sem images

Produced by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), under a magnification of 25,000X, this digitally-colorized scanning electron microscopic (SEM) image depicts numerous filamentous Ebola virus particles (blue) budding from a chronically-infected VERO E6 cell (yellow-green).

Ebola is one of numerous Viral Hemorrhagic Fevers. It is a severe, often fatal disease in humans and nonhuman primates (such as monkeys, gorillas, and chimpanzees).

Ebola is caused by infection with a virus of the family Filoviridae, genus Ebolavirus. When infection occurs, symptoms usually begin abruptly. The first Ebolavirus species was discovered in 1976 in what is now the Democratic Republic of the Congo near the Ebola River. Since then, outbreaks have appeared sporadically. See the Flickr link for additional SEM NIAID Ebola virus imagery.

Produced by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), this digitally-colorized scanning electron microscopic (SEM) image of a dry-fractured Vero cell revealed its contents, and the ultrastructural details at the site of an opened vacuole, inside of which you can see numerous Coxiella burnetii bacteria undergoing rapid replication. Please see the Flickr link below for additional NIAID photomicrographs of various microbes.

Infection of humans by Coxiella burnetii bacteria usually occurs by inhalation of these organisms from air that contains airborne barnyard dust contaminated by dried placental material, birth fluids, and excreta of infected animals. Other modes of transmission to humans, including tick bites, ingestion of unpasteurized milk or dairy products, and human to human transmission, are rare. Humans are often very susceptible to the disease, and very few organisms may be required to cause infection.

Copyright Restrictions: None - This image is in the public domain and thus free of any copyright restrictions. As a matter of courtesy we request that the content provider be credited and notified in any public or private usage of this image.

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Placoid scales aka dermal denticles are found in cartilaginous fishes such as sharks, rays, and chimaeras. 

They are also structurally homologous with vertebrate teeth (“denticle” translates to “small tooth”), having a central pulp cavity supplied with blood vessels, surrounded by a conical layer of dentine, all of which sits on top of a rectangular basal plate that rests on the dermis. 

The shape of denticles is specific to individual species and cannot grow in size, but rather more scales are added as the fish increases in size. 

  • SEM image of Banded Wobbegong Shark (Orectolobus ornatus), Brier Shark (Deania calcea), Tiger Shark (Galeocerdo cuvier) and Gummy Shark (Mustelus antarctius) denticles.
  • all photographs by Sue Lindsay/ Australian Museum 
Como fazer themes + THEME BASE COM E SEM APPEARENCE

TUTORIAL by britinpsds

Muitas pessoas tem dúvidas em questão de tags e como modificar um theme, e as vezes até muita vontade de aprender a fazer themes ou até mesmo editá-los. Porém com pequenos tutoriais espalhados pelos tumblrs, surgem as dificuldades. Não é difícil fazer um theme, é preciso gostar, querer aprender, e prestar bastante atenção.

Para essas pessoas, eu vou ensiná-las a fazer um theme do zero, explicando as tags necessárias e os recursos usados.

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Art in Engineering Revealed

Many people think that applying science and math to real-world problems gives you engineering. That’s true, of course, and from the wide field of intellectual pursuit every year blooms seemingly physics-defying bridges, technologies that operate at the nanoscale, amazingly capable robots and vehicles that take us to space or the deepest depths of the ocean. But often lost in this utilitarian view of engineering is the fact that it can also give rise to a whole lot of art, too. 

The University of Cambridge’s engineering department saw the charm in its community’s work and put out a call for the most visually stunning images in a photography competition sponsored by optics maker Zeiss. Now the department has put them on display for us to ogle. 

“I love the way in which the essence of engineering can be captured in a single beautiful image – these intriguing works of art convey wonderful stories of determined engineers battling to crack real-world problems and finding the most elegant answers,” said department research director Philip Guildford, one of the competition’s judges. Read more below and see the video.

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