serpentine

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OnyxDraws Presents:

Awesome Gemsonas: Vol. 2

Ladies, Gentlemen and everyone in between, I present to you my magnum opus, the sequel to my previous “Awesome Gemsona” collection.

Like before, I wanted to make another appreciation post for awesome gemsonas, but I wanted to make it even more special than before, to show how much I appreciate the work that goes into these designs and personalities.

This collection includes 14 gemsonas in total, all drawn and colored with great care and attention.

Topaz: @doodlekoy
Bronzite: @redski
Moissanite: @pizzazone
Citrine: @marcuslarry
White Jade & Jet Black: @ruki-32
Ruby and Sapphire: @linkerbell and @drawbauchery
Red Diamond: @lunasafina
Serpentine: @charlioak
Red Onyx: @riikaruh
Sphene: @reo-coquelicot
Ametrine: @deer-head-xiris
Siam: @floofhips

I hope you all like it! :)

(Fun note: The backgrounds and collection title were inspired by the recent “Guardians of the Galaxy: Vol. 2″, I also listened to nothing but GotG music while I drew all this, songs like “Mr. Blue Sky” and “Fox on the Run”. Listening to those songs while looking at these pictures is really fitting, and I totally recommend.)

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Bactrian “Master of Animals” Vase, 2nd ML BC

See it in 360°

A carved serpentine vase, conical in profile with flared rim; frieze of a standing kilted god or hero with horned headdress and hatched hair, grasping in each hand the neck of a rearing serpent, each with gaping mouth and slender protruding tongue, elliptical panels in two lines to the body; supplied with a laminated card clarifying the design.

Items such as this were produced on the island of Tarut in the Gulf, close to the Arabian coast. The carving is known as the Intercultural Style and combines stylistic elements that are paralleled in eastern Iran and western Central Asia with iconography that derives from, and mingles, those of Mesopotamia, Iran and Harappa. The figure is most commonly described as the ‘Master of Animals,’ a hero figure that is associated with the control of the chaotic forces of nature as represented by wild animals. vessels such as this have been found at religious sites, such as the temple of the moon god Sin at Khafajah.

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Connemara marble

Connemara is a famous region in the west of Ireland. It means “Inlets for the Sea” in the Irish language and has a tremendous rugged beauty. Connemara Marble is a rare form of marble found in the region which is typically greenish in colour: colour and markings in the marble reflect the natural beauty of the mountains of Connemara. It is said to be one of the rarest forms of marble in the world due to its limited supply and dates back over 600 million years. 

Connemara marble is also said to bring serenity to those who keep it close: in Irish folklore, rubbing a stone crafted from Connemara marble (Irish worry stone) is believed to relieve worries and bring luck. For many centuries Connemara marble has been used as a traditional gift between families who vowed friendship through generations.

Fishermen would carry a worry stone with them while out at sea to ensure success in their undertakings and a safe return. It is also given as a gift to remind people of Celtic origins of their homeland, though they may travel or live overseas. A precious and magical gem to carry with them always.

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When a mini garden is done right, the plants feel grown in, not stuffed in, as if they have adapted to each other’s shape. This feeling is partially an illusion based on the care given to the initial positioning, but there is so much more to it. These are time based sculptures, so we think ahead, drawing on deep experiential knowledge of the differing habits, light responses, and growth rates. Lastly, we prune, pull and adapt as needed. Nothing is ever finished, but rather meticulously “caretaken”. By attending to these details, you set up the garden to grow into a pleasing, symbiotic whole.

Mini garden by Jon Schwark
Pottery by Conrad Gendron