senses

How-To: Sensing Energy

A lot of the newbies I’ve talked to are so hung up on seeing energy. They have  had results, just not results they could see with their eyes. I’d say that 95% of the time , I perceive energy either by feeling it or by using my “6th sense”. Some individuals with the natural talent of seeing auras may be able to pick up visuals easier than others.

The first step to perceiving energy, is to learn to feel it. After you start feeling it, you develop your 6th sense naturally and, in time, that’s all you’ll use.  You just gotta open yourself up and be open to it. Try visualizing energy beaming into parts of your body and see if you can feel something there. This stuff gets easier, you just have to trust yourself and practice.

Here are some ways we use to describe how these energies feel to us that might help you increase your awareness of them. They may be sensed with the hand or all over the body

  • Buzzing or tingling, like when your leg is asleep.
  • Prickly, like static electricity.
  • A feeling of heat without a heat source. (Usually denotes a LOT of energy moving.)
  • A feeling of cold without a physical source.
  • A sense of a rising or falling pitch without any audible sound.
  • A feeling of something flowing through you like wind or a stream or current of warm water.
  • A feeling like a wave passing through you.
  • A sense that some other Being, like an angel or ghost has stepped inside of you (“incorporation”)
  • Pressure or a pushing sensation with nothing touching you.
  • A pulsing sensation that is not in time with your heartbeat. (Usually a balancing “Healing Pulse”.)
  • A sensation of bubbles rising like carbonated water or Alka-Seltzer.
  • A “clanging” sensation like striking a piece of metal held in your hand with a hammer.
  • A spinning or whirling sensation.
  • A fluttering or shimmering sensation.
  • A sensation like a change in altitude or barometric pressure.
  • A sense of lightness that wasn’t present before.
  • A sense of expansion in some way.
  • A shift in consciousness like meditation or falling asleep.
  • A sudden sigh or yawn. (Denotes that you are getting relieved of something by what you came into contact with.) 
I love you.
It’s the most honest thing I could say to you, yet it still feels like a lie. You see, I don’t just love you, I crave your touch. I seek your advice and wish for your laugh. I would go blind just to be your muse, and I would lose my mind if it meant I could watch you become the person you aspire to be. I love you, it’s true, but I believe it goes beyond that, beyond anything words could ever describe.
Masterpost: Sensory differences

If you know a bit about autism, or have been following this blog for some time, you must be aware that one of the autistic traits which has the most consequences on our daily lives is our sensory differences. They have an impact on all spheres of our lives: on what we can and cannot do, on where we can and cannot go, on what we can eat, wear, listen to, on our ways to feel good and on what makes us feel bad.

Such a wide subject definitely warrants a masterpost. So, here we go!

First, let’s take a look at the human sensory system, to understand the different areas in which there can be differences. It’s actually more complicated than the traditional five senses! Our sensory system is divided into three parts:

  • Exteroception : sensing what comes from the environment outside your body.
  • Interoception : sensing the internal physiological condition of your body
  • Proprioception : sensing the position your limbs and body are in

These three main areas encompass different senses (note that this is one model and others exist):

  • Exteroception: sight, hearing, smell, taste, touch, but also thermoception (sensation of heat/cold) and nociception (sensation of pain)
  • Interoception: nociception (internal pain), feelings of hunger, lack of oxygen, thirst, need to pee, as well as monitoring of the respiratory rate and heart rate.
  • Proprioception: the kinesthetic sense (knowledge of the movement and relative positions of your body parts) and the vestibular sense (knowledge of body movement, direction and acceleration)


For all of these senses, autistic people can have them work typically, be hyposensitive (less sensitive than most people), be hypersensitive (more sensitive than most people) or have sensory processing differences which do not fall under the hypo/hyper system.

The clinical term which encompasses these differences is “Sensory Processing Disorder”. One can have SPD without being autistic, but all or almost all autistic people have SPD.

It should be noted, however, that some autistic people don’t like to think of it as a disorder and prefer simply talking about sensory processing differences.

Something very important to understand is that hypersensitivity and hyposensitivity CAN coexist in any one person’s sensory system. For example, they might be hypersensitive to smell and hyposensitive to touch. They can also be hyper/hypo sensitive to only one aspect of one sense (for instance, pressure or texture or bright lights or sweet tastes). They can also be sometimes hyposensitive to something, and sometimes hypersensitive to it.

Being hypersensitive to a stimulus and being exposed to it can cause what is called “sensory overload”, which usually translates to pain, discomfort, and impaired cognitive functions (in other words, trouble thinking properly). If pushed further (very intense stimuli or very long exposition), it can lead to a shutdown or meltdown.

Being hyposensitive to something and lacking stimulation can translate to restlessness, discomfort, and even pain, as well as an intense craving for the stimuli.


Here are some examples of what hypersensitivity to different senses can translate to, on a behavioral and subjective level:

  • Sight: The person wears sunglasses, maybe even indoors. They avoid places with fluorescent lightning, blinking lightning or too bright lightning. They dislike looking at brightly colored surfaces. They may have trouble with visually cluttered spaces, such as crowds and supermarkets. They may find any kind of flickering or movement around them painful to see.

  • Hearing: They may hear sounds no one else can hear (and some have been tested to hear outside the normal human range). They may have to wear headphones/ear defenders in noisy places. They may avoid crowds and events with lots of people/loud music/shouting. They may have difficulty with the noise of the vacuum, of the construction work on the other side of the street, of the clock ticking in the next room. They may develop tinnitus eventually.

  • Smell: They’ll probably dislike places with strong smells such as perfume shops, farms, or crowded public transportation. They may need to wash themselves, their clothes and their sheet very often to keep body odors to a minimum. They may not tolerate scented soap, shampoo or deodorant (and it’s sometimes difficult to find an unscented one!). They may struggle with the smell of food in general, or with particular smells.

  • Taste: They may be very picky eaters, only tolerating a couple of very bland-tasting food such as mashed potatoes or pasta. They may have difficulty having diverse enough diets with all the nutrients they need. They may always eat the exact same thing.

  • Touch: They may have trouble finding clothing with a texture that they can tolerate. They may need to cut all the tags off their clothing. They may absolutely hate anyone touching them. They may be ok with firm touch, but find light brushy touches painful. They may have trouble wearing specific items of clothing, such as socks/shoes, headphones or hats. They may hate people touching their hair, or find brushing their hair very difficult. They may find brushing their teeth nearly impossible because of the scratching sensation. They may have trouble with the texture of many foods, and be a picky eater because of that.

  • Thermoception: They may be very sensitive to cold, and always wearing loads of clothing and turning the heating up even when other people don’t think it’s that cold. They may be very sensitive to heat, finding summer very hard to cope with, especially if they don’t have access to AC. They may be hyper-aware of tiny changes in temperature, feeling cold when it is dropping and hot when it is rising regardless of the actual temperature.

  • Nociception: They may be more sensitive to pain than most people, and find very painful what most people would shrug off. (They’re not being a drama queen! They really do feel more pain!)

  • Vestibular sense: They may get motion sickness very easily.


And here are some examples for hyposensitivity:

  • Sight: The person may have trouble finding things in visually crowded environments. They may enjoy looking at bright colored lights or at objects in motion (spinning top/twirling fingers…)

  • Hearing: They may not notice being called or being talked to, especially when focused. They may enjoy listening to very loud music, singing, or making lots of noises.

  • Smell: They may not notice smells which other people do. They may enjoy strong smells such as perfume, essential oils or body odor. They may enjoy sniffing a favorite blanket, a significant other, a pet, or anything they like.

  • Taste: They may be able to ingest an impressive amount of spicy food, and may crave strong tasting food (pepper, lemon, salt, sugar…).

  • Touch: They may love rubbing/touching favorite textures, rubbing their hands together… They may love and crave deep pressure, such as having heavy weights on top of them.

  • Thermoception: They may be outside in winter with just a T-shirt, or not be bothered by the heat in summer and even wear a sweater. They may enjoy touching very hot things such as radiators or very hot water, or very cold things like ice cubes or snow.

  • Nociception: They may be less sensitive to pain than most people and not notice it when they’ve been hurt.

  • Vestibular sense: They may love roller coasters, boat rides when there’s a lot of waves… They may never get motion sickness of any sort. They may spend time rocking or like to chill upside down.

  • Kinesthetic sense: They may be very clumsy since they have a poor sense of the position of their body in space. They may stumble a lot and be generally bad at sports. They may have trouble with fine motor skills such as handwriting or sewing. They may enjoy doing repetitive motions such as hand flapping.

  • Interoception: They may have trouble noticing  when they are hungry, thirsty, tired, or when they need to go to the bathroom. They may need to set alarms or to have self-care at set times as part of their routine.


These are of course only examples and hyper or hyposensitivity can express themselves in as many ways are there are people who experience them.

Here are some examples of other sensory differences autistic people can experience:

  • Synesthesia seems more frequent among autistic people than in the general population. It is defined as a transfer from one sensory modality to another: for example, seeing sounds or hearing tastes. It can also mean associating colors or personalities to numbers/letters. In autistic people specifically, it can be a very positive thing (you can now stim with two senses at the same time!) or something painful (these bright lights are awful, well now they’re harsh noises too).

  • We often struggle with processing sensory information, especially speech, which can mean we can have a lot of trouble understanding what people say, might take a lot of time to process speech (which results in conversations such as” “Hey, will you get me this thing please?” “What?” “I said, will-” “Oh yeah, sure”), and might need subtitles to be able to understand movies. Processing information from two different senses at a time can also be difficult, which often translates as “I can either look at the images or understand what’s being said”. This is one of the causes of our struggle with eye contact.

That’s all for today. We hope this helped. We are currently preparing a masterpost on stimming which will be quite related to this one. Happy writing!

Sensory Snapshots

“the five senses” of simple, pleasant moments that capture each sign. 


ARIES IS // Fast legs and faster hearts just as dawn breaks. Numbness from scraped kneecaps and bloodied palms and the dizzying blur of quick sidewalks. Clattering of a chain link fence; dry laughter from desert throats – the kind that rises up from your lungs into your mouth, leaving the rusty taste of adrenaline on the tongue. Smoke lingering in your hair and on your clothes.

TAURUS IS // Standing in the dim light of a warm oven at 2am, messy hair and satin pajamas. Night air dancing in the curtains of an open window. A spoonful of peanut butter thick in your mouth – the sweet of baking cookies fills the room, mixing with the white noise of hushed radio. A gentle hand against the small of your back – an involuntary tugging at the edges of your lips.

GEMINI IS // Bright blue skies and big white clouds. Birds nests tucked in branches, and linens clipped on lines, hanging in an afternoon sun that will plant fresh freckles in ruddy cheeks. The whistle of laughter through gapped teeth. The smell of fresh cut grass from between bare toes, and the stickiness of thumbs wiping the pink and yellow of cotton candy from corners of crooked smiles.

CANCER IS // Early Sunday morning – soft eyes with heavy lids open slow to a familiar room, the walls bathed in shadows and faded lighting. The quiet patter of rain drops against the roof, and the deep rolling thunder. Being surrounded by the soothing scent of home and down feather pillows. The overwhelming comforting weight of blankets draped over tired bones, wrapped tight in the warmth of sleep and rumbling of storms.

LEO IS // Summer kissed skin, big sunglasses and floppy hats. Bright skies over dry fields laced with endless rows of sunflowers – the floral perfume mingling with thick July air. The hot breeze fluttering under a loose tank top, frayed cuffs of denim shorts with holes in the pockets, against your legs. Ripe strawberries in open mouths, the smiling voices of friends singing loud and off key.

VIRGO IS // Crisp, white sheets on a freshly made bed, the corners creased and smoothed down with precision and care. The smell of morning mist and steam rising from the brim of freshly steeped peppermint tea. Ticking analog clocks, rustling papers and the echo of hurried footsteps on wet pavement. The cool glass of a foggy window against your cheek. The quiet hum of waiting.

LIBRA IS // The pink of sunrise filtering through half-open blinds, cast over silk sheets. Opening windows and being greeted by the wafting scents of breakfast and pastries. Tucking hands into the pockets of a new sundress. Sidewalk sounds of birds and bicycle bells and cafe conversations. A thick, creamy smoothie with chunks of fruit stuck in the straw.

SCORPIO IS // The harvest moon, full and round and golden, peaking out from behind clouds that wisp around her like ghosts. The hollowed hooting of owls and sudden rustle of dry leaves. A breeze that raises goosebumps under sweater sleeves. Rich, dark chocolate on your teeth, and lungs full of crisp autumn air – the eerie peaceful of nighttime.

SAGITTARIUS IS // Speeding down an empty road, windows down, wind in your hair and squinting eyes. Crackling bonfires on a river bank, embers dancing as the sun slips behind the horizon. Marshmallows melted to the roofs of mouths – smell of fireworks, and mud on damp skin. The chirping of crickets and boisterous conversations of close friends.

CAPRICORN IS // Midnight all alone – soaking in the almost silence of fresh snowfall. Glowing street lamps illuminating crystallized puffs of breath and streets coated in sparkling, powder white. The burn of hot, black coffee on your tongue and warmth of the cup through knitted mittens on your hands. The still, winter air full of aged evergreen.

AQUARIUS IS // A little shop in your hometown you never noticed before. Dusty books in foreign letters and saturated fabrics, old typewriters and odd lamps. The unique vibration of a phonograph drifts through air that smells like ginger, and something that can’t quite be placed. It leaves spice on the tongue. Tingling of curiosity buzzing under the skin.

PISCES IS // A midday picnic on the beach. Sunshine glittering on the sea, its shore decorated by delicate shells and colored umbrellas. Toes sinking slowly into wet sand as waves wash over them, the rhythmic ebbing and flowing of tides. Distinct scents of sunscreen and sea foam – the sweetness in a juicy mouthful watermelon. The haze of a dreamy day.

Humans are weird Australian space orcs, pt. 2

For some time now, I’ve been considering the possibility that humans have some sense that the other intelligent species don’t.

I mean, just look at the species on Earth: insects can see UV, some reptiles can see infrared, some organisms have no sight at all, some can sense magnetism, etc. It’s not impossible that humans have one or more senses that an alien might not.

While this could apply to any number of senses, I’ve always thought it particularly interesting to contemplate the possibility of a species with no sense of smell.

Smell is something that’s so commonplace among a great number of the species of Earth that many of us overlook it, but it is so critical to how we experience the world. It helps us to remember places, people, and events. We use it to determine whether or not something is safe to eat. It helps us detect impending changes in weather. It tells us if there’s a fire or something giving off dangerous vapours nearby.

Now just imagine some alien species with absolutely no olfactory capability whatsoever. They look around at us inhaling very deliberately through these holes in the middle of our faces and reacting with pleasure, disgust, apprehension, confusion, etc. for no apparent reason. Shoving our faces into flowers, discarding food, acting concerned, reminiscing, doing all manner of things for reasons that are totally beyond their perception.

The 5 Senses of Attraction

Romantic chemistry is all about warm, gooey feelings that gush from the deepest depths of the heart…right? Not quite. Actually, the real boss behind attraction is your brain, which runs through a very quick, very complex series of calculations when assessing a potential partner. 

We know. The idea of so much of our attraction being influenced by chemicals and evolutionary biology can seem cold and scientific rather than romantic. But the next time you see someone you like, try to appreciate how your entire body is playing matchmaker to decide if that beautiful stranger is right for you.

After all, just because the calculations are happening in your brain doesn’t mean those warm, fuzzy feelings are all in your head. In fact, all five of your senses play a role, each able to vote for (or veto) a budding attraction.

#1. Sight

The eyes are the first components in attraction. Many visual beauty standards vary between cultures and eras, but signs of youth, fertility and good health, such as long lustrous hair, or smooth, scar-free skin are almost always in demand because they’re associated with reproductive fitness.

#2. Smell

The nose’s contribution to romance is more than noticing perfume or cologne. It’s able to pick up on natural chemical signals known as pheromones. These not only convey important physical or genetic information about their source but are able to activate a physiological or behavioral response in the recipient.

#3. Hearing

Our ears also determine attraction. Studies have shown that heterosexual men prefer females with high-pitched, breathy voices and wide formant spacing, correlated with smaller body size, while heterosexual women prefer low-pitched voices with a narrow formant spacing that suggest a larger body size.

#4. Touch

And not surprisingly, touch turns out to be crucial for romance. In one experiment, not realizing the study had begun, participants were asked to briefly hold a coffee, either hot or iced. Later, the participants read a story about a hypothetical person and were asked to rate their personality. Those who had held the hot cup of coffee perceived the person in the story as happier, more social, more generous, and better-natured than those who had held the cup of iced coffee, who rated the person as cold, stoic and unaffectionate.

#5. Taste

If a potential mate has managed to pass all these tests, there’s still one more: the infamous first kiss, a rich and complex exchange of tactile and chemical cues, such as the smell of one’s breath and the taste of their mouth. This magic moment is so critical that a majority of men and women have reported losing their attraction to someone after a bad first kiss.

Once attraction is confirmed, your bloodstream is flooded with norepinephrine, activating your fight or flight system. Your heart beats faster, your pupils dilate, and your body releases glucose for additional energy — not because you’re in danger but because your body is telling you that something important is happening. To help you focus, norepinephrine creates a sort of tunnel vision, blocking out surrounding distractions, possibly even warping your sense of time, and enhancing your memory. This might explain why people never forget their first kiss.

HAPPY VALENTINE’S DAY!

From the TED-Ed Lesson The science of attraction - Dawn Maslar

Animation by TOGETHER

Physical and Astral Senses

I’ll start this off by saying there are multiple models in the occult for the physical and Astral senses. This model is the one that rang the most true to my intuition. I found this originally in a book titled The 21 Brotherhood of Light Lessons. The physical senses get information from the physical world, and the Astral ones read information from energy waves and pattens.

Physical Senses and their Astral Counterparts

Touch - The physical sense of touch may be the oldest one we have as living organisms. The Astral counterpart is Psychometry, which allows the seer to sense energy through touch. Typically someone with a developed sense of psychometry can touch an object owned by someone and know much about them.

Taste - This sense is a specialized form of touch that allows us to sense the chemical composition of an object. The Astral counterpart to this sense is Energy Absorption, which allows the seer to intake the energy of other beings and objects. Psychic vampires strive on this sense but never make the full use of it. This sense can allow a user to switch their energy signature through the use of objects like stones, masks, people, animals and even symbols or mental constructs.

Smell - Allows us to sense the chemical composition of something from a short distance. The Astral counterpart to this sense is Aroma Detection, which allows the seer to interpret energy through Astral scents. As funny as it sounds these psychics can smell your soul, smell danger coming, and often find a sweet beautiful taste when experiencing a divine moment.

Hearing - Gives us the ability to sense physical vibrations from a distance. The Astral counterpart is Clairaudience, which grants the seer (or should I say hearer? ;P) the ability to hear Astral sounds, spirits, and at times thoughts. These are the psychics that can hear plants, animals, ghosts, etc…

Sight - Gives us the ability to sense a certain spectrum of light energy interacting with the physical world. The Astral counterpart is Clairvoyance, the ability to see the Astral atmosphere they are in. These people can see forms that relate to the energy of others and objects, receive visions, and generally have an easy time Astral protecting since humans are a very visual animal and having sight in the Astral soon ushers in other senses.

Intuition - We consider this sense to be physical since it doesn’t perceive energy patterns but rather works to predict the physical outcomes of certain situations based on previous experiences and unconscious cues. The Astral counterpart to this sense is Inspiration, which allows one to have an energy signature flow through their whole being, activating relevant thoughts, feelings, memories, desires, etc. This sense guides intuition towards manifesting the inspiring energy.

Telepathy - We will also consider this a physical sense since it works in the physical proximity of other beings. Animals have a highly tuned sense of telepathy and can understand eachother with minimal physical cues. Humans with a strong sense of telepathy are called empaths. The Astral counterpart to this sense is Spiritual Communication which takes telepathy outside the limits of your physical vicinity and can allow for communication between two beings through the Astral, through dreams, or even through thoughts. These people will inspire thoughts and feelings in others simply by being in their presence.

Most people have experienced these Astral senses before but haven’t trained them. We expect these senses to work as well as our physical ones right from the start but this isn’t the case. Just like we have to learn to judge our physical senses through trial and error, we must do the same with the Astral. As babies we touch objects to gain an understanding of how things feel to the touch. We fall a thousand times in our errors of judging distance, and learn to be more perceptive in our sight. We learn that our senses may lie to us, like a beautiful candle flame that pleases the sight but brings pain to the sense of touch if we didn’t yet know that not all beautiful things feel good to all the senses. It is the same with extra-sensory perception. We must train, fail, succeed, misjudge, and eventually learn to make a reasonable assessment based on previous experiences. Just like our physical senses, our Astral ones are not infallible and must be tested in order to learn how to properly interpret the information we receive through them. Accuracy comes with practice.

youtube.com
Scientists discover a sixth sense on the tongue—for water
New study in mice sheds light on how animals stay hydrated Learn more: http://scim.ag/2qyhpSE

Viewed under a microscope, your tongue is an alien landscape, studded by fringed and bumpy buds that sense five basic tastes: salty, sour, sweet, bitter, and umami. But mammalian taste buds may have an additional sixth sense—for water, a new study suggests. The finding could help explain how animals can tell water from other fluids, and it adds new fodder to a centuries-old debate: Does water have a taste of its own, or is it a mere vehicle for other flavors?

Scents of Space
2002
Usman Haque, Josephine Pletts and Dr L Turin
Slade School of Art, 2002.
© Usman Haque
photography by Pletts/Haque and Sam Brooks

You fill up my senses, like a night in the forest, like the mountains in springtime, like a walk in the rain, like a storm in the desert, like a sleepy blue ocean. You fill up my senses, so come fill me again
—  @endlessunicornsauce Annie’s Song