sen. susan collins

Call on Your Senator and Demand they Defeat Trumpcare

The Senate is planning to vote on (and pass) Trumpcare before the July 4th recess. Indivisible advises that you call your Senator and ask to speak to their Health Legislative Assistant, then ask that they vote NO on Trumpcare.

The swing votes below:

Sen. Lisa Murkowski (AK) - HLA, Morgan Griffin (202) 224-6665
Sen. Cory Gardner (CO) - HLA, Alison Toal (202) 224-5941
Sen. Bill Cassidy (LA) - HLA, Matt Gallivan (202) 224-5824
Sen. Susan Collins (ME) - HLA, Amy Pellegrino (202) 224-2523
Sen. Dean Heller (NV) - HLA, Rachel Green (202) 224-6244
Sen. Rob Portman (OH) - HLA, Sarah Schmidt (202) 224-3353
Sen. Shelley Moore Capito (WV) - HLA, Dana Richter (202) 224-6472

Here's a list of every US senator that does — and doesn't — pay interns

You can’t get a job without experience, but you also can’t get the experience without a job.

A group called Pay Our Interns is trying to help end the practice of unpaid internships — starting on Capitol Hill. On Tuesday, the group rolled out a database of paid internships in the U.S. Senate. 

Mic took this list and then followed up with senators’ offices to confirm the accuracy of the database and include senators that pay interns but were left off the original list.

U.S. senators currently accepting applications for paid internships (24 total)

Democrats/Independents  

• Delaware Sen. Tom Carper offers summer interns a stipend but not interns in the spring and fall. The deadline is April 21. 

• Hawaii Sen. Brian Schatz's team pays all interns, a spokesman confirmed with Mic via email. Applications are rolling.

• Hawaii Sen. Mazie Hirono offers travel assistance to some interns that qualify. The deadline is March 31. 

• Indiana Sen. Joe Donnelly has two paid legislative internships, the Wayne Townsend and Frank J. Anderson Legislative Programs, which pay a stipend, a spokesman told Mic in an email. The other internships are unpaid. 

• Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren offers small stipends to applicants not receiving college credit for the internship based on need. The deadline is March 15.

• Nebraska Sen. Heidi Heitkamp pays all interns. Applications are considered on a rolling basis. 

• New Mexico Sen. Martin Heinrich pays all interns $12 per hour. The deadline to apply for the summer is March 31.

• New Mexico Sen. Tom Udall’s website says internships are unpaid, but a spokesperson told Mic in an email that interns are either compensated through an outside foundation or a stipend of roughly $10 per hour.

• Ohio Sen. Sherrod Brown offers “some limited financial assistance based on need,” which students can request when they submit their applications, according to a spokeswoman.

• Oregon Sen. Jeff Merkley offers the Otto and Verdell Rutherford Congressional Internship, a $5,000 stipend for students who couldn’t otherwise afford the opportunity, based on need. The deadline to apply is March 15.

• Pennsylvania Sen. Bob Casey offers two special paid internships in addition to several other opportunities, which are all unpaid. The deadline is March 15.

• Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders pays all interns $12 per hour. The deadline to apply for the summer is March 17.

• Virginia Sen. Tim Kaine offers stipends to students who do not receive school credit, a spokeswoman confirmed in an email. The deadline is April 14. 

Republicans 

• Alaska Sen. Lisa Murkowski has an internship program for college students and high-school seniors; both get modest stipends. Deadline is March 16.

• Arizona Sen. Jeff Flake offers two kinds of internships: personal office and judiciary internships. Judiciary interns are paid, a spokesman confirmed to Mic in an email; however, office interns are not.

• Colorado Sen. Cory Gardner’s website lists no compensation information regarding interns, but he has posted a job listing for a paid internship with his re-election campaign. A spokesperson didn’t respond to multiple requests for clarification.

• Kansas Sen. Pat Roberts pays interns a monthly stipend. Applications are due on March 17. 

• Kentucky Sen. Rand Paul offers either a stipend or college credit to interns. The deadline is March 10.

• Maine Sen. Susan Collins pays interns, according to a 2013 report by the Atlantic, but her campaign site does not list details. A spokesperson for her office didn’t respond to multiple requests for confirmation.

• North Dakota Sen. John Hoeven pays all interns a stipend. Applications close on March 15.

• Oklahoma Sen. Jim Inhofe offers stipends to summer interns but not interns in the spring and fall. The deadline is March 15.

• South Carolina Sen. Tim Scott’s summer interns are unpaid, according to an email from a spokeswoman, but fall and spring interns are paid if their school does not offer credit. 

• Utah Sen. Mike Lee pays all interns a stipend, a press officer confirmed with Mic in an email. You can apply on a rolling basis through his website.

• Wyoming Sen. John Barrasso gives each intern a monthly stipend to help with living expenses. The deadline is March 19.

U.S. senators who have already closed applications for paid internships (18 total) 

Democrats 

• Vermont Sen. Patrick Leahy offers stipends to some interns, but they are not guaranteed, according to his site.

Republicans 

• Alaska Sen. Dan Sullivan pays interns a small stipend, but applications for this summer are closed.

• Arizona Sen. John McCain pays his interns, but applications are now closed. 

• Idaho Sen. Jim Risch pays interns, but the applications for the summer are now closed.

• Arkansas Sen. Tom Cotton pays some qualified interns a stipend if they are not receiving academic credit, a spokeswoman confirmed in an email to Mic, but applications for this summer are currently closed.

• Idaho Sen. Mike Crapo pays all interns, but applications for the summer are now closed. 

• Kansas Sen. Jerry Moran pays all full-time interns, but the applications for the summer are now closed. 

• Maine Sen. Angus King pays all full-time interns in his office, a spokesman for his office confirmed in an email.

• Mississippi Sen. Thad Cochran offers stipends.

• Mississippi Sen. Roger Wicker pays all interns a stipend.

• Missouri Sen. Mitch McConnell pays all interns a stipend.
• Nebraska Sen. Deb Fischer pays fall interns but not summer interns. Applications for summer are now closed. 

• Nebraska Sen. Ben Sasse pays all interns a stipend, according to a representative from his office who confirmed this to Mic by email. Applications for summer closed March 1.

• North Carolina Sen. Richard Burr pays a stipend to spring and fall interns but not interns who work during the summer, according to the Atlantic. His press office did not immediately respond to a request for clarification. Applications for the spring are now closed, but applications for the summer are still open.

• South Dakota Sen. Mark Rounds pays all interns a stipend, but applications for the summer are now closed. Applications for fall are due May 1.

• South Dakota Sen. John Thune pays interns a monthly stipend based on available funds, but applications are now closed. 

• Utah Sen. Orrin Hatch pays the summer interns in his D.C. office a “modest stipend,” but interns in his state office are part-time and unpaid.  

• Wyoming Sen. Mike Enzi pays interns $1,600 to help cover the costs of living in D.C, but applications closed March 9th.

U.S. senators that do not pay their interns (50 total)

Democrats  

• California Sen. Dianne Feinstein’s interns are unpaid, according to her Senate website. A spokesperson didn’t immediately respond to a request for comment. 

• Colorado Sen. Michael Bennet’s Senate website says that internships are on a “voluntary basis” and that “no stipend is provided.” News reports also indicate the interns are unpaid. His office did not respond to request for comment. 

• Connecticut Sen. Chris Murphy’s interns are unpaid, according to his Senate website. A spokeswoman confirmed this was the case in an email to Mic

• Connecticut Sen. Richard Blumenthal’s interns are unpaid, according to his Senate website. A spokeswoman didn’t immediately respond to request for comment.

• Delaware Sen. Chris Coons does not compensate interns, according to his Senate website. A spokesperson for his office didn’t immediately respond to a request for comment.  

• Florida Sen. Bill Nelson’s interns are unpaid, according to his Senate website. A spokesperson confirmed this in an email to Mic

• Illinois Sen. Dick Durbin’s interns are unpaid, according to his Senate website. A spokeswoman confirmed this to Mic in an email.

• Maryland Sen. Ben Cardin’s interns are unpaid, a spokesman confirmed in an email to Mic

• Massachusetts Sen. Ed Markey’s interns are unpaid, according to the Atlantic report, former alumni testimonials, and a job listing. A spokesperson didn’t immediately respond to request for comment.

• Michigan Sen. Gary Peters’s interns are unpaid, according to his Senate website. A spokeswoman didn’t immediately respond to request for comment. 

• Michigan Sen. Debbie Stabenow’s interns are unpaid, according to her Senate website. Her office didn’t immediately respond to a request for comment. 

• Minnesota Sen. Al Franken’s interns are unpaid, according to his Senate website. A spokesman confirmed this to Mic in an email.

• Minnesota Sen. Amy Klobuchar’s interns are unpaid, according to her Senate website. A spokesman didn’t immediately respond to request for comment. 

• Missouri Sen. Claire McCaskill’s interns are unpaid, according to her Senate website. A spokeswoman didn’t immediately respond to a request for comment. 

• Montana Sen. Jon Tester’s interns are unpaid, according to his Senate site. A spokesman didn’t immediately respond to request for comment. 

• New Hampshire Sen. Jeanne Shaheen’s interns are unpaid, according to her Senate website. A representative for her office did not respond to request for comment. 

• New Jersey Sen. Cory Booker’s internship website makes no mention of compensation, but a spokesman confirmed the internships are unpaid. 

• New Jersey Sen. Bob Menendez’s interns are unpaid, according to his Senate website. A spokeswoman didn’t immediately respond to a request for comment.

• New York Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand’s interns are unpaid, according to her Senate website. A spokesman for her office confirmed this with Mic in an email.

• New York Sen. Chuck Schumer’s interns are unpaid, according to his Senate website. A spokesman didn’t respond to multiple requests for comment.

• Oregon Sen. Ron Wyden’s interns are unpaid, according to the Senate website. A spokesman confirmed this with Mic in an email. 

• Rhode Island Sen. Jack Reed’s interns are unpaid according to reports in the Atlantic and the Providence Journalthough his Senate website does not obviously list information about intern compensation. A spokesman for the senator didn’t respond to multiple requests for comment.

• Rhode Island Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse’s interns are unpaid according to a 2013 Atlantic article. A spokesman for the senator confirmed the Atlantic story is still accurate in an email.

• Virginia Sen. Mark Warner’s interns are unpaid, according to the Atlantic and a recent job listing. His office didn’t immediately respond to request for comment. 

• Washington Sen. Maria Cantwell’s interns are unpaid, according to her Senate website. Representatives for her office didn’t respond to a request for comment. 

• Washington Sen. Patty Murray’s internships are unpaid, according to her Senate website. A spokesman didn’t immediately respond to request for comment. 

• West Virginia Sen. Joe Manchin’s interns are unpaid, according to his Senate site. A spokesman didn’t immediately respond to request for comment. 

• Wisconsin Sen. Tammy Baldwin’s internships are unpaid, according to the application listed on her Senate website. A spokesperson didn’t immediately respond to request for comment. 

Republicans  

• Alabama Sen. Richard Shelby’s interns are unpaid, according to his Senate website, which cites budget restrictions. A spokeswoman didn’t immediately respond to request for comment.

• Arkansas Sen. John Boozman’s interns are unpaid, according to his Senate website. A spokesman didn’t immediately respond to request for comment.

• Florida Sen. Marco Rubio’s Senate website lists no compensation for interns, but the Atlantic report and job listings indicate the roles are unpaid. A representative did not respond to request for comment. 

• Georgia Sen. David Perdue’s interns are unpaid, a member of his press office confirmed in a phone call to Mic

• Georgia Sen. Johnny Isakson’s interns are unpaid, according to the online application and the Atlantic report. A spokesperson didn’t respond to multiple requests for comment. 

• Iowa Sen. Joni Ernst’s Senate website and application materials make no mention of compensation, neither does a recent press release calling for applications. The media contact listed on the press release didn’t respond to multiple requests for comment. 

• Iowa Sen. Chuck Grassley’s interns are unpaid, a spokeswoman confirmed to Mic in an email.

• Louisiana Sen. Bill Cassidy’s interns are unpaid, according to his campaign website. A spokesperson didn’t immediately respond to request for comment. 

• Missouri Sen. Roy Blunt’s interns are unpaid, according to his Senate website. A spokesperson didn’t immediately respond to request for comment. 

• Montana Sen. Steve Daines’ internship page does not list any compensation, but a listing for the internship describes it as “volunteer” position. A representative for his office didn’t respond to multiple requests for comment. 

• Nevada Sen. Dean Heller’s interns are unpaid, according to his Senate website. A representative didn’t respond to multiple request for comment.  

• North Carolina Sen. Thom Tillis’ Senate website doesn’t indicate whether interns are paid or not, but job listings online say they are unpaid. A press representative didn’t respond to multiple requests for comment. 

• Ohio Sen. Rob Portman’s interns are unpaid, a spokesman for his office confirmed over the phone.  

• Oklahoma Sen. James Lankford’s are unpaid according to his website. A spokesman confirmed this in an email to Mic

• Pennsylvania Sen. Pat Toomey’s interns are unpaid, according to her Senate website. A spokesperson didn’t immediately respond to request for comment. 

• South Carolina Sen. Lindsey Graham’s interns are unpaid, according to his Senate website. A spokeswoman didn’t immediately respond to request for comment. 

• Tennessee Sen. Lamar Alexander’s interns are unpaid, according to his Senate website. A spokesperson confirmed this to Mic in an email.

• Tennessee Sen. Bob Corker’s internship website doesn’t list any information about compensation, but job listings and news reports say the internships are unpaid. A representative for his office didn't respond to multiple requests for comment. 

• Texas Sen. John Cornyn’s Senate website lists no compensation for interns, but job listings indicate the work is unpaid. The Atlantic also reported his interns are unpaid, but his office did not respond to multiple requests by Mic for comment. 

• Texas Sen. Ted Cruz’s interns are unpaid, according to his Senate website. A spokesperson didn’t respond to Mic’s request for comment. 

• West Virginia Sen. Shelley Moore Capito’s Senate website lists no information about compensation, but job listings indicate the internships are unpaid. A spokesperson didn’t respond to multiple requests for comment. 

• Wisconsin Sen. Ron Johnson’s Senate website says that interns can receive college credit, but the Atlantic and job listings indicate the role is unpaid. A representative didn’t immediately respond to request for comment. 

A final note: In several cases, a senator’s website listed internships as unpaid, but after following up with their office, Mic learned that they do make funds available to certain interns through scholarships, travel assistance, or outside foundations. Also, many senators’ offices, whether they pay or not, help interns get college credit for their time spent working. If that means you can graduate sooner, or pay for one fewer class in a given semester, you’re technically not working for nothing. But giving interns college credits — without a stipend for living costs — still ignores what’s at the heart of Pay Our Interns’ point. As Vera put it himself, even the best learning experiences can’t pay the bills.

Read our full article which goes into more analysis (3/10/17 2:02 PM)

Republican Sens. Susan Collins and Lisa Murkowski said Wednesday they will vote against Education Department nominee Betsy DeVos, leaving her with no votes to spare to survive a looming confirmation vote.

No Democrats are expected to vote for DeVos, while a handful of other Republican senators remain undecided. She needs at least 50 votes to win confirmation and there are just 52 GOP senators. Still, senior leadership aides remain confident that DeVos will prevail.

“This is not a decision I make lightly. I have a great deal of respect for Mrs. DeVos,” Collins said on the floor on Wednesday. “I will not, can not vote to confirm her.”

In an interview, Collins said that she will allow DeVos to advance to a final vote, before opposing her. Likewise, Murkowski said she will oppose Collins on final passage, a shocking rebellion against President Donald Trump that rippled through the Capitol.

“I have heard from thousands, truly, thousands of Alaskans who have shared their concerns about Mrs. DeVos,“ Murkowski said. “I do not intend to vote on final passage to support Mrs. DeVos.”

DeVos, a GOP megadonor and education advocate who has long pushed for charter schools and K-12 tuition vouchers using public funds, has encountered criticism from both parties since Trump nominated her.

http://www.politico.com/story/2017/02/susan-collins-betsy-devos-confirmation-234497

2

Moderate Republicans say they won’t cut health insurance. But all the GOP proposals do just that.

  • Since the Senate health care bill was unveiled last week, moderate Republicans skeptical of the proposal have shared “very serious concerns” about the proposed deep cuts to Medicaid.
  • Sen. Susan Collins (R-Maine) summed it up Thursday, “I can’t support a bill that is going to result in tens of millions of people losing their health insurance.”
  • Every Republican health care proposal thus far has been estimated to cause millions of people to lose insurance. The bill passed by the House would cut coverage for more than 20 million people. The Senate bill would make even deeper cuts to Medicaid.
  • Unless major changes to the Senate bill preserve existing insurance coverage, any successful version of this proposal will still lead to millions of people losing insurance — and these moderate senators going back on their word. Those losses will be particularly acute for people on Medicaid. Read more (6/26/17)

Kellyanne Conway says GOP health care plan doesn’t cut Medicaid, “able-bodied” need only find work

  • Appearing on ABC’s This Week on Sunday, Kellyanne Conway assured anchor George Stephanopoulos that the projected $800 billion the Affordable Care Act repeal could divert from the federal aid program is not what it seems.
  • “These are not cuts to Medicaid, George,” Conway said. “This slows the rate for the future and it allows governors more flexibility with Medicaid dollars because they’re closest to the people in need.”
  • Those people, Conway said, were “the poor, the sick, the needy, the disabled, children, some elderly, women — particularly pregnant women.”
  • All versions of the Republican-backed health care plan, colloquially dubbed Trumpcare, have been projected to funnel federal dollars away from each of the groups Conway named. 
  • The Senate’s new bill looks to be particularly harsh because its Medicaid restrictions work over time, making less money available for elder and disability care in coming years. Read more (6/25/17)
buzzfeed.com
SMALL VICTORY: Senate Republicans Can't Get Enough Backing For Their Health Bill So They Delayed The Vote
Six senators have said publicly that they cannot support the health care bill as written.
By Paul McLeod

Paul McLeod at BuzzFeed News:

Senate Republican leaders, lacking enough support to pass their Obamacare repeal and replace bill draft, have delayed their vote on the measure until after they return for a weeklong July 4 recess.

The move came after six Republican senators said publicly that they could not support the health care draft bill as written and several more remained on the fence. GOP leadership was pushing hard for a vote this week, arguing that it would only get harder to pass the bill the longer members wait.

But on Tuesday afternoon, Senate Majority Whip John Cornyn, the Republicans’ vote-counter, told reporters: “We need more time… It’s a conversation and we haven’t finished our conversation.”

Some Republicans, including Sens. Susan Collins of Maine and Dean Heller of Nevada have cited concerns about the bill’s cuts to Medicaid and its rollback of the Obamacare Medicaid expansion. Others, like Sens. Rand Paul of Kentucky, Ted Cruz of Texas, Mike Lee of Utah, and Ron Johnson of Wisconsin, have said that the bill doesn’t go far enough in repealing Obamacare’s regulations and subsidies.

This is a small victory for the American people: I am glad that the Trumpcare vote in the Senate has been delayed, but we still gotta fight to make sure this disastrous bill doesn’t pass.

SAVE LIVES TODAY! CALL SOME SENATORS!

ESPECIALLY IF YOU LIVE IN MAINE, ALASKA, OHIO, WEST VIRGINIA, WISCONSIN, OR KENTUCKY!!!! Even if you’re not, I have it on good authority that this is an ethical time to lie. 

Sen Lisa Murkowski, R, Alaska: 202-224-6665                                 

Sen Rob Portman, R, Ohio: 202-224-3353                 

Sen Shelly Moore Capito, R, West Virginia: 202-224-6472                 

Sen Susan Collins, R, Maine: (202)224-2523                        

Sen Ron Johnson, R, Wisconsin:  (202) 224-5323

Sen Rand Paul, R, Kentucky: 202-224-4343


Script: 

“Hi, my name is ____________________. I am from _______(somewhere in the state in question)____________ and I do not want the senator to vote to repeal Obamacare and pass Trumpcare.” 

Then you have options. 

1) You can stop there. 

2) Tell a personal story. “I [or my ___________________] have insurance under the affordable care act because __________________. My [their] coverage would be affected by this bill and I’m afraid of what that will mean for my [their] health.” 

3) Name big and important places where coverage will be cut. “I am concerned because this bill will: 

- disproportionately affect rural areas [where I am from.]” 

- cut all funding that is currently aiding in alleviating the opioid epidemic.” 

- cover 23 million less people.” 

- cut the number of health care professionals able to accept medicaid.” 

If you do any of the above, finish the call by saying, “Please do not vote to pass this new bill. Thank you.” 

A (short) list of Republicans in Congress who have criticized Trump’s immigration order

1. Rep. Charlie Dent (R-PA)

2. Sen. Jeff Flake (R-AZ)

3. Sen. Ben Sasse (R-NE)

4. Rep. Justin Amash (R-MI)

5. Sen. Susan Collins (R-ME)

6. Sen. Rob Portman (R-OH)

Those are isolated cases (at least so far). The GOP leadership in Congress has largely lined up behind Trump on this — or at least stayed very quiet. No one who’s been paying attention should be surprised by this — “the party has largely fallen in line behind their president ever since the election.

The Senate Republican healthcare bill is collapsing

(Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell with President Donald Trump.Evan Vucci/AP Images)

The Senate Republican healthcare bill teetered on the brink of collapse on Tuesday morning, just a few days after it was unveiled and the morning after the Congressional Budget Office delivered a brutal assessment of its potential effects on coverage.

Sen. Susan Collins of Maine, a key moderate vote in the Republican conference, tweeted on Monday night that given its potential effects, she would not vote for the legislation — or even a motion to move it forward on the Senate floor.

“I want to work w/ my GOP & Dem colleagues to fix the flaws in ACA. CBO analysis shows Senate bill won’t do it,” Collins tweeted Monday, adding that she would “vote no” on a motion to proceed.

Other members of the GOP Senate conference also appear to be on the fence about voting for the legislation, officially named the Better Care Reconciliation Act. Many of them wavered after an analysis from the nonpartisan CBO released Monday predicted that the BCRA would reduce the number of insured Americans by 22 million in 2026 compared with the current baseline.

Sen. Ron Johnson, of Wisconsin, one of four conservatives who came out against the legislation when it was released last week, also said on Monday that he had “a hard time believing I’ll have enough information for me to support a motion to proceed this week.”

A representative for Sen. Mike Lee, another conservative holdout, told The New York Times on Monday that the senator would not vote for the legislation as written.

Collins and Johnson joined Sens. Dean Heller and Rand Paul, who previously announced their opposition to a motion-to-proceed vote for the bill. Any more than two votes by GOP members against the motion would defeat it, as Senate Democrats universally oppose it.

Heller is up for reelection in 2018 in Nevada, a state that Hillary Clinton won and that has a popular GOP governor who opposes the BCRA for its cuts to Medicaid. Heller on Friday announced his intention to vote against the legislation.

In Paul, GOP leaders have the opposite problem, as the Kentucky senator believes the BCRA does not go far enough in its repeal of the Affordable Care Act, the healthcare law better known as Obamacare.

On Monday, moderate Sen. Lisa Murkowski of Alaska said she had not gotten to a “yes” vote yet and wanted to learn more about the bill’s potential effects on her state.

“I don’t have enough data in terms of the impact to my state to be able to vote in the affirmative,” Murkowski told CNN’s Dana Bash.

Sen. Bill Cassidy of Louisiana also wavered after seeing the CBO score.

“It makes me more concerned,” Cassidy told CNN. “I’ve been uncommitted and I remain uncommitted — I mean just deadline uncommitted. But it certainly makes me more concerned and makes me want to explore this more.”

(Republican Sen. Susan Collins of Maine.Associated Press/Evan Vucci)

Republican leadership targeted a vote late Tuesday or early Wednesday on the motion to proceed to get a final vote by the end of the week. This plan would finish the process before the weeklong July 4 congressional recess.

Senate GOP leadership had not given up hope as of Monday night, seeking to alleviate members’ concerns and at the very least clear the motion to proceed.

“We’re trying to accommodate their concerns without losing other support,” Senate Majority Whip John Cornyn told reporters, adding the conference was in a “good place.”

The White House is also attempting to exert its influence on the process, with Vice President Mike Pence dining with conservative members of the caucus including Lee, who signed a letter opposing the bill on Thursday.

President Donald Trump called Cruz, Johnson, Paul, and Sen. Shelley Moore Capito of West Virginia to ask for their support on the bill, according to the White House press secretary, Sean Spicer.

But Trump himself has wavered over the past several weeks. In an interview that aired Sunday, he appeared to confirm to Fox News that he called the House’s version of the healthcare bill “mean.” His comments have been a constant point of attack for Democrats over the past week.

The mix of members opposing the motion leaves leadership in a precarious position. If Senate leaders try to move the bill to the right by cutting more funding or repealing regulations to appease conservatives like Lee, Paul, and Johnson, they could further alienate Collins and Heller, as well as Murkowski and Capito.

Move the bill to center with more generous funding, a smaller deficit reduction, and a slower phasing out of Obamacare’s Medicaid expansion, and Lee, Johnson, Paul, and Cruz could block the vote.

But as many longtime political observers suggested Monday, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell would be as capable as anyone of brokering a deal that would placate both wings of the party.

Still, a deal is “unlikely before the end of this week, when the July 4 break begins — it’s not even certain a motion to proceed can pass today or tomorrow,” said Greg Valliere, the chief strategist at Horizon Investments. “But McConnell now has an option — he can yank the bill this week, delaying a final vote until late July, giving him time for wheeling and dealing with individual members.”

NOW WATCH: Ivanka Trump’s Instagram put her at the center of a controversy over her lavish art collection



More From Business Insider
A key GOP senator gave an ominous warning for the future of the Senate Republican healthcare bill

(Sen. Susan CollinsChip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
Senate GOP leaders decided to delay a vote on the party's healthcare bill on Tuesday until after the week-long July 4 recess. But the immediate reaction from one key senator made any change in fortune seem less than likely.

Sen. Susan Collins, a moderate from Maine, told reporters that it would take more than just a few “tweaks” to get her on board with the bill.

“I will say I have so many fundamental problems with the bill, that have been confirmed by the CBO report, that it’s difficult for me to see how any tinkering is going to satisfy my fundamental and deep concerns about the impact of the bill,” Collins said.

The Congressional Budget Office projected that 22 million more Americans would be without health insurance under the bill, Better Care Reconciliation Act, than the current baseline. Additionally, low-income and older Americans would end up paying more for insurance, the CBO projected.

For Senate Republican leaders, the worrying aspect of the Collins statement is that she wants structural changes to bill, which would be more likely to move it in a more moderate direction. But Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell moves the bill in that direction, he risks losing conservative members of his conference.

On the other hand, if leaders try to court conservatives, they could lose other moderates. Sen. Dean Heller of Nevada, for instance, has already said he would oppose the bill in its current form.

McConnell can only lose two votes for the bill to pass.

The CBO score did contain one piece of good news for the leadership. The report projected that the bill would reduce the deficit by $331 billion over 10 years, over $200 billion more in savings than the House version. Since the Senate bill only has to save the same amount of the House bill for it to qualify under Senate rules, McConnell could use that difference to include incentives for individual senators.

In addition to reiterating her opposition to the bill, Collins also criticized President Donald Trump’s approach to the healthcare debate.

“This president is the first president in our history who has had neither political nor military experience,” Collins said. “Thus, it has been a challenge to him to learn how to interact with Congress and how to push his agenda forward. I also believe it would have been better had the president started with infrastructure, which has bipartisan support, rather than tackling a political divisive and technically complicated issue like healthcare.”

Collins said she would go to the White House along with the rest on the Senate GOP conference for a meeting with Trump on healthcare at 4 p.m. ET on Tuesday.

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