Full moon in Taurus oil going up on the site in a few moments! Created with amber, bitter orange, mango, rose, vetiver and goldstone! This is a truly unique and intoxicating scent. Uplifting, happy, yet grounding and fortifying. A wonderful time to nurture the body inside and out! #eyewalkerelements #perfume #organic #inspiration #iamabundant #fullmoon #taurus #create #senses #treatyourself #thestudiomdr

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This week I was fortunate enough to receive the brand new simplehuman Wide View Sensor Mirror
I had seen a link to this being shared around on Facebook and it instantly piqued my interest! Being a makeup artist, one of my pet hates is poor lighting when it comes to makeup application - particularly at night. So when I read the features of this mirror, I knew I just HAD to review it!!! 

I nearly snapped off the delivery mans arms when I hastily snatched this beauty from him a few days ago. In fact, I often find myself stood at the door mumbling briefly about the product to warrant my erratic excitement when he knocks - I’m sure he’s used to me by now. I hope! 

Anyway, let me give you a little overview as to why this mirror is magic: 
As you can see from the images above, it has 3 wide view panels that are adjustable so you can view it flat or curved. This means you are able to see yourself panoramically from any angle!
So when it comes to checking if my contouring is completely blended I need no longer crane my neck to see the sides of my face, I can now see both sides with ease. The mirror also tilts back and forth so you can adjust it for a more comfortable view. 
In between the three panels are 2 strips of light, known as the tru-lux light system. What makes this light-up mirror different from many others is that it simulates natural sunlight so you can get a true view of your makeup as if you were outside. More on this in a moment! 

Another key feature of the wide view mirror is that it has a built-in sensor. So as your face approaches the mirror the tru-lux light system automatically illuminates without the need to turn it on. Only once you move away does it turn itself off again. It’s a rechargeable device which gives you 3 weeks battery life. And this also means it’s cordless once charged, so yes, you can easily move it from room to room. 

There is more to the tru-lux lighting system that just a sensor and the ability to check your makeup in natural sunlight… It’s the first of it’s kind to be app-enabled!
As soon as it arrived I downloaded the free simplehuman app and wirelessly I was able to control my mirror! I think Tommy had more fun than I did, you know men love a gadget!
You can adjust not only the lighting, but the sensor timings AND set alarms - incase you get swept away in the moment and don’t realise it’s time to leave for work. To alert you the light starts to flash. Cool eh? 

This next part is what REALLY made me long for this mirror…
You can capture the ambient light from different locations using images from your PHONE. Yes.
You simply choose your desired photo - it could be your office, or your favourite restaurant even, and the mirror will mimic the colour temperature and intensity so you can check your makeup in the lighting of the venue before you even leave the house! Gobsmacked….? Tell me about it. 

I will be consciously snapping photos of my favourite places just so I can see my makeup in those lightings - just incase.  
The app is so simple to use. I put in my WiFi code upon request, enabled bluetooth on my phone, it then searched for my mirror and we were connected.

Here is a little snap shot of some foundation swatches in a typical lighting situation vs in front of the tru-lux light system: 

You can see the colours of the foundation in much more clarity. 

This is what the app looks like upon opening. You can see the name of the mirror, the battery life, and options to click on to access light modes, alarms, and sensor settings.

Here is the light modes page within the app. It contains some pre-set light modes: ‘natural light’ ‘candle light’, ‘restaurant’ and ‘cloudy day’. 
The first 5 symbols are pre-sets, and then you have the ‘plus’ button to add your own custom light settings. Below, you can manually adjust the brightness OR you can press auto brightness. 

The mirror itself is quite weighty and extremely sturdy, you can trust that it will not fall over and break. Although it’s a little weighty it’s still portable. You can see from the images above that it’s super slimline and fits beautifully on a dressing table, or even in the bathroom.

It’s ideal for me as I often teach 1-2-1 classes downstairs, and I have a filming room upstairs, so I can easily cart it back and forth. 

Here is a little mobile snap of me and my magic mirror:

The mirror retail prices are as follows:
£299.99 here in the UK
$400.00 in the US
€399.99 in the EU

It’s currently available on the UK & US sites, and will be available on the German & French websites by the end of the week!

If you have any questions feel free to ask!

Stretchy Prosthetic Skin Feels Pressure, Temperature

by Txchnologist staff

Researchers in South Korea and the U.S. have developed what they call a “smart” prosthetic skin embedded with heat, humidity and pressure sensors that can relay sensations to the wearer. 

They say their stretchy silicone-based material can recreate the feelings of temperature and mechanical strain and pressure through electrodes that stimulate the wearer’s nerves. They argue their integrated device represents the next generation of prosthetic skin research by making previously rigid or semi-flexible sensors soft.

“Recent advances in the design of prosthetic limbs integrated with rigid and/or semi-flexible tactile sensors provide sensory reception to enable feedback in response to variable environments,” the team write in the paper reporting their work published today in the journal Nature Communications. "However, there still exists a mechanical mismatch between conventional electronics in wearable prosthetics and soft biological tissues, which impede the utility and performance of prosthetics in amputee populations.“

Keep reading

Our bodies have five senses: touch, smell, taste, sight, hearing. But not to be overlooked are the senses of our souls: intuition, peace, foresight, trust, empathy. The differences between people lie in their use of these senses; most people don’t know anything about the inner senses while a few people rely on them just as they rely on their physical senses, and in fact probably even more.

C. JoyBell C.

Cranial Nerves

Nerves supplying the body can be divided in to cranial and spinal. Cranial nerves emerge from the brain or brain stem and spinal from the spinal chord. There are 12 pairs of cranial nerves. They are components of the peripheral nervous system, with the exception of the optic nerve, as their axons extend beyond the brain to supply other parts of the body. They are named numerically from region of the nose (rostral) to back of the head (caudal). Here’s a brief overview of all twelve nerves and their basic functions.

I – The Olfactory Nerve. The cells of this nerve arise from the olfactory membrane of the nasal mucosa. The dendrites of the nerve cells project in to the olfactory mucosa. The axons of these cells combine to form the olfactory nerve. They join the brain at the olfactory bulb, located at the end nearest the nose. The fibres are short and lie deep and protected from casual injury. It is often found that loss or interference of sense of smell is due to blockage of the air passage leading to the olfactory mucosa, not due to nerve damage.

II – The Optic Nerve. This nerve connects the retina to the diencephalon of the brain. It is the only cranial nerve considered to be part of the central nervous system. This means the fibres are incapable of regeneration, hence why damage to the optic nerve produces irreversible blindness. Interestingly the eye's blind spot is a result of the absence of photoreceptor cells in the area of the retina where the optic nerve leaves the eye. I find the optic nerves easy to spot when looking at the brain from below as they form the optic chiasm. This is the point at which they cross and forms a clear ‘x’.

III- The Oculomotor Nerve. This nerve controls most of the eye’s movements including the constriction of the pupil and levitation of the eyelid. Damage to the nerve can cause double vision and inability to open the eye. A symptom of damage to this nerve is tilting of the head.

IV – The Trochlear Nerve. This nerve is a small somatic motor nerve and innervates the dorsal oblique muscle of the eye, responsible for allowing the eye to look down and up as well as internal rotations. Damage to the nerve can cause one eye to drift upwards in relation to the undamaged eye, meaning patients tilt their heads down to compensate.

V – The Trigeminal Nerve. This is the largest cranial nerve and is so called as it has three major divisions. It is sensory to the skin and deeper tissue of the face and motor to certain facial muscles, playing a large role in mastication.

VI – The Abducent Nerve. This nerve controls the movement of the lateral rectus muscle of the eye. It also plays a role in eye retraction for protection. Injury produces the inability to deviate the eyeball away from the midline of the body.

VII – The Facial Nerve. This nerve innervates the muscles of facial expression. It also functions in the conveyance of taste sensations from the front two thirds of the tongue. As well as this it can increase saliva flow through certain salivary glands.

VIII – The Vestibulocochlear Nerve. This nerve is named after the vestibular and cochlear components of the inner ear. It transmits information on sound and balance. Damage can lead to deafness, impaired balance and dizziness.

IX – The Glossopharyngeal Nerve. This nerve has any roles including the innervation of certain muscles of the palate of the mouth, certain salivary glands and the sensory mucosa of the root of the tongue, palate and pharynx. Damage can lead to difficulty swallowing as well as the loss of ability to taste bitter and sour things in humans.

X – The Vagus Nerve. This is a very important nerve and one frequently discussed when considering many important systems within the body. It is the longest of all cranial nerves and extends to supply the pancreas, spleen, kidneys, adrenals, and intestine. It has parasympathetic control of the heart and digestive tract as well as certain glands and involuntary muscles.

XI – The Accessory Nerve. This plays a role in neck turning and elevation of the scapula (shoulder). Muscle atrophy of the shoulder region indicates damage to this nerve.

XII – The Hypoglossal Nerve. This nerve’s name relates to the fact that is runs under the tongue, innervating the tongue’s internal and external musculature. It has important roles in speech, food manipulation and swallowing.