sepharade

Books mentioned in An Unnecessary Woman

Here’s a list of all the books mentioned in Rabih Alameddine’s An Unnecessary Woman, a novel about a book-obsessed 72-year-old woman who only leaves her book-laden apartment when she has to. What are some of your favorites here?

1. Austerlitz (2001) by W G Sebald
2. The Emigrants (1992) by W G Sebald
3. 2666 (2004) by Roberto Bolaño
4. The Savage Detectives (1998) by Roberto Bolaño
5. A Heart So White (1992) by Javier Marias
6. Tomorrow in the Battle Think on Me (1994) by Javier Marias
7. Your Face Tomorrow Trilogy (2002-2007) by Javier Marias
8. A Tale of Two Cities (1859) by Charles Dickens
9. Invisible Cities (1972) by Italo Calvino
10. Cinnamon Shops (1934) by Bruno Schulz
11. The Conformist (1951) by Alberto Moravia
12. Lolita (1955) by Vladimir Nabokov
13. The Reluctant Fundamentalist (2007) by Mohsin Hamid
14. The Shipping News (1993) by Annie Proulx
15. The Magic Mountain (1924) by Thomas Mann
16. 100 Years of Solitude (1967) by Gabriel Garcia Marquez
17. The Year of the Death of Ricardo Reis (1984) by Jose Saramago
18. Murphy (1938) by Samuel Beckett
19. Waiting for Godot (1952) by Samuel Beckett
20. Death of a Travelling Salesman (1936) by Eudora Welty
21. Giovanni’s Room (1956) by James Baldwin
22. Corydon (1924) by Andre Gide
23. Sepharad (2001) by Antonio Muñoz Molina
24. Sophie’s Choice (1979) by William Styron
25. Nightwood (1936) by Djuna Barnes
26. The Leopard (1957) by Guiseppe Lampedusa
27. Kaddish for an Unborn Child (1990) by Imre Kertész
28. Fatelessness (1975) by Imre Kertész
29. Crime & Punishment ((1866) by Fyodor Dostoyevsky
30. The Brothers Karamozov (1880) by Fyodor Dostoyevsky
31. Madame Bovary (1856) by Gustave Flaubert
32. The Waves (1931) by Virginia Woolf
33. Mrs Dalloway (1925) by Virginia Woolf
34. Anna Karenina (1877) by Leo Tolstoy
35. The Book of Disquiet (1888-1935) by Fernando Pessoa
36. The Fall (1956) by Albert Camus
37. The French Lieutenant’s Woman (1969) by John Fowles
38. Metamorphosis (1915) by Franz Kafka   [my review]
39. The English Patient (1992) by Michael Ondaatje
40. Dubliners (1914) by James Joyce
41. Herzog (1964) by Saul Bellow
42. Hills like White Elephants (1927) by Ernest Hemingway
43. For Whom the Bell Tolls (1940) by Ernest Hemingway
44. The Encyclopaedia of the Dead (1983) by Danilo Kiš
45. Ransom (2009) by David Malouf
46. The Colour Purple (1982) by Alice Walker
47. This Way for the Gas, Ladies and Gentlemen (1947) by TadeuszBorowski
48. Alice in Wonderland (1865) by Lewis Carroll
49. The Vanity of Human Wishes (1749) by Samuel Johnson
50. Flight Without End (1927) by Joseph Roth
51. Hunger (1890) by Knut Hamsun
52. A Book of Memories (1986) by Péter Nádas
53. The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie (1961) by Muriel Spark
54. A House for Mr Biswas (1961) by V S Naipaul
55. Midnight’s Children (1981) by Salman Rushdie
56. Waiting for the Barbarians (1980) by J M Coetzee

anonymous asked:

Can you please explain your culture? Why are they so many different types of jewish people? Does ladino mean your mixed race jew? I'm sorry if this is coming off rude. I don't mean that. It's not my intent. I just want to understand your culture. :)

Hi! You haven’t bothered me. I’ll try to answer you in a concise way.
First, I’m guessing you mean Sephardic culture? Basically Sephardic Jews are the Jews of Spain, Portugal, mediterranean countries and the Middle East and North Africa and their descendants. The adjective “Sephardic” and corresponding nouns Sephardi is derived from the Hebrew word “Sepharad,” which refers to Spain. Sephardic culture developed and enriched around the countries we stay in. A good example would be the language we developed for our own and that’s Ladino (also called djidio or djudeo espanyol) which is a mix between old Castilian, Hebrew, Turkish, Darija, Italian, Arabic, Bulgarian, Greek…

Why are there so many types of Jewish people? Cause we’ve been everywhere and depending on where, we developed differently. So the short response is cause diaspora. Here you can read more about it : https://www.myjewishlearning.com/article/types-of-jews/

For more examples about ladino you could search my tag #ladino and see some examples of it and you can always send me a direct message if you want to ask more questions I’ll try to respond them the best way I can.