sensory disorders

Auditory Processing Problems

• *someone says something* “what?” *repeats themselves* “sorry?” *repeats themselves again* “pardon?”

•"hey, y'see the red thing at the top of the shelf, will you get it?“ "Sorry, what?” “On the sh-” “oh yeah sure, I’ll get it.”

•*doesn’t hear teacher because someone’s pen is making a scratchy sound at the back of the room*

•*replays video 10 ten times to figure out what they’re saying*

•teachers asking, “why do you always stop writing in the middle of a sentence, just write down whatever I’m saying,” followed by the response, “I’m just processing it,” rebuked by, “we’ll stop processing it and just write.”

•*gets really focused on staring out the window and goes through four songs without hearing a single on*

9

@actuallyadhd

[Image Descriptions:

All slides have a light blue background, and the text is written in blue rectangles with rounded corners.

Slide 1: The title is in white text inside a dark blue circle that is centred in the slide.

Sensory Overload And how to cope

Slide 2: The header is in a dark blue rectangle and white text, and the body is in a pale blue rectangle and black text.

Sensory overload has been found to be associated with disorders such as:

  • Fibromyalgia (FM)
  • Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS)
  • Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)
  • Autistic spectrum disorders
  • Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD)
  • Synesthesia

Slide 3: The text is in three pale blue rectangles that go horizontally across the slide. All use black text. The last rectangle has four smaller dark blue rectangles with white text inside it for the four points. The text is centred in all of the rectangles.

Sensory overload occurs when one (or more) of the body’s senses experiences over-stimulation from the environment.

Basically it feels like everything is happening at once, and is happening too fast for you to keep up with.

Sensory overload can result from the overstimulation of any of the senses.

Hearing: Loud noise or sound from multiple sources, such as several people talking at once.

Sight: Bright lights, strobe lights, or environments with lots of movement such as crowds or frequent scene changes on TV.

Smell and Taste: Strong aromas or spicy foods.

Touch: Tactile sensations such as being touched by another person or the feel of cloth on skin.

Slide 4: A heading in two light blue rectangles with black text, followed by a table with a dark blue first row that has white text, and then alternating pale blue and white rows with black text. (The table is not really a table, it is just a four-column list.)

Obviously, everyone reacts in differently to sensory overload.

Some behavioural examples are:

Irritability — “Shutting down” — Covers eyes around bright lights — Difficulty concentrating
Angry outbursts — Refuses to interact and participate — Covers ears to close out sounds or voices — Jumping from task to task without completing
Overexcitement — Low energy levels — Difficulty speaking — Compains about noises not effecting others
High energy levels — Sleepiness/fatigue — poor eye contact — Overly sensitive to sounds/lights/touch
Fidgeting and restlessness — Avoids touching/being touched — Muscle tension — Difficulty with social interactions

Slide 5: The header is in a dark blue box with pointy corners and white text. The body is in a pale blue box with pointy corners and black text.

There are two different methods to prevent sensory overload: avoidance and setting limits:

  • Create a more quiet and orderly environment - keeping the noise to a minimum and reducing the sense of clutter.
  • Rest before big events.
  • Focus your attention and energy on one thing at a time.
  • Restrict time spent on various activities.
  • Select settings to avoid crowds and noise.
  • One may also limit interactions with specific people to help prevent sensory overload.

Slide 6: This looks the same as the last slide except the text in the header is black.

It is important in situations of sensory overload to calm oneself and return to a normal level.

  • Remove yourself from the situation.
  • Deep pressure against the skin combined with proprioceptive input that stimulates the receptors in the joints and ligaments often calms the nervous system.
  • Reducing sensory input such as eliminating distressing sounds and lowering the lights can help.
  • Calming, focusing music works for some.
  • Take an extended rest if a quick break doesn’t relieve the problem.

Slide 7: Four light blue rectangles with rounded corners, stacked one above the other, with black text.

What if someone you know is experiencing sensory overload?

Recognize the onset of overload. If they appear to have lost abilities that they usually have, such as forgetting how to speak, this is often a sign of severe overload.

Reduce the noise level. If they are in a noisy area, offer to guide them somewhere more quiet. Give time to process questions and respond, because overload tends to slow processing. If you can control the noise level, for example by turning off music, do so.

Do not touch or crowd them. Many people in SO are hypersensitive to touch - being touched or thinking they are about to be touched can worsen the overload. If they are seated or are a small child, get down to their level instead of looming above them.

Slide 8: Similar to previous slide, only with three rectangles instead of four.

Don’t talk more than necessary. Ask if you need to in order to help, but don’t try to say something reassuring or get them talking about something else. Speech is sensory input, and can worsen overload.

If they have a jacket, they may want to put it on and put the hood up. This helps to reduce stimulation, and many people find the weight of a jacket comforting. If their jacket is not within reach, ask them if they want you to bring it. A heavy blanket can also help in a similar way.

Don’t react to aggression. Don’t take it personally. It is rare for someone who is overloaded to cause serious harm, because they don’t want to hurt you, just get out of the situation. Aggression often occurs because you tried to touched/restrained/blocked their escape.

Slide 9: Similar to previous slide, only with two rectangles instead of three.

When they have calmed down, be aware that they will often be tired and more susceptible to overload for quite awhile afterwards. It can take hours or days to fully recover from an episode of sensory overload. If you can, try to reduce stress occurring later on as well.

If they start self-injuring, you should usually not try to stop them. Restraint is likely to make their overload worse. Only intervene if they are doing something that could cause serious injury, such as hard biting or banging their head. It’s a lot better to deal with self-injury indirectly by lowering overload.

Slide 10: The header is in a dark blue rectangle with white text, and the other text is in a row of five dark blue circles with white text. The text is centred in all shapes.

To summarise - Remember the 5 R’s

Recognise
The symptoms of overload

Remove
Yourself from the situation

Reduce
the stimulus causing the overload

Relax
Your body and calm yourself down

Rest
Yourself as you will most likely feel fatigue.]

Michael Mell is on the spectrum

In BMC- the clips we’ve seen of the show- in all the scenes where Michael is wearing his hoodie, if he is stressed, or has something to lose (when Jeremy is receiving the squip and Michael is apprehensive, when Jeremy goes to get the girl, when Jeremy stomps off after saying he hates the school, when Jeremy hasn’t acknowledged him all day because of optic nerve blocking, when Jeremy chooses to side with the squip and the upgrade instead of following Michael, etc) whenever something stressful, unnerving, or hurtful happens- MICHAEL WEARS THE HOOD UP TO COVER HIS HEAD-
This may not seem like a big deal to some people but as someone on the autism spectrum- this is a clear coping mechanism that a lot of people on the spectrum use-
It helps to kind of hide you a bit and give you some kind of little relief and sanctuary- the same thing with headphones- wearing headphones can help block out unwanted noise that you are overly sensitive to and drown it out with noise that brings you comfort (in michael’s case- sometimes Bob Marley)
Another common trait in people on the spectrum, is anxiety over change. People on the spectrum typically grow attached and accustomed to their routines and get startled and disoriented by change. This is another trait that can be seen in michael- in the opening number- he is introduced for the very first time singing:
“Jeremy, my buddy, how’s it hanging? Lunch is banging. Got my sushi, got my slushy and more!”
First of all, it is arguable that when Michael says “Got my sushi, got my slushy, and more” it is a glimpse of these said patterns that tend to fall into place and make people on the spectrum more at ease. Notice how he doesn’t say “I got sushi and a slushy” he says “got my sushi, got my slushy”- he states it simply like this because Jeremy is his best friend and knows his patterns and habits- which is why he so plainly states it like everybody knows about them. I think this is an example of Michael’s system- he gets his sushi, he gets his slushy, he listens to his music, he wears his same hoodie, and he goes to school.
Second of all (and this is more debatable than the rest) before Michael goes on to share his routinely patterns, something that stuck out to me was that Michael wasn’t as socially adept as other characters- he addresses his friend and does the socially acceptable thing by asking how he is doing, but then immediately moves on without receiving an answer. This isn’t because he is selfish or a dick- in my mind it’s another trait of people on the spectrum. For people with high functioning autism, social interactions can be extremely difficult because it is hard to comprehend what is socially acceptable and what isn’t. This can make some relationships hard because they may come off as rude or uncaring when in reality they just aren’t able to easily slide into conversation and act completely normally.
Third of all, when he says “and more” I thought it was cute because it showed his excitement for having accomplished something. For people off of the spectrum, little things like accepting a little change isn’t anything out of the norm because life is unpredictable and things change all the time. But for people on the spectrum, even little things like being able to roll with one simple change can be a huge victory. Change is a lot harder for us so being able to deal with slight change is a big deal. After this line- Michael says “the roll was Mekhi maki and I’m feeling kind of cocky, cause the girl at sev-elev gave me a generous pour”. Just the little change of the extra pour, extra slushy, Michael was able to accept and that was a win for him, enough to make him feel confident and cocky.

Throughout the musical and album there is more evidence of this but I think that it is at least debatable that Michael may be on the spectrum. Honestly it wouldn’t surprise me for George Salazar to portray a character like that as he has been good with mental health representation in the past. I honestly love the idea of an autistic character in a musical because there isn’t a whole lot of positive representation elsewhere. You don’t have to agree but I’m probably going to always see Michael now as a representation for me

Masterpost: Sensory differences

If you know a bit about autism, or have been following this blog for some time, you must be aware that one of the autistic traits which has the most consequences on our daily lives is our sensory differences. They have an impact on all spheres of our lives: on what we can and cannot do, on where we can and cannot go, on what we can eat, wear, listen to, on our ways to feel good and on what makes us feel bad.

Such a wide subject definitely warrants a masterpost. So, here we go!

First, let’s take a look at the human sensory system, to understand the different areas in which there can be differences. It’s actually more complicated than the traditional five senses! Our sensory system is divided into three parts:

  • Exteroception : sensing what comes from the environment outside your body.
  • Interoception : sensing the internal physiological condition of your body
  • Proprioception : sensing the position your limbs and body are in

These three main areas encompass different senses (note that this is one model and others exist):

  • Exteroception: sight, hearing, smell, taste, touch, but also thermoception (sensation of heat/cold) and nociception (sensation of pain)
  • Interoception: nociception (internal pain), feelings of hunger, lack of oxygen, thirst, need to pee, as well as monitoring of the respiratory rate and heart rate.
  • Proprioception: the kinesthetic sense (knowledge of the movement and relative positions of your body parts) and the vestibular sense (knowledge of body movement, direction and acceleration)


For all of these senses, autistic people can have them work typically, be hyposensitive (less sensitive than most people), be hypersensitive (more sensitive than most people) or have sensory processing differences which do not fall under the hypo/hyper system.

The clinical term which encompasses these differences is “Sensory Processing Disorder”. One can have SPD without being autistic, but all or almost all autistic people have SPD.

It should be noted, however, that some autistic people don’t like to think of it as a disorder and prefer simply talking about sensory processing differences.

Something very important to understand is that hypersensitivity and hyposensitivity CAN coexist in any one person’s sensory system. For example, they might be hypersensitive to smell and hyposensitive to touch. They can also be hyper/hypo sensitive to only one aspect of one sense (for instance, pressure or texture or bright lights or sweet tastes). They can also be sometimes hyposensitive to something, and sometimes hypersensitive to it.

Being hypersensitive to a stimulus and being exposed to it can cause what is called “sensory overload”, which usually translates to pain, discomfort, and impaired cognitive functions (in other words, trouble thinking properly). If pushed further (very intense stimuli or very long exposition), it can lead to a shutdown or meltdown.

Being hyposensitive to something and lacking stimulation can translate to restlessness, discomfort, and even pain, as well as an intense craving for the stimuli.


Here are some examples of what hypersensitivity to different senses can translate to, on a behavioral and subjective level:

  • Sight: The person wears sunglasses, maybe even indoors. They avoid places with fluorescent lightning, blinking lightning or too bright lightning. They dislike looking at brightly colored surfaces. They may have trouble with visually cluttered spaces, such as crowds and supermarkets. They may find any kind of flickering or movement around them painful to see.

  • Hearing: They may hear sounds no one else can hear (and some have been tested to hear outside the normal human range). They may have to wear headphones/ear defenders in noisy places. They may avoid crowds and events with lots of people/loud music/shouting. They may have difficulty with the noise of the vacuum, of the construction work on the other side of the street, of the clock ticking in the next room. They may develop tinnitus eventually.

  • Smell: They’ll probably dislike places with strong smells such as perfume shops, farms, or crowded public transportation. They may need to wash themselves, their clothes and their sheet very often to keep body odors to a minimum. They may not tolerate scented soap, shampoo or deodorant (and it’s sometimes difficult to find an unscented one!). They may struggle with the smell of food in general, or with particular smells.

  • Taste: They may be very picky eaters, only tolerating a couple of very bland-tasting food such as mashed potatoes or pasta. They may have difficulty having diverse enough diets with all the nutrients they need. They may always eat the exact same thing.

  • Touch: They may have trouble finding clothing with a texture that they can tolerate. They may need to cut all the tags off their clothing. They may absolutely hate anyone touching them. They may be ok with firm touch, but find light brushy touches painful. They may have trouble wearing specific items of clothing, such as socks/shoes, headphones or hats. They may hate people touching their hair, or find brushing their hair very difficult. They may find brushing their teeth nearly impossible because of the scratching sensation. They may have trouble with the texture of many foods, and be a picky eater because of that.

  • Thermoception: They may be very sensitive to cold, and always wearing loads of clothing and turning the heating up even when other people don’t think it’s that cold. They may be very sensitive to heat, finding summer very hard to cope with, especially if they don’t have access to AC. They may be hyper-aware of tiny changes in temperature, feeling cold when it is dropping and hot when it is rising regardless of the actual temperature.

  • Nociception: They may be more sensitive to pain than most people, and find very painful what most people would shrug off. (They’re not being a drama queen! They really do feel more pain!)

  • Vestibular sense: They may get motion sickness very easily.


And here are some examples for hyposensitivity:

  • Sight: The person may have trouble finding things in visually crowded environments. They may enjoy looking at bright colored lights or at objects in motion (spinning top/twirling fingers…)

  • Hearing: They may not notice being called or being talked to, especially when focused. They may enjoy listening to very loud music, singing, or making lots of noises.

  • Smell: They may not notice smells which other people do. They may enjoy strong smells such as perfume, essential oils or body odor. They may enjoy sniffing a favorite blanket, a significant other, a pet, or anything they like.

  • Taste: They may be able to ingest an impressive amount of spicy food, and may crave strong tasting food (pepper, lemon, salt, sugar…).

  • Touch: They may love rubbing/touching favorite textures, rubbing their hands together… They may love and crave deep pressure, such as having heavy weights on top of them.

  • Thermoception: They may be outside in winter with just a T-shirt, or not be bothered by the heat in summer and even wear a sweater. They may enjoy touching very hot things such as radiators or very hot water, or very cold things like ice cubes or snow.

  • Nociception: They may be less sensitive to pain than most people and not notice it when they’ve been hurt.

  • Vestibular sense: They may love roller coasters, boat rides when there’s a lot of waves… They may never get motion sickness of any sort. They may spend time rocking or like to chill upside down.

  • Kinesthetic sense: They may be very clumsy since they have a poor sense of the position of their body in space. They may stumble a lot and be generally bad at sports. They may have trouble with fine motor skills such as handwriting or sewing. They may enjoy doing repetitive motions such as hand flapping.

  • Interoception: They may have trouble noticing  when they are hungry, thirsty, tired, or when they need to go to the bathroom. They may need to set alarms or to have self-care at set times as part of their routine.


These are of course only examples and hyper or hyposensitivity can express themselves in as many ways are there are people who experience them.

Here are some examples of other sensory differences autistic people can experience:

  • Synesthesia seems more frequent among autistic people than in the general population. It is defined as a transfer from one sensory modality to another: for example, seeing sounds or hearing tastes. It can also mean associating colors or personalities to numbers/letters. In autistic people specifically, it can be a very positive thing (you can now stim with two senses at the same time!) or something painful (these bright lights are awful, well now they’re harsh noises too).

  • We often struggle with processing sensory information, especially speech, which can mean we can have a lot of trouble understanding what people say, might take a lot of time to process speech (which results in conversations such as” “Hey, will you get me this thing please?” “What?” “I said, will-” “Oh yeah, sure”), and might need subtitles to be able to understand movies. Processing information from two different senses at a time can also be difficult, which often translates as “I can either look at the images or understand what’s being said”. This is one of the causes of our struggle with eye contact.

That’s all for today. We hope this helped. We are currently preparing a masterpost on stimming which will be quite related to this one. Happy writing!

CLOTHING FOR DISABLED PPL UPDATE so I’m in the process of moving but by June 10th I will have available:

  • a weighted vest with a chewable drawstring and a hood. v deep BIG (fit an ipad inside) sized pockets with fringes inside. you can chose to close it with big snaps or a zipper. lots of space in the armpit. the trim and hood will be a different color/pattern than the main, and you’ll be able to buy many different colors or sizes. 
  • all these come in every size. it’s priced by size and thin ppl have to pay too
  • trim and sleeves will all be in different colors
  • everything will come in space/plant or plain designs
  • all the pockets can fit an ipad mini in them and will have fringes inside for stimming
  • all fabric sensory safe and approved by my v sensory conscious butt
  • a cropped jacket with a chewable drawstring and a hood. also huge pockets. big snaps or a zipper to close. fleece lined sleeves. sleeves, hood, trim all different colors. many different colors and sizes
  • late 1960s-type sleeveless tent dress with the same giant pockets, and one small breast pocket for cash. neckline will be a small collar that isn’t tight. zipper down the back. many colors and sizes
  • a cropped tank top/undershirt with a medium scoop neck. cap sleeves and trim in a different color. 
  • a big oversized long t shirt with a zipper down the back. a small scoop neck that isn’t tight. 8 inch sleeves that are huge. giant pockets, again. many colors and sizes.
  • cropper long-sleeve shirt with 17 inch sleeves and a large scoop neck. sleeves and trim in a different pattern. more many colors and sizes.
  • cropped, highwaisted, big-pocket “men’s style” sweatpants with kind of fitted but not tight pant’s legs. many colors.
  • drawstring shorts that are just big and comfy with huge pockets. lots of colors.
  • just above the knee godete skirt with optimum “look pretty when spinning”ness. same with lots of colors and big pockets
  • SHOES that are breathable. hard to describe but they’re similar to a high top converse except they’re buttoned over with snaps so you don’t have to tie your shoes bc tbh i can’t tie mine
  • also totally willing to accommodate any disabilities if ppl need things changed including adding a zipper down the back of things so wheelchair bound friends can put them on

right now i have 

noise muffling beanies/headphones in plain, plant/space designs

soft jewelry, which is a sensory friendly and cute necklace/bracelet that comes in many patterns and colors.

etsy link

I just want to write more anxious!Tony and explore his mental illness more and I want to add sensory-overload and people actually fucking supporting him instead of the clusterfuck that is the MCU. I’m gonna throw this snippet at you and see what happens.

Edit: I just read up on Sensory Processing Disorder and EVERYTHING DESCRIBES TONY WHAT THE FUCK I’M CONSIDERING IT CANON.


“These are time-sensitive,” Pepper said, opening the folder so he could see the contracts inside. She watched Tony’s eyes track over the paper before she turned to the next page for him. “Can I leave these with you if I spread them out on the desk?”

“…Yes,” Tony decided.

“Alright.” She spread the pages out over his desk. “I need to go send some faxes. Will you be okay?”

Tony stared at the pages. “…Yes.”

Pepper turned to leave, pausing at the door. “If you have trouble, just call me.”

“I will,” Tony said, nodding. He waited for her to leave before he stuck his tongue out at the paperwork.

He read everything over and decided they were all worth signing. Unfortunate. He grabbed a pen, hand hovering over the first contract, then let out a frustrated sound and began pacing his office.

Pepper found him still pacing. “Do you need me to hold your hand?”

No,” Tony answered immediately. “I can do it!”

“I never said you couldn’t do it. I asked if you wanted me to hold your hand.”

“Well I don’t!” Tony snapped, turning, hand hovering over the contract. After a moment, he finally pressed pen to paper, carefully keeping his hand above it.

Pepper reached out to put a hand on the paper so it wouldn’t move when he signed it. “Where are your gloves?”

“They’re–I was using them–I don’t know,” he admitted, ashamed.

“That’s fine,” she said, not accusing. “I’ll make you another pair.”

“I’m sorry,” he said softly.

Pepper reached toward him, hand hovering over his shoulder for a moment before she actually set it down. “It’s fine. I just wish you’d told me.” She began collecting the contracts before he could say anything else. “It’s fine. I’ll make them while I catch up on Desperate Housewives.

Tony frowned, uncertain. “Okay.”

“Right? Okay.” She smiled at him. “I think we’re done here for the day.”

Tony blinked at her, then hesitantly walked around his desk, just waiting for her to say ‘oh, I forgot!’ When she didn’t, he managed an awkward but sincere smile and walked past her.

Pepper looked through the contracts one last time, frowning a little. She wished she could forge his signature.


Natalie tried to hand him a sheaf of papers.

Tony skittered away, tugging his pocket square from his jacket and beginning to rub it with his thumbs anxiously. “No thank you.”

Natalie stared at him, looking the closest to confused that he’d ever seen her. “That… that wasn’t a request.”

“I’ll take those,” Pepper said pleasantly, taking the sheaf of papers from her hands. She looked through them. “Patent paperwork.”

“Oh,” Tony said, still rubbing his pocket square.

“Not necessarily as time-sensitive, but you definitely need to sign them.”

“Oh.”

Pepper glanced up at him. “It’s not inappropriate to be startled, Tony.” She looked at Natasha. “Tony needs to know you’re there, and he doesn’t like to be handed things.” She gave Natalie a quietly dangerous look, daring her to say something.

“…I can do that,” Natalie said after a moment. She noticed Tony’s shoulders relaxing and didn’t raise an eyebrow, instead adding, “Is there anything else I need to know?”

“Don’t be afraid to tell Tony if he’s standing too close to you,” Pepper answered immediately, then turned to raise an eyebrow at Tony.

Tony flushed and looked down at his feet. “Don’t wear strong perfume. Or. Uh. Perfume at all? Um, and I don’t like to stand in large groups. And I–when I request a certain food, I’m not–I need that food. I’m not–I’m not picky. It’s the texture.”

“The… texture,” Natalie repeated slowly, eyes flicking down to the silk pocket square in his hands. “Okay. I can work with that.”

“And he has special gloves if you have any time-sensitive paperwork,” Pepper added.

“Okay,” Natalie said again, nodding. “I can make this work.” She couldn’t help but swallow thickly when Tony looked incredibly grateful, and she wondered how many times his needs had been ignored.

Natasha felt awful when she stuck him in the neck. She felt worse when he looked up at her, betrayed, and visibly closed off.


“You said I was a narcissist,” Tony said accusingly.

Natasha did not flinch, but only because she’d been trained not to. “How did you get in my room?”

“A textbook narcissist, even.”

“…I decided,” she said after a moment of thought. “That SHIELD didn’t need to know about your disorder.”

Tony stared at her for a long moment. “So you lied instead.”

“Yes.”

“I wouldn’t have been approved for this initiative anyway, would I? Because I’m–I’m a mess?”

Natasha opened her mouth, then shut it again, tilting her head thoughtfully. “…You function,” she finally decided on. “Better than most people in your position would. And you seem to do well in the suit when you’re not dying. I wrote that evaluation under certain circumstances, and I wrote it to say the things people wanted to hear. How much it is true or false now doesn’t matter.”

Tony fidgeted with his cuff links, swaying a little where he stood. “…I’m still mad,” he finally decided.

“That’s fair.”

“I’m leaving now.”

“Do you need me to walk you out of the building?”

Tony’s fidgeting grew. “…What’s the alarm for?”

Natasha could not hear an alarm, but she believed him. “I have no idea,” she admitted honestly. “I have earplugs. Would you like them?”

“…Yes,” he answered meekly.

Natasha didn’t say he was weak, because he wasn’t. And she didn’t say he could do better, because he was already doing his best. Instead she set the earplugs on her bedside table and let him pick them up, then waited for him to put them in before she led him out of her apartment, not saying a word when his arm occasionally brushed hers.


“I need,” Tony began, then stopped, clutching his sleeves.

Jim sat up with a snort, still somewhat bleary-eyed. “What? What do you need?”

“I didn’t mean to wake you,” Tony said guiltily.

“I was on the couch, it’s fine.” Jim rubbed his eyes before looking up at him. “What do you need?”

Tony looked down at his feet. “I’m tired. …’nd sad.”

“Aw, Tones,” Jim cooed, immediately holding his arms out. “C’mere.”

Tony shuffled around him, anxious, then held out a robe. “Here.”

Jim pulled the robe on over his arms, spreading the rest of it over his body, then held his arms out again. The brunet touched the robe cautiously, and only then crawled into his lap. “I’m glad you know you can come to me, Tones. Wanna sleep?”

“It’s too loud,” Tony admitted, curling his fingers in the soft material of the robe.

“In your head, or out?”

“Both.”

“Okay,” Jim said, because he could work with that. “You got your earplugs in?”

“Yeah.”

He began rubbing a soothing hand up and down Tony’s spine. “Great. I’m gonna recite pi as far as I can and if you’re not asleep by then I’m gonna start reciting every component of an F-16′s motor.”

Tony was asleep just after the one hundred and forty-third number of pi. Jim was glad, because he’d only memorized the first one hundred and fifty.

Okay so just a little heads up:

If you work in retail, or somewhere else that require costumer service, please do not think that customers are being rude if they do not answer you.

That customer may have anxiety, selective mutism, or be autistic. They might not be able to talk or they may be too afraid to make small talk.

So please don’t call us assholes, shitheads, or bitches because we can’t make small talk at the counter. It’s probably not our fault.

i’m taking pre-orders for my spd/autism noise muffling beanies/headbands

YO I am so autistic and SO PUMPED that I came up with this product. earbuds and noise cancelling headphones are sensory hell for me, but I have finally figured out how to use only fabric to block out between 50% of sound. but if you order custom, I can adjust the amount of fabric to allow the amount of sound in you want.

the beanies and headbands are made of recycled sweaters!!!

i’ll start making them march 11th and i can have them shipped by march 12th seriously im hyperfocused

plain beanies are $15. plain headbands are $10. beanies with designs are $20. headbands with designs are $13. shipping is free because GREECE but it will also take about a month to get there because GREECE

you can pre-order a plain one, a space themed one, a plant themed one, or an animal themed one (my special interests lol)

OR you can custom order one in your special interest! i’m already making one for someone who really likes monsters and it’s going to have horns and lots of eyes so basically tell me what you’re interested in. custom beanies are $25 and custom headbands are $17. i can also change the fabric or add zippers or snaps or tassles or fringes. really just let your sensory desires run wild my buds

in conclusion i am SO FREAKING HAPPY. i see so many products for autistic people made by allistic people and it’s like??? no. i’m autistic and can’t hold down a job because of my anxiety disorder, so this is my only source of income. i’m also trying to save up money to buy a retired greyhound that is dying so i can give them a good home

etsy shop will be up tomorrow. PLEASE message me with what you want and i will mesage you because i’ll probably have made it in 1-3 days

please sign boost for autistic/spd people who shouldn’t have to deal with uncomfortable and unstylish ear protection!!!

Things You Can do to Help Disabled People That Don't Cost A Cent
  • Do not talk about an obviously disabled person in front of them as if they can’t hear or understand you.
  • Do not talk to a disabled person’s companion instead of them.  
  • Ask permission before touching people, or their wheelchairs/other equipment. Even if you want to help.
  • Ask disabled people about their lives and really listen to their answers.  (Within reason. Asking people personal questions about their sex lives, for example, is rude unless you are very close to them and they’ve communicated they’re OK with that).
  • Listen to what they say whether they are speaking, writing, typing, using text to speech, using a letterboard, using PECS, gesturing, using sign language, or using any other form of communication.  People who cannot speak can still communicate.
  • Stand up for people you see getting bullied.
  • Understand that disabled people don’t just need friends, they can be friends, too.
  • Every public place does not need to have loud, blaring music and TVs with flashing screens.  
  • If you blog, put bright, flashing images that can trigger seizures under a cut so that people with seizures can avoid looking at them.
  • If a job can possibly be done without a person driving, don’t require candidates to drive/have a driver’s license, and don’t interview candidates and then reject them because they don’t drive.
  • When talking to someone who has trouble speaking or stutters, and takes a long time to speak, wait for them to answer. Don’t keep repeating the question or pressuring them. Yes, if you’re like me and your mind is going really fast and you forget what people are saying if they take too long, it can be hard to be patient.  Do it anyway.
  • If you are talking to a deaf person, make it easier for them to lip-read by facing towards them while looking at them, and not covering your mouth with your hands.
  • If you are talking to someone with hearing impairment or auditory processing disorder, it is more helpful to slow down or rephrase what you’re saying than to just speak more loudly.  
  • Some disabled people have difficulty understanding nonliteral language such as metaphors and idioms (e.g., “a stitch in time saves nine”). If you’re talking to someone like this, try explaining what you mean by these figures of speech, or just not using them.
  • Recognize that failure to make eye contact does not mean someone is lying to you. It may be uncomfortable for them.
  • Recognize that unwillingness to go out to loud, crowded bars does not mean someone isn’t interested in socializing with you.
  • If people have difficulty spelling, or using the appropriate jargon/terminology for your social group, do not assume they’re stupid.  You may need to paraphrase some “jargon” for them.
  • Recognize that a person can need time alone and it doesn’t mean they don’t like you or want to be with you. It’s just something they need so they can function at their best.
  • If a person does not recognize you, do not assume they don’t care about you.  They may be face-blind.
  • If a person does not remember your birthday (or other major names, numbers, or dates) do not assume they don’t care about you. They may simply have a bad memory.
  • Understand that a disabled person’s talents, however esoteric, are real, not unimportant “splinter skills.”
  • Colorblindness affects more than just knowing what color something is.  To a colorblind person, colors that they can’t see will look the same if they have the same degree of lightness/darkness.  That means that to a red-green colorblind person, a red rose on a green background will blend in instead of contrast starkly, and the Chicago CTA El map will be difficult to understand.  Understand that something that stands out to you and seems obvious may literally not be visible to a colorblind person.
  • Accept stimming.
  • Don’t tell them “but you look so normal.” But, if they accomplish something you know they were working really hard to do, it’s great to compliment them on it.
  • Understand that a person can be working incredibly hard to do something and may still not perform as well as you’d like them to, as well as the average person would, or as well as the situation demands.
  • If someone has a major medical problem, disability, or chronic illness, then just eating some special healthy diet or exercising more isn’t going to cure it. It might help, it might hurt, it might do nothing, but they’ve probably heard it before, and it’s none of your business in any case.
  • A person with OCD knows that checking or counting or whatever compulsion they perform won't really prevent disaster from happening, it’s just a compulsion. That doesn’t stop them from feeling the need to do it anyway.  A person with anxiety may know at least some of their fears are irrational or unlikely to occur. That doesn’t stop them from feeling anxious.  A person with trichotillomania may know it hurts them to pull out their hair or pick at their skin, but they have trouble stopping themselves anyway.  A depressed person may know they would feel better if they got out of their house and talked to people, but that doesn’t make them feel any more up to doing those things. A person who hallucinates may know the hallucinations aren’t real, but that doesn’t make them go away or feel less upsetting.  You see the pattern?  You can’t cure people with mental illnesses by telling them they’re being irrational or hurting themselves.  If it were that easy, they’d have cured themselves already.
  • Do not tell a person with ADHD or mental illness that they should not be taking medication.  This is a personal decision. Furthermore, since medications have wide-ranging effects on people’s bodies and minds and often unpleasant side effects, most people taking medications have thought through the issue, done a cost-benefit analysis, and decided that the ability to function better is worth it.  Their decision should be respected.
  • A disabled person with intellectual disability who has the academic or IQ abilities of, say, a seven year old does not actually have the mind of a seven year old. They have different life experiences, needs, stages of life, bodies, and so on.
  • If a disabled person is having a meltdown, they are not angry, they are terrified.  They’re not throwing a tantrum or being aggressive, they have gone into fight or flight. The best thing you can do is remain calm yourself and help them calm down. It may help to keep your distance, keep your voice low and calm, let them retreat to a safe place if they know to do that, or remind them to do so if they don’t.  Reasoning with them won’t work well because they’re unlikely to be able to hear and understand you.  The worst thing you can do is start yelling yourself, threatening them, be violent to them, cut off their escape route, or get right up in their personal space.  

Other ideas?  Please reblog and add more.  The more the merrier.