On fourth-and-5 in Oregon territory late in third quarter, Jameis Winston was flushed from the pocket and as he loaded to throw his foot slipped and the ball popped out of his hands.  Tony Washington recovered the fumble and went 58 yards for a touchdown, which put Oregon up 45-20. The Ducks won the Rose Bowl in a 59-20 rout of the Seminoles. (John W. McDonough/SI)

GALLERY: SI’s Best Shots from the Rose Bowl

Signal boost! Help if you can!

My boyfriend was diagnosed with (and treated for) Hodgkin’s Lymphoma, a type of blood cancer, in 2012. Though he has been in remission for almost two years now, the fight against cancer is never over, which is why he’s a Team Captain for this year’s Light The Night FSU Walk on November 13th.

The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society was a huge help to him when he was diagnosed, and he is deeply honored to support them this year as a survivor. He made a team through Foundation Beyond Belief, a secular charity that you can learn more about at here.

If anybody is interested in donating to the team (or walking with us, if possible!), the link to his personal page is http://pages.lightthenight.org/ncfl/Tallahas14/JKarpf and the team page is http://pages.lightthenight.org/…/Tal…/FoundationBeyondBelief.

If you could donate even two dollars we would really appreciate it. If you’re unable to donate but would like to help out, simply like and reblog this post to help spread the word.

Thank you!

When I was a kid my father used to say “Our greatest hopes and our worst fears are seldom realized.” Our worst fears have been realized tonight.
— 

Jim McKay, while covering the Munich massacre at the 1972 Summer Olympics for ABC.


I was naive to think that this could have never happened at FSU and now my heart and prayers go to those injured and affected, having been an RA during my undergraduate years, we are certainly trained to deal with this type of event, but immediately forget how to (I speak mainly for myself) as well, you’d never actually expect it to happen.

Coming back for medical school here has been nothing short of an amazing experience. I love my alma mater and to be back to continue a life-long goal is electrifying every day.

Am I scared? No. I’ll walk across the street to the College of Medicine and attend the lecture that’s expected of me, because it’s what FSU expects of me, and I’ll be damned if I don’t meet the expectations of this great institution.

Our Greatest Hopes are that we can shake off our fears, and uphold the Garnet & Gold by displaying  Vires, Artes, Mores — Strength, Skill and Character.

Go Seminoles.

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Im using these photos as examples of a depiction of the history of my mom’s side of the family. (NOTE: I’m not related to any of the people shown on here, If you’re curious!) The Seminole Freedmen are basically the descendants of Black run away slaves from Georgia and South Carolina (the Geechee and Gullah peoples) AND the Seminole Natives from Florida. The run away slaves fleed to Florida in hope of finding freedom away from slavery. The two groups had children together thus, combining the two ethnicities and creating what we know as Afro-Seminoles, Black Seminoles, and Seminole Freedmen. Once the Trail of Tears occurred, Native families from all over the country were FORCED to migrate west, eventually ending in Oklahoma (what some called “Indian Territory” at the time). The tribal members in Oklahoma are under the Seminole Nation of Oklahoma. Some people somehow stayed in Florida and crated the Seminole Nation of Oklahoma. Most people often confuse the two as being the same thing. Most of my mom’s side is from Oklahoma (Seminole, Wewoka, and OKC). Other members either lived in Texas or in Missouri. Two of my uncles and my mom moved from Oklahoma during the late 70s and went to high school in Northern Virginia (Groveton High in Alexandria). She met and eventually married my dad in the mid 90s here in Maryland. I was born in nearby, Washington, D.C. and was raised in nearby, Prince George’s County, Maryland. As a kid would take yearly flights with Mom to Oklahoma for summer break but I haven’t been there in 7 years or so. Personally, I felt bad because I wanted to embrace my other ethnicity and that people wouldn’t take me seriously for telling them that I am part Native. They automatically thought stereotype of about the light skinned, long and black haired Native Americans and I didn’t “fit the description”. From day one Mom taught me that I was a Seminole Freedman, always keep your Native ID on you at all times, and how our bloodlines flowed maternally. I learned about important, historical figures like John Horse but I’m still trying to learn the Miskogee and Creek languages. I had to learn about the Dawes Rolls and ot what that meant to all Black Seminoles. I even took up the Creator’s Game, also known as Lacrosse and fell in love with it. Things even got emotional when I had to learn the hard way that my favorite team (Washington NFL) that I rooted for all of my life had a name that was a slur against one of my ethnicities. I support the PLAYERS but NOT that arrogant owner of ours and the name. The fact that I’m from the DC area and people STILL don’t understand WHY the name, mascot, and imagery SHOULD go or the EFFECTS of being labeled as a mascot does to Natives, especially Native children is very sad and disturbing!! I never attended tribal events before such as pow wows. I always wanted to meet and befriend other native peoples but where I’m from there aren’t any. Its not like I could convinently travel halfway across the country from the DMV area to the OKC area you know. For once, it would be cool to just meet other LEGIT Natives, not the ones who CLAIM that they are but can’t back their claims up ACTUAL paperwork. I love my melanin and Black culture but it would be wrong not to acknowledge my other ethnicity. Is that too much to ask for?