sensible nonsense

list of the worst characters in existence who have 0 redeeming qualities about them in no particular order:

  • denethor ii from the lord of the rings tht creepy ho
  • vernon dursley from harry potter no explanations necessary
  • firelord ozai from avatar (not the one w the blue people)
  • that lady from the bee movie who fell in love w that bee… she actually didnt do anything that terrible to be grouped in 2gthr with those other 3 but the fact that she wanted to bang that bee still haunts me in m sleep nd there isnt enoughg holy water to wash my eyes out with so she gets an honorable mention

feel free to add x

HELLo its Annoying™ (aka chichi .. ) here w a muse …. !! this here is mo,,,its literally just mo , aint nuthin else 2 it Lol, n there’s a lil on her underneath the cut so just hmu or like if u wna plot !! ;)))

( JUSTINE SKYE & FEMALE ) – HAVE YOU SEEN ( MO BROOKS ) AROUND THE ACADEMY? SHE IS A ( 4TH YEAR ) STUDENT AND ONLY ( 20 ) YEARS OLD, AND IF SHE LOOKS FAMILIAR IS BECAUSE SHE IS THE CHILD OF ( ERIC BROOKS (blade bitch.) ). WORD AROUND THE SCHOOL IS THAT SHE IS ( NO NONSENSE & SENSIBLE ), BUT ALSO ( STUBBORN & DISMISSIVE ). WHEN ASKED ABOUT HER POWER SHE LISTS IT AS ( DHAMPIR PHYSIOLOGY ), TIME WILL TELL IF SHE WILL BE A HERO LIKE HER PARENTS. – ( C, 18+, EST, THEY/THEM )

Keep reading

yanmazu  asked:

"The Night of Wishes" by Michael Ende. I loved it so much - I still do. Maurizio the obese cat and Jakob the chronically ill crow were such impossible heroes, as much as Beelzebub and Tyrannia were impossible villains. And they had wonderful group dynamics going on. The fact that each chapter represented one hour, from 5 PM to midnight and the page that explains the "satanarchaeolidealcohellish" adjective kind of blowed my young reader's mind. I need to read it again. Now.

Not having read it yet, the adjective “satanarchaeolidealcohellish” is currently blowing your humble editor’s adult mind. 

(Hey, reader: what was YOUR favorite book as a kid? Why?)

mar-see-ah  asked:

I absolutely adored Bridge to Terabithia by Katherine Paterson. I would read it at least once a month in 2nd, 3rd, and 4th grade and sob like crazy at the end. I loved the friendship, I loved the fantasy, and I loved the tragedy. My mom would come running to my room, worried about the noise, and be shocked that I was crying over it again. "But you know how it ends!" But knowing didn't make it any less tragic. And I have, of course, refused to see the movie.

Willful suffering has been a theme with Tumblr’s favorite books!

(Hey, reader: what was YOUR favorite book as a kid? Why?)

The Sensible Nonsense Project LIVE – in ONE WEEK!

Help us honor the humor, pathos, and enduring wisdom of children’s books! Six speakers will share stories about their own favorite childhood books, what those books taught them, and how those lessons continue to influence their adult lives. Stay on afterward for a delicious reception inspired by after-school snacks, and to get more information about how you, too, can participate in the project. 

SENSIBLE NONSENSE
Hosted by Arielle Brousse
Sponsored by Creative Ventures

Featuring:
JAY KIRK
CAITLIN GOODMAN
EMILY HARNETT (C’13)
ANDREW PANEBIANCO
ANDIE DAVIDSON (C’15)
DYLAN LEAHY (C’16)

Thursday, Feb. 13th | 6:00pm | Arts Café
Kelly Writers House | 3805 Locust Walk
______________________________

JAY KIRK is the author of Kingdom Under Glass (Henry Holt), which was named one of the Best Nonfiction Books of 2010 by the Washington Post. His award-winning nonfiction has been published in Harper’s, GQ, The New York Times Magazine, and anthologized in Best American Crime Writing, Best American Travel Writing, and Submersion Journalism: Reporting in the Radical First Person from Harper’s Magazine. He was a National Magazine Award Finalist in 2013, and the recipient of a 2005 Pew Fellowship in the Arts. He currently teaches in Penn’s Creative Writing Program. His next book, Avoid the Day (HarperCollins), is due out in 2015.

CAITLIN GOODMAN is a librarian and archivist in the Rare Book Department of the Free Library of Philadelphia and writes the monthly “Grumpy Librarian” readers’ advisory column for City Paper. She lives in Philadelphia and, like all librarians, loves cats and cardigans.

EMILY HARNETT (C’13) has been lucky enough to stay in Philadelphia, and at the Writers House, in some professional capacity. She enjoys twentieth century fiction, which she hopes to study next year as a PhD student. Emily’s other research interests include, but are not limited to, Russian history and politics, napping, and Kanye West.

ANDREW PANEBIANCO is a writer at the Philly ad firm, Brownstein Group. Prior to that he inflicted piles of Romantic poetry and Shakespeare on a decade’s worth of college kids. He is also the author of nearly 200 definitions to words that aren’t, but should be. Read more at wordsthatarent.com, and follow him @fancywhitebread.

If ANDIE DAVIDSON (C’15) had her own personal Room of Requirement, it would likely be filled with coffee, chocolate, and books. An English major and French minor, she is a grammar freak and nearly-certifiable shopaholic. In between exploring (or wandering, as her friends would call it) and searching for Crumple-Horned Snorkacks, she can usually be found reading, making up stories in her head, or overusing parentheses.

DYLAN LEAHY (C’16) plans on majoring in English and minoring in Cinema Studies because he enjoys the idea of a future without job security. He filters most of his experiences through pop culture and idolizes various TV lesbians (cheerleader or otherwise). He’s been obsessed with stories and the way they are told ever since his dad read Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone to him when he was seven.