sensationalism

** lyrics from strovi’s Execution Girl !! **

So judging by how Tsubomi and her friends were talking about gossip outside of school, and how eager her friends were to catch her in an embarrassing state (ch.94.01), I think it’s possible that there is some kind of low key rivalry and resentment between some of the girls. And if this were the case, it’d make sense for Tsubomi to be the main target, her being the school’s idol after all,,

Anywayy, realistically, I don’t think it’d be as dramatic as I depicted it in my art, I just really like exaggerating things lol

how huffington post advertises the interview:

                                                         vs


times Sam Smith actually discusses his relationship to labels in the interview:

anonymous asked:

The amount of negative feedback from the Netflix series that's coming out (Dear White People) is very alarming.

It’s hilarious to me! There’s so much coddling to white audiences when it comes to telling stories of the experiences of black people, it’s time they get to tell a very honest story. I watched the movie this show is based off of and could not BELIEVE one of the colleges showcased at the end of the movie that had a party where students wore blackface was the University of Florida, in MY OWN TOWN. Some people need to have these stories told, because sadly it isn’t really sensationalized, and a mirror needs to be held up to us to reveal our privilege and our internalized racism that we must continuously work to improve.

in light of every conjured up caricature, label and narrative about taylor swift that the media and public have sensationally fictionalised for a decade, she hasn’t allowed their disheartening, harsh remarks to seep into the parts of her that breathe strength, determination and resilience. she’s owning her narrative, whilst courage and self-assurance course through her veins.

she’s taken pain, mockery and nonsensical labels, and she’s admirably transformed them into an empowering, iconic and creative work of art. the success of lwymmd and it’s obliteration of records is wholly a testament to her artistry. she’s rising onward and upward, and we’re all cheering you and your 27.7 million views in 18 hours on, taylor.

nonblack gay men, especially the white ones, stay appropriating shit black women created and sensationalized (prime examples, aave and twerking) then have the audacity to claim that shit as a part of their “culture” like………..sis……………..

PENTAGRAM/PENTACLE DEFINED FOR BEGINNER WICCANS

Symbols are constantly recycled in society and religion. Their meanings evolve over time and can differ from belief system to belief system. A pentacle/pentagram is one of those symbols that has picked up a whole lot of baggage over the years. Beginner Wiccans often come to our religion having to ‘reprogram’ their own way of thinking about the pentagram. For years, pop culture, media hysteria and other religions have drilled the idea into our heads that Pagan symbols are bad, and the pentagram is evil.

Unfortunately, in a lot of books aimed at Wicca for beginners, more misinformation about the pentagram is spread. This time, it errs on the side of trying to make the pentagram look good, attaching to it all kinds of romanticized ideas that are just not factual.

What is a pentagram? What is a pentacle? Is there a difference? Let’s have a closer look at the history of this symbol, and the meaning of the pentagram today.

WHAT IS A PENTAGRAM?

A good place to begin anytime you’re trying to understand a word and its usage is to hit the dictionary and look up the entomology of the word. The word pentagram is rooted in the Greek.

Instead of giving you my own interpretations, I’ll take the meaning directly from the dictionary:

MEANING OF A PENTAGRAM: A BRIEF HISTORY

The earliest use of the pentagram we know of is from ancient Sumeria– but it wasn’t a religious Pagan symbol. It was a word in their language that meant a corner or angle (due to the 5 sharp angles in the figure).

In the 6th century BCE, Pherecydes of Syros used it to illustrate the five recesses of the cosmology. Pentagram figures occasionally turned up in the far East as well, due to the 5 Chinese elements: wood, fire, earth, metal, water.

Pythagoras went on to use the pentagram as the symbol of man. Partly it was because the shape represented a human standing with his arms spread wide (the top point being the head, the to outer points the arms, and the bottom two points the legs). It was also considered to represent the 5 elements that the Greeks believed made up the physical body: Earth (matter), Air (breath), Fire (energy), Water (fluids) and Aether (the psyche or soul). When Pythagoras’ school was driven underground, students used the pentagram as a secret symbol to identify each other.

In ancient Judaism it was a symbol found in mysticism, related to the top portion of the Tree of Life in the Kabbalah, it stood for the 5 books of the Torah (what Christians refer to as the Pentateuch in the Old Testament of the Bible) and the symbol was featured in a seal representing the secret names of God.

Early Christians into the middle ages used the pentagram heavily as a symbol for Christ’s five wounds. The star of Bethlehem that lead the wise men to the baby Jesus was believed to be the pentagram. In Authorial legends, you’ll often see the symbol of the Pentagram inscribed on knight’s shields and other things—these were actually Christian, not Pagan, references. Christians thought of the pentagram as a protective amulet, and it was the primary symbol of Christianity back then, even more common than the cross.

So the pentagram had a long, ancient history of uses as a Pagan symbol and Judeo-Christian symbol. It had no single meaning. It represented perfection in mathematics, the human body, words, and was also used in religious ritual and magic.

BUT WHAT ABOUT WITCHES, WICCANS, AND SATANISTS?

So I’ve mentioned that just about everyone had used the pentagram back then, except I haven’t mentioned Witches, Wiccans and Satanists. What about them?

The fact is, they didn’t really exist yet. The only “witches” at the time were the kind of folklore and rumor. Oh, don’t get me wrong—there were people who did magick, but they would not have identified with the term “witch”.

WHEN THE PENTAGRAM BECAME ASSOCIATED WITH “EVIL”

The 14th and 15th century saw the rise of occult practices that were rooted in Judeo-Christian symbolism and mysticism, and they borrowed liberally from many of the symbols, including the pentagram. They also borrowed from Gnostic and Paganism symbols. It’s no small surprise Ceremonial Magicians were accused by the Christian church of heresy. And heresy, to a medieval Christian, barrels down to Paganism, Satan worship and witchcraft.

Anything liberally used by Ceremonial Magicians became associated with anything considered heretical. If you don’t want to be associated with such things, you don’t use their symbols.

By Victorian times, the witch hunt craze was ending, and people started to forget how pentagrams were once very common, prominent Christian symbols. It’s now associated with paganism, Satan and witchcraft, and seen as an evil symbol.

The love of romanticized myth and history drive a new movement: the Pagan revival, and the pentagram gets turned around again. This is where it gets confusing, because misinformation and false histories begin to fly liberally from the late 19th to mid-20th century.

This is the time the Pagan Revival begins (mostly a re-invention than a re-construction of “Old Ways”). This is when Margaret Murray published her theories on ancient Witch cults being peaceful Pagan religions—though her works have been completely debunked since. This is when Gerald Gardner founded Wicca, and people came crawling out of the woodwork claiming to be ‘hereditary Witches’, or claiming their coven was ancient, or claiming some unbroken line to the Pagan religions of antiquity. This is also when a few ‘reverse Christian’ groups popped up, with practices specifically designed to mock and rebel against Christianity (those these groups were pretty rare and the NeoPagan community did their best to distance themselves from such groups).

One thing most of these groups have in common, though, is that they adopt the pentagram.

Hollywood – new on the scene in the mid-20th century – adopts the pentagram as well. Hollywood is not interested in accuracy; it’s interested in the shock value of things. They adopt it as a symbol for evil magic and reverse-Christian style devil worship and stick it into just about every horror movie conceivable. This fuels the antics of a lot of bored, rebellious people, particularly teens, who like to spray paint it on park walls and carve it into trees for the shock value.

By the late 20th century, the pentagram is being used and abused all over the place, but it is Hollywood who manages to make an indelible imprint on the social consciousness—and this is further driven by the media with sensationalized reporting during the 1970’s “Satanic Ritual Abuse” hysteria (which has also been debunked).

It’s only the tail end of the 20th century and the beginning of the 21st century in which the pentagram is finally gaining some understanding. Though mainstream society hasn’t completely lost the ‘kneejerk reaction’ to it, the growth of the Pagan Revival and the availability of information via the Internet have helped to quell some of the shock value and fears over it.

WICCAN SYMBOLS: PENTAGRAM VS. PENTACLE

More misconceptions abound, considering the Pagan community more commonly refers to the symbol as a ‘pentacle’ rather than a ‘pentagram’. Many books and websites have tried (and failed) to make the distinction clear. Some assertions I’ve read in passing are:

  • The pentagram is evil with one point down
  • the pentacle is good with one point up
  • The pentagram is just the star
  • the pentacle is the star with a circle around it
  • The pentagram is 2-D; the pentacle is 3-D

Actually, all of these answers would be technically incorrect. If you look at the definitions provided above, pentagram and pentacle are synonymous, and have nothing to do with which way the points face, or whether or not they have a circle around them.                           

A look at the dictionary’s answer to pentacle and you see that the only real difference is one is derived from the Greek, the other from the Latin:

DICTIONARY MEANING OF A PENTACLE:

THE PENTACLE: NOT JUST A FIGURE, BUT A TOOL

A tool arose out of ceremonial magic. This tool was a flat, round disc or paper that was inscribed with protective symbols (a pentagram could be inscribed on it, but there were other symbols they used as well). It is used as an amulet of warding and power because a large part of Ceremonial Magic is invoking and commanding various entities from Judeo-Christian beliefs.

It was called the pentacle or sometimes pantacle. On the Tarot (a Christian-origin divination system), the symbol is used for the suit of coins, and it represents the Element of Earth.

Wicca and other NeoPagan religions borrowed this tool from Ceremonial Magic. They kept the name, but re-defined its purpose since Wiccans don’t believe in Judeo-Christian entities and is not concerned with calling or commanding spirits.

The pentacle (the disc) was adopted as an altar tool, and is used to symbolize the Element of Earth on the altar. It’s also used as a tool for placing sacred items upon it when cleansing, consecrating or charging them.

The Wiccan symbol of choice for this round disc was the pentagram/pentacle. To further confuse things, this tool does not have to be inscribed with a pentagram/pentacle.

TYPICAL MEANING OF A PENTAGRAM/PENTACLE IN WICCA

As far as Wiccan symbols go, the pentagram isn’t a representation of good vs. evil. It’s a symbol of our faith, a symbol of the 5 Elements (one for each point), and the circle (the universe) contains and connects them all. No matter which way it’s facing, circle or no circle, there’s nothing ‘bad’ about it.

Another misconception about the pentagram in Wicca is which way it points. Again, you will find common misinformation that says the pentagram is “evil” if point down and “good” if point up. The point down is most commonly associated with Satanism, because the largest branch of Satanism (Church of Satan, est. 1966) adopted the inverted pentagram with a goat head inside of it as their symbol.

It’s traditionally used both point up and point down. Point up pentagrams are more common; but point down pentagrams are not considered evil at all.

The point-up pentagram represents the spirit ascending above matter. The top point represents the Element of Spirit, the other four points represent the four Spiritual Elements.

When a pentagram is point-down, it represents spirit descending into matter. This is most traditionally used in lineage covens during second degree initiations, because it’s at this point of one’s spiritual path that one turns “inward”. You face and challenge your ‘dark side’ – your base emotions, fears, ignorance, prejudices, etc., you deal with them and develop mastery over yourself.

How to be a friend to someone with DID

Whether your friend has just told you they have DID, or you’ve known for a long time, there are right and wrong ways to approach situations with them. Talk to your friend for specifics about them, this absolutely won’t apply to everyone but is a good place to start!

-Treat them like a human, like a person worthy of respect. Never ridicule, sensationalize, or dehumanize them.

-Understand that severe early childhood trauma causes DID, and that it’s likely not appropriate to ask for any details. Don’t press your friend for information, but be available to listen if you can.

-Understand that switching alters is often difficult to detect and you may not be able to distinguish them. Talk to your friend for specifics on how you should react.

-Know that dissociation is at the core of DID, and your friend will likely experience confusion, memory issues, and other dissociative symptoms. These are also not okay to mock and it is never okay to take advantage of these symptoms.

-As with any friend, know that you are entitled to time to yourself and space. People with DID have suffered through far more than anyone should have to, and may come across as “negative.” Support and care for them! Know that you should also be supported and that it’s okay to have space when you need it.

-Anon pointed out also that you shouldn’t assume you have the same friendship with all members of the system. Your friend may seem very distant or not remember things about you; please do not take offense to this. You can definitely try to befriend the entire system, but recognize that they are all complex individuals and you will likely have very mixed results. 

Communication is the most important thing!

  • heathers, both the movie and the musical: a black comedy, but still a commentary against the glamorization and sensationalization of suicide by media and fellow peers, the uselessness and apathy of adults in position of power to help children when their struggles in their most critical moments, the senselessness of violence in solving problems, and how environments like highschool can become so awful because of how people feel compelled to become a part of it instead of trying to change their world. but ultimately it is better to be alive than dead, to reject the idea of confronting your peers and problems with violence, and instead chose to change your world by being kind to one another
  • people who should get gold stars for missing the point: "yeah but how cool was it when JD murdered the cool kids?"

anonymous asked:

I have a lesbian who is hunted by a monster for much of my book, and I've been avoiding it (she only barely escapes at first) but I think she needs to die. How do I do it tactfully? She's not the only lgbt main char but I want to do her justice

The Bury Your Gays Breakdown, from a Super Mysterious Assistant

Alright!  First, in case it’s helpful for anyone reading, I’m going to go into “should she die?”  It sounds like you’re pretty settled on that, but bear with me for a minute here.

So you want to kill your lesbian (or otherwise not-staight-and-cis) character!

The first thing you should consider is, does she have to die?  If so, why?  Is it the logical conclusion of her character arc to die?  Is there no other possible way the plot could be resolved?  If you can’t answer “yes” to one or both of those, you might want to reconsider killing her.  (If the answer to “why does she need to die?” is “so her girlfriend is single again and can be paired with another character” then you really want to reconsider, because it will not look good and there will be backlash.)

The second thing to consider is, do you have other living representation?  This is pretty simple: if you only have one lesbian character, killing her is more of a problem, because then you’re killing 100% of your lesbian characters.  If you have five lesbian characters, killing one-who is now 20% of your lesbian characters-isn’t as big an issue.  Keep in mind, you also want to consider how significant these other characters are: if you kill off a major lesbian character, you need other major lesbian characters to balance it out; minor characters who have two lines in the entire book don’t count, even if they’re lesbians.  (Whether other LGBT characters count is a bit of a gray area.  If you have one lesbian character who dies, but a bisexual, a transgender, a gay, and an ace character that live, it’s not quite as good as having several living lesbian characters, but it’s better than only having living straight-and-cis characters.)

So you’ve decided you have a good reason to kill your lesbian character, and your story won’t be bereft of any living representation when you do?  Let’s talk about how to kill her well!

The first rule is, however your character dies, it should not have to do with her being a lesbian.  She should not be seduced by a woman who turns out to be an assassin (or vampire) and murders her.  She should not run into Zeus, who kills her for refusing him.  She should, probably, not be shot and killed by a stray bullet, although five years from now that one might be okay.  What kills her should be just as likely (historically, in both media and real life, as well as logically) to kill anyone else.

The second rule is, her death has to be the result of her choice.  She shouldn’t die because someone else decided to kill her, and she didn’t have enough plot armor to stop them.  She should die because she made a decision-maybe not rational, maybe not fully aware of the risks, but her own decision-and that decision directly resulted in her death.  She stepped in front of the charging mook to protect the hero while he finished the spell that will save the world, or she decided to cross the canyon on the rickety bridge as a shortcut, and it broke when she was halfway across.

The third rule is, her death has to matter to the plot.  This one is a little hard to pin down, because “the plot” is such a variable thing, but the general idea is: imagine if, instead of dying, your lesbian character got exasperated with these idiots she’s been hanging around with, bought a bus ticket to California, and lived out the rest of her life in happy plot-free-land.  Would the rest of your story go the same way, minor details (such as a mention of her) aside?  Then there is a problem.  If, however, whatever she does while or because she’s dying, or what she does that results in her death, changes the direction of the plot, then her death matters.

Now, one last thing: if you do all this, your reader, or listeners, or watchers, will still be upset.  But if they’re upset because a favorite character of theirs died, rather than because another lesbian was killed for no purpose but sensationalism, then you’ve done your job well.

secret-agent-boo  asked:

Hiii I was wondering if you knew of any accurate animal documentaries. I know most nature documentaries sensationalize things but I was hoping to find one more truthful. Thanks!

you really can’t go wrong with any David Attenborough documentaries. And there’s so many of them that you can’t run out.

Originally posted by dontgifadamn

But some other great ones:

For anyone about to have a hospital visit or surgery:
  • If this is your first hospitalization–or even if it’s not!–remember that you are in good hands.  Doctors help thousands of patients every day, and you are no exception.  You are safe.

  • If you’re having surgery on any area of the torso (especially on an organ), bring a soft pillow or stuffed animal with you beforehand.  I know some hospitals provide this, but it’s always nice to have a backup.  Even with pain meds, you may cough or sneeze at any point, and gently hugging this cushion can work wonders in lessening pain!

  • Medical scars are not ugly.

  • Do not be afraid to ask for companionship.  You deserve company in a time that may be scary for you!  Some friends and family may be looking for your approval before they visit in the first place, so don’t be afraid to reach out.

  • And that goes for the reverse too!  If you’d rather have your own space, it’s not rude to say so at all.  You are under no obligation to entertain guests while you’re trying to recover!  If you need to be alone, you can.

  • If something hurts, say so.  I don’t know why the concept of the “hospital superhuman” is so sensationalized when pain medicine is literally there to help you! If the pain’s a 10, don’t downplay it as a 2. You are brave enough just for doing what you’re doing; forcing yourself to be in prolonged pain isn’t necessary. 

  • If a doctor approves it, popsicles are a good starting point for easy-to-stomach foods that also taste nice.

  • There is no shame in needing a bedpan, a catheter, or assistance showering or using the restroom.  You are not weak.  You are recovering.

  • You can do this.
  • ☉ Sun: EMPIRICISM- knowledge from experience
  • ☽ Moon: OCCULTISM- knowledge of the hidden and paranormal
  • ☿ Mercury: TRANSCENDENTALISM- the power of mental essence
  • ♀ Venus: MYSTICISM- union of one with the infinite
  • ♂ Mars: VOLUNTARISM- will is the force behind everything
  • ♃ Jupiter: LOGICISM- everything is reducible to logic
  • ♄ Saturn: GNOSIS- insight into one's Divine nature and earthly existence
  • ♈ Aries: IDEALISM- fundamentally mental & mentally constructed
  • ♉ Taurus: RATIONALISM- knowledge is sourced through reason
  • ♊ Gemini: MATHEMATISM- everything can be reduced to numbers.
  • ♋ Cancer: MATERIALISM- matter is the fundamental substance in nature
  • ♌ Leo: SENSATIONALISM- sensations are reality
  • ♍ Virgo: PHENOMENALISM- physical objects are only perceptual phenomena
  • ♎ Libra: REALISM- knowledge is only an approximation of reality
  • ♏ Scorpio: DYNAMISM- All phenomena is a manifestation of force/power
  • ♐ Sagittarius: MONADISM- reality is compound of indivisible entities
  • ♑ Capricorn: SPIRITISM- all physical beings are affected by incorporeal beings
  • ♒ Aquarius: PNEUMATISM- the manifestation of spiritual gifts from the universe
  • ♓ Pisces: PSYCHISM- all beings are animated by a fluid, universal essence

One of the major obstacles is that there continues to be, in the media and the general public, this trivialization and sensationalization of ADHD as an overblown problem that’s being over-treated.
But, as we’re understanding more and more, this is a serious chronic problem that begins in childhood and persists into adulthood.

For example, in our study, 80% of those individuals with persisting ADHD had other mental health diagnoses. And even for those whose ADHD didn’t persist, 47% still had another psychiatric diagnosis.

We have got to create a system that’s designed to treat ADHD as chronic health issue, not just a kid disorder.

—  William Barbaresi, MD, Director of the Developmental Medicine Center at Boston Children’s Hospital 

tw: ed mentions

OKAY SO for those who don’t know i had an eating disorder and am currently recovering. and this is relevant because after over a day of mental preparation, i watched To The Bone on Netflix

for those who don’t know pt 2- To The Bone is basically a movie about a girl with anorexia, and a couple other kids with different eds.

you see, that already had me concerned because, you know, Netflix made 13 Reasons Why and I don’t need to go into detail about that. So I watched it today to make sure it was done right, I guess? Basically to make sure it wasn’t A Mess.

And I’m here to tell you that, in my opinion, To The Bone was a great movie. 

I did some research about it beforehand and I learned that a lot of people who were part of the production (writers/actors/etc) have had EDs, and that a lot of the movie was based off of true events. This already puts To The Bone under different circumstances when compared to 13rw, and I was incredibly happy about that when I did my research. Although, of course, a part of me was still worried.

But, like I said, it turned out to be a great movie. But before I write down what I liked about the movie, I need to put it out there that it is, indeed, an incredibly triggering movie (which is why I needed a day of preparation before watching it) so please don’t watch it if you feel you’ll be badly triggered.

Now, onto why I liked To The Bone:

  • They had a trigger warning before the movie. I absolutely hated the strong lack of trigger warnings in 13rw, so I was really happy to see that there was a warning before the movie (where they also mentioned that people involved in making the movie have had EDs)
  • Lily Collins. Honestly this doesn’t even need to be explained. Also her character was incredibly blunt and idk I liked her character a lot
  • They didn’t romanticize eating disorders. This was incredibly important to me. How they showed and described eds were, in my opinion, very accurate and so incredibly blunt and real. They showed what I refer to as the ugly parts of having an eating disorder, and I was really happy about that. It showed that eds aren’t diets, trends, and how it’s not always about getting skinny (there’s a part where they talked about this and I cried because it was just so true and I was so thankfu for that)
  • The sister relationship is just so sweet and real. Like, it’s hard to explain without giving too much spoilers and this is more on the personal side but I really love the moments when the sisters were talking (another part where I cried) because I’m personally really close to my brother and yeah
  • One of the characters is a boy recovering from an ed. This was really important to me because I feel like some people don’t realize that boys can get eating disorders.
  • It ends on a good note, but not after some shit goes down. I liked this because, again, it felt real. It wasn’t some magical happy ending or anything, but it was a good ending that happened after some struggle, which is how it is in real life. 
  • I cried a lot because, like what I’ve been saying a lot in this post, it felt real. It didn’t feel like a sensationalized ed movie that’s “fake deep” or anything, it was very raw to me. It had scenes that may seem too blunt or shocking to other people who never had an ed, but to me they were relatable. And this movie is now very dear to my heart.

In short: I liked To The Bone a lot and I wanna thank everyone who worked on it because I really love how it turned out and yall did *not* pull a 13 reasons why