semi automatic rifle

Let’s get one thing fucking straight

The Las Vegas shooter was not mentally ill


He planned this out

Picked the weapon

Picked the event

Picked the hotel

Picked the room

He knew damn well what he was doing

He is sane

And he is a fucking monster

Stop trying to humanize him

Stop dragging those that actually suffer with mental illness under the bus

Stop acting like we’re the problem with gun violence

Stop IGNORING how this monster LEGALLY got his hands on 17 semi automatic rifles –modified them to make them automatic– then got enough ammo to kill 59 people and injure over 510 more

Stop letting people say that this isn’t about gun control

Stop tolerating the bullshit because it’s the easier thing to do

Start speaking the fuck up because you don’t know when you’ll end up watching people die around you just because you went out to have some fun

‘Sawn-off’ PTRS-41 antitank rifle

Designed by Sergei Gavrilovich Simonov c.1941 and manufactured until the development of the RPG series of personal antitank weapons. The SKS is here for scale.
14,5x114mm 5-round internal magazine, reloaded from the bottom with an en-bloc clip, gas operated semi-automatic.

The funny thing about the picture is that the SKS’sdesign is a scaled down PTRS. Behold, the smart way and the awesome way to do one thing.

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Australian mass shooter Martin Bryant being interviewed following the Port Arthur massacre

On April 28th 1996 Martin Bryant opened fire at the Port Arthur historic site, a popular tourist destination in Tasmania, Australia. He was armed with a .223 calibre Colt AR-15 SP1 Carbine and a .308 calibre L1A1 SLR battle rifle. Bryant murdered 35 people and injured a further 23 others making it Australia’s deadliest mass shooting to this day.

The massacre caused a national outcry and Prime Minister John Howard introduced new gun control legislation. The National Firearms Programme Implementation Act of 1996 was passed the same year restricting private ownership of high capacity semi-automatic rifles and shotguns as well as pump-action shotguns. Uniform firearms licensing was also introduced. These measures passed with bipartisan support from the entire Commonwealth and Australian states and territories.

The people killed by Martin Bryant were Winifred Aplin (58), Walter Bennett (66), Nicole Burgess (17), Sou Leng Chung (32), Elva Gaylard (48), Zoe Ann Hall (28), Elizabeth Howard (26), Mary Howard (57), Mervyn Howard (55), Ronald Noel Jary (71), Tony Kistan (51), Leslie Lever (53), Sarah Kate Loughton (15), David Martin (72), Noelene Joyce Martin (69), Pauline Masters (49), Alannah Louise Mikac (6), Madeline Grace Mikac (3), Nanette Patricia Mikac (36), Andrew Bruce Mills (39), Peter Brenton Nash (32), Gwenda Joan Neander (67), Moh Yee William Ng (48), Anthony Nightingale (44), Mary Rouse Nixon (60), Glenn Pears (35), Russell James Pollard (72), Janette Quin (50), Helene Salzmann (50), Robert Salzmann (57), Kate Elizabeth Scott (21), Kevin Sharp (68), Raymond Sharp (67), Royce William Thompson (59) and Jason Bernard Winter (29).

Although his true motive remains largely unknown, it is claimed by his lawyer that Bryant was fuelled by a desire for notoriety and infamy having been inspired by international media reports of the Dunblane school massacre in Scotland, United Kingdom. Following his capture Bryant was fixated on finding out how many people he killed and was reportedly impressed and pleased with the number.

A monument and memorial garden were constructed in Port Arthur to be opened on the fourth anniversary of the massacre in April, 2000. Bryant remains in prison today age 50 in the Wilfred Lopes Centre near the Risdon Prison Complex.

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RSC Fusil Semi-Automatique Mle1917

Designed by Ribeyrolles, Sutter, and Chauchat - made by the Manufacture d’Armes de Tulle in France c.1917~18.
8x51mmR Lebel five-round en-bloc clip, gas-operated semi-automatic, loaded from the bottom.

Made with several Lebel parts, the RSC Mle1917 was the first semi-automatic military rifle to be mass-issued and used during a major conflict, namely World War one. It was a far cry from the revolutionary designs of the French rifle trials of the early 20th century, but it was decently reliable and provided a lot more firepower than the old Lebel Mle1886.

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The FN P90

Introduced by the Belgian company FN Herstal in 1991, the P90 was developed in the late 1980′s as a response to a NATO request for a new caliber to replace the 9mm Para. As a result, the FN P90 would create a new class of military firearm, the Personal Defense Weapon (PDW).  As far back as the 18th century, there was a need for light, compact weapons designed specifically for rear echelon units, units which were not expected to enter into front line combat, but still at risk of being ambushed and being thrust into combat. Such personnel included artilleryman, vehicle drivers, communications personnel, signalers, messengers, and other support troops. These troops needed weapons which were light and compact so that they didn’t hinder the soldier’s main task, but effective enough that the soldier could defend himself.  In the 18th and 19th century rear echelon soldiers typically carried musketoons and carbines, which were often shortened versions of the standard issue infantry musket.  During World War I pistols, pistol carbines and short rifles were common. During World War II submachine guns became popular as well as short rifles and carbines. 

The FN P90 was introduced for this purpose, but differed greatly from all other carbines, short rifles, and submachine guns that came before it. As a PDW, the P90 used a new kind of small caliber high velocity cartridge.  The intermediate cartridge used in modern assault rifles was designed to be a compromise between a submachine gun and high powered bolt action or semi automatic rifles. It was developed to be smaller in caliber and shorter than say a .30-06, .303 British, 8mm Mauser, or 7.62x54R, and thus having less range and power, but more powerful and with greater range than pistol or submachine gun cartridges such as th 9x19mm Para or .45ACP. The concept behind the intermediate cartridge was to replicate the firepower of the submachine gun, but still maintain accuracy and range sufficient for battlefield use. The P90 uses a cartridge shorter than the intermediate cartridge, but longer than a pistol cartridge. The new cartridge introduced was the FN 5.7x28mm.

Essentially the 5.7x28mm cartridge was a further compromise between the submachine gun and the assault rifle. While shorter than an intermediate cartridge, it produces more range and accuracy than a submachine gun. What is also special about the 5.7x28 is it’s small caliber 20-40 grain bullet, which despite being small, packs an incredible punch with a muzzle velocity between 2,200 - 2,800 feet per second depending of grainage. Compare this to the 5.56x45mm cartridge used in assault rifles which has a muzzle velocity of around 3,000+ feet per second, and the 9mm Para, a common pistol cartridge, which has a muzzle velocity of around 1,000 -1,300 feet per second.  As a result the 5.7x28mm is rated as being able to puncture level IIIA kevlar armor at a range of 300m. The 5.7x28mm cartridge is also known for being very accurate, with a very flat trajectory. Finally, since it is a very small cartridge, soldiers can carry more ammunition. When paired with the P90 the cartridge allows for 50 round standard capacity magazines, whereas most assault rifles have 30 round capacity mags.

The magazines are also unique in that they are top mounted horizontally. The P90 has a blistering firing rate of 900 rounds per minute, which is aided by the cartridge’s light recoil, allowing for very controlled fully automatic fire. Recoil is also managed with a muzzle brake which also functions as a flash suppressor. The P-90 can also be fired in semi automatic with the flick of a selector switch.  Spent casings are ejected downward through a chute in the grip.

Aiding its purpose as a light rear echelon weapon, the P-90′s bullpup design makes it a very compact weapon, being only 20 inches in length and weighing 5.7lbs. The P90 was also designed the be completely ambidextrous; equally suitable for both right and left handed users. Another unique standard feature of the P90 is a reflex sigh, with regualr v-notch iron sights for backup. Optimum range is around 200 meters.

Despite its unique features the P90 hasn’t been heavily popular, with only around 17,000 being produced. In fact, the PDW concept has been slow to get off the ground. Nor has the 5.7x28mm replaced the 9mm Para, despite FN having also introduced a pistol chambered for it called the FN Five-seven. However, the P90 has been adopted for use by special forces of 40 nations. Some law enforcement agencies have also adopted the P90, most notably the US Secret Service because it is a weapon that packs a lot of firepower, but is compact enough to hide under a coat. The P90 saw some use among special forces deployed during the Persian Gulf War, and some have made their way into the hands of Libyan and Syrian rebels. However, the P90 lacks a serious battlefield history.

While the P90 has not yet fulfilled it’s role as a rear echelon weapon, there is one role that I must point out that the P90 has fulfilled beautifully. A role that I’m sure is on the back of the minds of many people readings this and probably the only reason the P90 is recognizable in pop culture. Due to the P90′s futuristic design, it made a perfect weapon for use in Science Fiction films and TV shows. Probably the most notable was was in the SciFi TV series Stargate SG-1 and it’s spin off series Stargate Atlantis, the P90 becoming the weapon of choice of Stargate command and being featured  in most episodes. As a science fition geek, I would consider Stargate SG1′s use of the P90 to be almost as iconic as the phaser in Star Trek and blaster in Star Wars. Indeed Startgate SG1 probably made a better advertisement for FN Herstal’s PDW than any battlefield performance reports.

Fire and retreat from Replicators

This is a weapon of terror, it’s made to intimidate the enemy. This is a weapon of war, it’s made to kill the enemy.”

Kinder chocolate eggs are illegal in the US cuz they’re “too dangerous” and MIGHT kill children.

Meanwhile, semi-automatic rifles (which were used to literally kill an entire classroom of SIX YEAR OLD children) are perfectly legal in the US.

So maybe, after yet another brutal massacre in Vegas, those asshole senators tweeting “their thoughts and prayers” can stop taking money from the NRA and start making laws that will prevent the unnecessary murder of teenagers, college students, movie goers, concert goers and children.

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Before Adam Lanza, who perpetrated the “Sandy Hook Massacre,” there was Patrick Purdy and the “Stockton Massacre.” Patrick was born in Tacoma, Washington in 1964. When just 2-years-old, Patrick’s mother divorced his father after he threatened her with a gun. As a student in Cleveland Elementary School, he soon turned to alcohol in an attempt to alleviate his problems. After slapping his mother in the face, he was thrown out of her home and was homeless for several months before being placed in foster care. Patrick was eventually adopted by a family and shortly thereafter, started to take hard drugs as a coping mechanism.

When Patrick was 17-years-old, his father died in a traffic collision and Patrick soon started to accuse his mother of stealing money that was left behind for him. Throughout his adolescence, he was in and out of trouble with the law. He was a known drug addict and as a way to finance his drug addiction, he turned to prostitution. He was arrested on several occasions, from drug dealing to robbery, he was seemingly constantly serving a sentence for something. On one stint, he attempted suicide and was diagnosed as having “‘mental retardation.” After his release in 1987, he started to collect books on white supremacy and could often be heard complaining about the high volume of Asians in the area he lived as well as San Joaquin Delta College where he attended welding classes. Friends would later describe Patrick as suicidal, adding that he seemed to have a particular hatred for those of Asian descent, adding that he never came across as violent. His apartment in Stockton, California, was filled with toy soldiers - he was peculiar, they said, but nothing hinted he was dangerous. He often complained he was upset that he never made anything of himself and was a failure. On 17 January, 1989, an anonymous caller contacted Stockton Police Department and warned them that the young pupils of Cleveland Elementary School, Patrick’s old school, would be dead. Nevertheless, classes carried on as usual but that day would be anything other than “usual.”

At approximately noon, Patrick parked his car behind the school. His car was packed with fireworks which he then set alight, causing his car to explode. From here he walked to the school playground, armed with a semi-automatic rifle, he shot indiscriminately. Within three minutes, he shot 106 rounds, killing five children and wounding another 30. All of the children who were killed and a vast majority of the injured were of Cambodian or Vietnamese descent. The parents of these children had immigrated to America in search of pastures green. After the shooting, Patrick shot himself dead.

The shocking murders begged the question: “How could a man with a history such as Patricks, walk into a gun store and leave with an AK-47, no questions asked?” The sole purpose of weapons such as this is to end human life, so why was he so easily able to purchase one? Following the murders, measures were taken to ban assault weapons in California, paving the way to the Roberti-Roos Assault Weapons Control Act or 1989.

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M1 carbine with M3 infrared scope

Manufactured by Inland Manufacturing Division of General Motors, scope by American Optical Co. c.1944 - serial number 345402.
7.62×33mm/.30 Carbine 15-round removable box magazine, gas operated semi-automatic, 20k Volt infrared light with 175m range infrared scope, additional foregrip.

Developed at the end of WW2, but also used in the subsequent conflicts involving America, the M3 scope resulted in one of the very first nigh-vision firearm with the German StG44 Vampir system.
As far as I understand it wasn’t mounted on the M1 Garand because of its limited range being better suited to its carbine counterpart.

FN-49

Belgian semi-automatic rifle that was produced in several different calibers for various nations that adopted it for military use. The particular example in the photo is desirable Argentinian model that is chambered in 7.62x51mm. It differed from it’s counterparts by using a detatchable 20-round proprietary magazine. Though an excellent design, the FN-49 arrived far too late to the world stage and was overshadowed by the FAL, (GRH)

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Turnbull TAR-10 rifle

Custom made from an Armalite AR-10 rifle by Turnbull Restoration & Manufacturing Co. c.2010′s.
.223 Remington 10-round removable box magazine, semi automatic, chrome-lined barrel with muzzle brake, faux-wood furniture, frame case-hardened with bone charcoal for some reason.

This works for me, give this treatment to more black rifles.