard and hit first. They believe that everyone needs testing, and that truth comes out in a fight.

The talk style of Eights is to make others hear and understand what they want to say, and can be more a monologue than dialogue. Natural leaders, these people enjoy using their strength.

In their better moments, they use their vibrancy and daring on behalf of the weak. In their less good moments, they use it to build their own kingdom. They have a great lust for life with all its tastes and experiences. Consequently, they can feel constrained by society’s rules.

They live by confrontation, and when there is none, they may need to create it. They seek to pull down all those who have power. They might call this 'the pursuit of justice’, but it may equally be about vengeance or getting even.

Beneath the surface of the Eight, though perhaps strongly denied, is guilt and self-blame. They despise weakness in others, just as they cannot face it in themselves. Eights seek to control people rather than relate to them.

Homecoming and healing come for Eights when they discover their own innocence, and grow to seek truth in engagement rather than battle. Then, the great force of Eights can be used on behalf of others.

Compassion replaces domination as the guiding principle. Friendship rather than competition fills their great heart. Seeing the harmony in the world, their strength becomes the beautiful power of gentleness.

PORTRAIT NINE

These people feel happiest amid peace and unity. Conflict is the last thing they wish to face. Nines tend to present a calm demeanour, and may be considered easy-going by some people. But beneath the surface is a stubborn streak, and they will do nothing they do not wish to.

Nines are the queens and kings of self-forgetfulness, sacrificing their own identity in order to accommodate the attitudes of those around. Sensing they were beyond the reach of goodness, they fell asleep to themselves long ago.

They turn now from real wishes to small comforts and substitutes for love. They can inhabit the lives of others just as enjoyably as they can inhabit their own.

These people fear conflict. They prefer to say 'yes’ even if they mean 'no’ - if it means they do not have to grasp the nettle. As leaders, they are at their best when there are no decisions to be taken. There is a tendency towards the unfocused use of time, and they can be easily diverted by the non-essential.

With little sense of their own self-worth, like a dry sponge in water, they absorb praise or attention. Some Nines develop an elaborate and posturing self-importance as a bolster to poor self-esteem.

Anger is Nine’s primary issue, but is repressed, and usually expressed in passive ways - through catty remarks, a depressed or surly attitude or just plain laziness and sloth. Just occasionally, the anger may come to the surface and explode terribly.

They are attracted to the familiar and the old, and fear the learning of new tricks.

Homecoming and happiness come to Nines when they wake up to their own value, their own deep goodness. They leave the lethargic pit of self-abasement and take their authentic, individual place in the world. They become the strong reconcilers and mediators they were born to be. Like no other number, Nines can hold the world in their big arms - arms of deep and knowing love.

Hetalia family headcanons
  • UsUk: The love-hate family. Tosses insults over the table at dinner but will 100% cuddle afterwards.
  • RusAme: The cosy family. Always ready to serve you hot chocolate or iced tea.
  • FrUK: The quiet family. Francis is cooking, Arthur is doing embroidery, and there's most likely an argument over who plays the music.
  • Spamano: The opposite of FrUK. Loud voices and Spanish music can be heard at all hours.
  • Gerpan: The animal loving family. Adopted seven stray dogs and eight cats, and feeds the birds every morning.
  • AusHun: The musical family. There is a musical instrument in every room. There are symphonies played every night. The neighbors hate them.
  • PruAus: The conflicted-music family. Gil will play rock music just to annoy Roderich in the morning, and in return will be awoken at 2am with Mozart. The neighbors hate them more.
  • PruHun: The I-hate-your-guts-but-love-you family. Gets into fights constantly, but in the end both still love each other to the moon and back.
  • Rochu: The hermit family. Would prefer to cuddle and read together instead of having to go outside.
  • Ameripan: The nerdy family. Are constantly late to things because they were playing video games together.
  • GerIta: The loving family. Love each other. Love the dogs. Love the neighbors. Love the house. Love the sun. Love.
  • PruCan: The friendly family. Makes pancakes and cakes for the neighbors, will go to every social gathering together just to be nice.
  • AmeCan: The cuddling family. So many cuddles. So. Many. People wonder how they get anything done.
  • Franada: The cooking family. House always smells of cinnamon, vanilla and sugar. Anyone who walks past could be victim to being invited inside and stuffed with baked goods.
  • Amestralia: The sporty family. Constant games of football and rugby outside, with high stakes for the winner.

Kisame: Distanced himself from comrades, worked alone (even when in a group), slaughtered fellow villagers, likened himself to a solitary killer, had no permanent ties, no family, no lovers, famously avoidant and cagey

Obito: *Appears*

Kisame: Why yes I would love to devote my life to you. Every breath. I’m all yours.

The next time Grandpa grumbles about having to walk uphill to school every day, whip out this pic and show his ass what “uphill” truly looks like.

What you’re seeing above is the single route to get to Atuler, a clifftop village in southwest China. What you’re also seeing is children as young as six years old making the nearly half-mile ascent home via treacherous paths and that rickety-ass wooden ladder. It’s as scary as it looks; a reporter dispatched to the village reportedly burst into hysterical tears while attempting the climb (admittedly, tears are one of several liquids we’d burst into, were we to try). Meanwhile, the village’s schoolchildren regularly and fearlessly pull off this 90-minute reenactment of Cliffhanger, with heavy book bags in place of Stallone’s weighty pecs.

Atuler is home to a mere 72 families, most of whom make their living farming chili peppers. Though by the villagers’ own tally, they’ve “only” tragically lost seven or eight of their number to the murderous, greedy hand of gravity, many more have been horrifically injured by falls, and this combined with recent media attention spurred the Chinese government to make the climb safer. They did so by replacing the homemade (and oft-rotted) wooden ladder with a much sturdier (but equally terrifying) metal one, because no one ever said that safety couldn’t be accompanied by shitted pants.

The 6 Most Terrifying Morning Commutes In The World