settler

btw for the people still worried about andromeda being a “colonialism simulator” (spoilers):

- the planets chosen were believed to be uninhabited 600 years ago (but there was extensive first contact protocol written in the extreme unlikelihood they’d meet another sapient species)

- you cannot colonise the angaran homeworld (havarl) or any sovereign angaran planet (aya, voeld). you can be invited to leave a small contingent of scientists (to study the vault’s effects on havarl to help make it viable for the angara again) or set up a base that works alongside the angara (running ice on voeld for both initiative and angaran settlements).

- the angara are also invited to the nexus and appear in colonies on shared planets such as kadara.

- there are no other sapient species in the system, aside from the kett who are invaders, not natives or settlers. you cannot displace anyone, invade anyone, make yourself at home anywhere you are not welcome.

- you can even give a random civilian who suggests settling on aya uninvited a dressing down for being disrespectful

just so you can avoid alarmism and false info. ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

If you’re not actively working with Indigenous people in your organizing, and centering Indigenous people in leadership roles, esp the people whose lands ur on, Indigenous people with disabilities, and Two-Spirit/Indigenx/Muxe/LGBTQIA+ Indigenous people, then ur activism is staying at the level of active collusion with settler-colonial rhetoric and violence.

If you ever feel bad about your job performance remember that for all 8 years of his presidency George Washington had to write his constitutional responsibilities on the palm of his hand and frequently checked it during cabinet meetings.

Fascism hasn’t come from working class poverty or oppression. That’s a deliberate capitalist intellectual confusion we have to get rid of. The oppression that colonial workers had to endure in Asia, Afrika, Latin America and the Mideast didn’t produce fascism but hopeful, radical left movements of liberation that might have been ultimately subverted, but that also contained the constructive efforts of hundreds of millions of ordinary working people. Centuries of lynchings and police state terror and colonial poverty here in the Black Nation never produced anything like fascism, until neo-colonialism and what Malcolm X called “dollarism” took over. New Afrikan colonial oppression produced so many who were internationalist and forward looking, conscious anti-capitalists with integrity and democratic values. That really represented the historic Black Nation. A people that, however poor, however held low, were predominately working class and at the productive heart of the u.s. empire. A working class culture that had a lived belief in the importance of justice for everyone.

So don’t be thinking that fascism just comes from poverty or recession, because it’s not that way at all. In Euro-America – by far the weathiest nation that’s ever existed since Babylon in biblical times – the growth of white fascism has nothing to do with poverty but everything to do with the crisis of white settlerism.
—  “The Shock of Recognition” by J. Sakai

A war on Gaza right now would be the ideal cover up for Israel to use for its annexation plans in the West Bank. Tonight Israel is trying pass a bill annexing Israeli settlements, a bill that the international body opposes. In other words Israel wants these illegal settlements to be part of ‘Israel proper’ and isn’t going to withdraw from them with any future peace deal.

111516 – last week was rough. in light of the election: stay safe, keep your head up, look out for yourself & your people. remember difficulty is finite.
good things that happened last week: the shows were a big success, made some wonderful new friends, & the ice cream shop i work at has pistachio toffee again. good things coming up: seeing my family for thanksgiving break, getting the book club up & running, reading more discworld.

Fights against pipelines and all extractive industries in the Americas began long before the Dakota Access struggle, and they will continue long after, too.

Our struggles are deadly serious. We are fighting for water, for life, for future generations. It is no exaggeration to say that our beautiful planet, our only planet, is in danger of dying. And we are running out of time.

The fundamental right to clean water flows through many communities and many struggles right now. The people of Flint, Mich., are still suffering. Water is continuing to be shut off in Detroit and Baltimore and other cities, predominantly in Black neighborhoods. Migrants in border colonias, and farm workers and people in rural Black communities, all deal with unsafe water. On the Navajo reservation, 40 percent of people do not have drinkable water, and there is uranium even in the little babies’ bodies there. More than 100 Native Nations in Canada do not have drinkable water.

“Water Is Life” is not just a slogan. Defending our planet is not a “bougie” white thing, although it can certainly feel that way looking at many environmental nongovernmental organizations. Poor people, Indigenous peoples, people of color are most impacted by environmental devastation. This is OUR struggle.

—  Mahtowin Munro of the United American Indians of New England

No matter how into board gaming you are, I’m sure you’re familiar with Risk. In fact, you probably have it in your attic right now. To catch you up to speed, it’s a world domination game in which you fight against a handful of other people to take over the Earth via brute force. (There’s no diplomacy or trading. You make the biggest army you can and try to make your buddies cry.) A lot of the game is based on rolling dice and building up territory, so later in the game, it can get a little slow and tedious rolling dice 47 times to take over Australia.

In 2012, Hasbro figured that the 50-year-old game was getting a little stale and released Risk Legacy. This isn’t just a re-skin. It’s a completely different game, and it was the first of its kind. This is a game that you play over and over with the same people across multiple sessions until a predetermined amount of games have been finished, changing the game as you go. But here’s the kicker: You can never play it again after that, because the game changes become permanent. This board game has actual spoilers.

5 Reasons Why Board Games Now Are Way Better Than 90s Ones

Today I was struck by a terrible conviction that Jack Zimmermann is a hardcore hockey history nerd who can only occasionally be persuaded to care about anything else that happened in the past.

In elementary school they had to do a report on “My Hero” and Jack researched Jacques Plante and talked for an extremely excited ten minutes about how Plante had a 27-year career and won six Stanley Cups and seven Vezina trophies and was the first goalie in the NHL to play outside the crease and he engineered the use of goalie masks and was a major innovator in player safety and Jack made this papier-mache copy of Plante’s first hockey mask and his dad helped him drill out holes so he could breathe and–

“Jack, who was John Cabot?”

“I don’t know.  Did he play hockey?”

“Jack, tell us about life for settlers* in early Quebec” (*french: les habitants)

“Well, before a game the team* always used to…” (*hockey: Les Habs)

If you want him to talk nonstop for an hour, ask him what he thinks the greatest hockey game of all time was. 

He got over it his monofocus eventually, but only just by extending his laserlike concern to broader topics like “World War II”–he still doesn’t give a crap about anything outside his area of interest.  It’s still less true to say he is a history geek than to say he took every class Samwell offered related to hockey, from Sports Management to Kinesiology to Human Ecology 267: History of Leisure and Recreation, and then looked at his credits and went, “Huh, I could make a history degree out of this.”

2

Generations ago, the American Indian Osage tribe was forced to move. Not for the first time, white settlers pushed them off their land in the 1800s. They ended up in a rocky, infertile area in northeast Oklahoma in hopes that settlers would finally leave them alone.

As it turned out, the land they had chosen was rich in oil, and in the early 20th century members of the tribe became spectacularly wealthy. They bought cars and built mansions; they made so much oil money that the government began appointing white guardians to “help” them spend it.

And then Osage members started turning up dead.

Find out more here.

– Petra