selmy barristan

Strange Shit That Has Happened On Game Grumps And Isn’t Even Discussed
  • Barristan Selmy from Game of Thrones opens a random episode for no apparent reason and with no explanation
  • Arin scream-sings Circle of Life in a public place
  • The fucking ads are the stuff of nightmares
  • Rob Schneider comes on Game Grumps after Arin completely rips apart his tv show for a full episode
  • Arin opened a set of 10 or so episodes with monologues about following his twitter, cooking your own food, that he’s really a bat portraying the character of Arin Hanson, that his editor is too handsome, he wants to sell out to Wendy’s, and then hits himself as hard as he can with a plastic bat. This is giffed but not commented on.
  • Chris Pratt likes the Super Mario Galaxy playthrough, confirms he is a melon with his name written on it.
  • Arin assembles what looks like a several hundred person mob to go to a random Wendy’s in Ohio, because he wants to sell out to them but they won’t return his tweets. 
  • They’ve got a fucking TV show coming out with the guys from Rick and Morty? Why is this not mentioned more?
  • L o v e l y  d a y  f o r  c r i c k e t 
  • Arin and Ross abused the ‘give a free ride get a free ride’ code on Uber by sending theirs out to 3.5 million people. Reportedly, Arin now has over 800 free rides.
  • Ross and Barry sold their pokemon fanart in an art gallery.
  • Seriously the fucking ads? In one of them Barry is turned upside down while Arin growls in a corner and then time-lapse punches Barry into a wall, and this is an advert for Lootcrate
  • Dan repeatedly hit a two pound gummy bear against a table to try and remove its head
  • A professor of theoretical physics quit his fucking job to do the show

ASOIAF MEME: Wenda the White Fawn and the Kingswood Brotherhood

The Kingswood Brotherhood was an infamous outlaw organization during the reign of King Aerys II. Operating out of the Kingswood, the Brotherhood gained recognition by kidnapping several nobles and evading early attempts to capture them. Ultimately, they became such a nuisance that King Aerys sent a detachment of soldiers led by notable members of the Kingsguard to destroy them. Lord Sumner Crakehall and his two squires, Jaime Lannister and Merrett Frey, were also part of the retinue, led by Ser Arthur Dayne.

The Brotherhood was sheltered by the smallfolk of the Kingswood, preventing the royal forces from finding and ending the outlaws. However, Ser Arthur Dayne gained the confidence of the smallfolk, who had believed that the only ones protecting their rights was the Brotherhood. Arthur petitioned the king for better rights for the smallfolk and he made sure the royal forces paid for any items they took from the peasantry. Arthur’s actions swung the allegiance of the smallfolk to the royal forces who could now hunt the Brotherhood, as the outlaws could no longer walk around with impunity in the forest.

In a notable clash, the young Jaime Lannister, Ser Arthur Dayne, and Ser Barristan Selmy faced off against several notable outlaws, including the Smiling Knight and their leader, Simon Toyne. Barristan killed Simon, while Arthur killed the Smiling Knight. Jaime regards the battle, in which he crossed swords with the Smiling Knight, as one of his fondest memories.

Other members of the Brotherhood included Wenda the White Fawn, Oswyn Longneck the Thrice Hanged, Big Belly Ben, Fletcher Dick and Ulmer. All members are presumed dead except Ulmer, who joined the Night’s Watch to avoid execution.

punkrocknerdfighter  asked:

you think barristan will die in meereen? warsandpoliticsoficeandfire laid out a pretty compelling theory of barristan switching to aegon's side

Thanks for the question, @punkrocknerdfighter.

I cannot speak to that author’s supposed argument. But I can discuss why I think it more likely that Barristan will die in Meereen, before Daenerys returns, than that he will betray her for Young Aegon.

Barristan’s POV arc in ADWD was undoubtedly short, but I believe it proved more than satisfactory in crystallizing the thematic elements of his story in a meaningful way while also setting up his downfall. In my opinion, Barristan’s story has largely concerned the question “What does it mean to serve a king?”, and that question comes to a head for him after Daenerys leaves, when he finds himself serving King Hizdahr. As the court changes under Hizdahr - Daenerys loyalists being dismissed or reduced in importance, replaced by Hizdahr’s men - Barristan grows more uncomfortable, and more willing to listen to Skahaz’s conspiracy to depose him. When Hizdahr refuses to retaliate against the unjust murder of the hostage Groleo - something Barristan thinks even weak Jaehaerys II would have done - Barristan’s move against Hizdahr is assured. The “Kingbreaker” thus becomes the climax, not just for Barristan in ADWD but Barristan as a Kingsguard: he finally does what he never had the courage to do with Aerys or Robert - depose an unworthy king in favor of a rightful queen, or at least ruling in a rightful queen’s name, breaking the blind oath of loyalty expected of a Kingsguard in the cause of justice.

However, Barristan made a critical error in ADWD, one that I think will prove his undoing: trusting the Shavepate. Barristan is not a fool, but he entered into agreement with an unscrupulously ambitious and very deceptive man. It’s the Shavepate who almost certainly poisoned the locusts at Daznak’s Pit, the Shavepate who spent ADWD angling against Hizdahr and his set, and the Shavepate who is now in control of the city proper (with Queen’s Hand Barristan bringing war outside). I have no doubt that the Shavepate is going to take advantage of Barristan’s absence in battle to further his political goals - goals Barristan will find horrifying.

So I do believe TWOW will serve as a great triumph and then an immediate, tragic denouement for the white knight. The released preview chapter “Barristan I” ends with a strong pre-battle speech, one clearly fed from his decades of martial experience - a speech that, for my money, has “heroic last words” written all over it. Hell, I’ll admit that the ending to “Barristan II” of TWOW (never released formally in text, but read aloud) even makes me shiver a little, I like it so; the whole chapter is a stage to show off Barristan’s prowess as a wartime commander, but especially the glee in his voice when he compares the landing of Victarion’s fleet to the hammer and the anvil of the Redgrass Field … well, it’s one of the more stirring moments in ASOIAF for me, even though it’s not even released yet.

How tragic then, for Barristan to return to his adopted city a hero, the savior of Meereen, the loyal and true knight - only to find that, in his absence, the Shavepate has had Hizdahr, Reznak, and the child hostages killed. The Shavepate’s hatred of Hizdahr was an open fact throughout ADWD, and time and again he has called for the the child hostages Daenerys took to be murdered, first in retaliation for the Sons of the Harpy murders and then the murders of the Meereenese hostages with the Yunkai'i (though Daenerys and Barristan refused to countenance the murder of children of whom both had become fond). Barristan will come back to the city to discover the Shavepate has effectively seized control of the Meereenese government in his absence, eliminating his political enemies and their children for good measure - and now that Barristan has helpfully deposed Hizdahr and won the battle for him, Skahaz has no further need to keep the old man around. So I imagine the end of Barristan will come as Barristan goes after Skahaz (perhaps after Skahaz orders him killed), and is cut down by the Shavepate’s loyal Brazen Beasts; tired from the battle, the old knight will be swarmed upon the masked men he already deeply distrusts. Barristan’s ending as such would be completely fitting with something I’ve been trying to emphasize as a recurring theme in ASOIAF: the fall of a protagonist can be tragic while still rooted in that protagonist’s own missteps and failures.

I also prefer this ending for Barristan for the impact it will have on Daenerys. I’ve said before that I could see Daenerys spending two chapters with the Dothraki - one killing Khal Jhaqo, and one being acclaimed in Vaes Dothrak - before returning to Meereen in or around “Daenerys III”. Daenerys will find on her return that her white knight is gone - the only other Westerosi in her crew (without Jorah), the connection between her and her family past, a man she thought she could trust. Wouldn’t you know it, though, a whole new crop of advisors will be there to help - Tyrion, Moqorro, and Marwyn, among their associates. Moreover, unlike Barristan, these men are not going to try to reign in her more violent side: Tyrion sees Daenerys as his means of getting back to Westeros and destroying his hated family; Moqorro and the red priests think Daenerys is the chosen of R'hllor, who feasts on human sacrifice; Marwyn clearly blames the “grey sheep” of the Citadel for killing the dragons before, so he’s about the last person who would try to keep her dragons locked away (on top of his interest in Daenerys as the martial “prince that was promised”). The loss of Barristan will help transition Daenerys into a full “fire and blood” mode I think she needs, thematically speaking, before she can become the humanity-saving hero at the end of ASOIAF.

Thinking on a meta level about this supposed turning cloak for Aegon, it would hardly be narratively surprising at this point for Daenerys to face another betraying counselor. The saga of Jorah’s betrayal and questionable loyalty has been a recurring theme even with Jorah out of her immediate circle, and the defection of Brown Ben Plumm to Yunkai was a major plot point in ADWD. Would it be interesting from a plot perspective to have her betrayed again by another trusted advisor? Certainly, it is possible that GRRM would repeat the same tactic, but there are surely other, more intriguing means Daenerys could face her prophesied “treasons” than by another counselor defecting from her service.

Consider also the structural integrity of TWOW and beyond. If GRRM chooses to bring back all alive POV characters for TWOW - and I cannot see a reason he would not, with the series escalating to its final climax - that means 20 separate main POV characters (compare to the 16 of ADWD, the book with the most separate POV characters so far). Unless each character gets a paltry number of chapters, I think it likely that GRRM will start winnowing down the POVs, killing them off to focus on the truly important viewpoints. Neither Daenerys nor Aegon has a need for Barristan to remain with them: Daenerys has her own POV as well as Tyrion’s in her area, while Aegon currently has JonCon and will soon have Arianne as well (and I’ll eat my hat if the Dornish princess doesn’t endeavor to make herself Aegon’s queen). Three POVs is a substantial amount to look at any character, particularly one who has “doomed” practically stamped on his forehead.

Finally, I very much doubt that the fight between Aegon and Daenerys lasts for a long time; indeed, I can see Daenerys having enough to do in TWOW that she doesn’t even reach Westeros until the very end of that book, and we instead end in King’s Landing with King Aegon VI on the Iron Throne. Would it really be sensible to keep Barristan around so long for a “civil war” that will last, in a generous calculation, for a handful of chapters? What would be the ultimate point to Barristan’s story then - that Daenerys is triumphant, and Barristan should never have left her? Would that be narratively fulfilling? You’re welcome to think so; but I do not.

The Queen Regent (NFriel)

anonymous asked:

what are your thoughts on King Aerys's Kingsguard? Do you think they were honorable knights are toadies who didn't uphold their vows?

Oof, that’s a loaded question. Bear with me because I have thoughts.

The Kingsguard are vital to GRRM’s interrogation of knighthood and his definition of a true knight; we’re meant to see how hard it is to live up to the ideals of knighthood in a world that allows for conflicting vows, how good knights in service to a bad cause handle it, how many of them dare to question the system itself, and how that reflects on their view of themselves and of the institution as a whole. Living up to the chivalric code is freaking hard which is precisely why it is the mark of a true knight.

So we have the kingsguard as a model of how crooked the current system is - this is an institution that is universally viewed as the embodiment of the chivalric code but its fundamental flaw - the fact the their vows to the king are taken to supersede their original vows to “be just [..] protect the young and the innocent [..] defend all women” even though the knighthood oath is the foundation on which the Kingsguard oath is built upon - effectively compromises that same code, exposing its oath to be hollow and presenting a conflict of morality that so many of the revered knights in Westeros fall to.

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Ice and Fire - The Dragon Prince and his Wolf Maid


“Prince Rhaegar loved his Lady Lyanna and thousands died for it” Barristan Selmy

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“Prince Rhaegar had two children,” Ser Barristan told him. “Rhaenys was a little girl, Aegon a babe in arms. When Tywin Lannister took King’s Landing, his men killed both of them. He served the bloody bodies up in crimson cloaks, a gift for the new king.” And what did Robert say when he saw them? Did he smile? Barristan Selmy had been badly wounded on the Trident, so he had been spared the sight of Lord Tywin’s gift, but oft he wondered. If I had seen him smile over the red ruins of Rhaegar’s children, no army on this earth could have stopped me from killing him.

// Henry Cavill as young Robert Baratheon, Golshifteh Farahani as Elia Martell

(requested by halemcjoel)

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When your brother Rhaegar led his army into battle at the Trident, men died for him because they believed in him, because they loved him, not because they’d been bought at a slaver’s auction. I fought beside the last dragon on that day, Your Grace. I bled beside him.                                                 Rhaegar fought valiantly,                                                                                                                                           Rhaegar fought nobly,                                                                                                                                                   and Rhaegar died.

As much as Jon looked like Lyanna, sometimes Ned would catch a glimpse of the dragon prince’s features in the little boy’s face. Even though no one looked for Rhaegar in Jon, Ned occasionally saw it and he always worried that someday someone else would too. That’s why Ned was relieved that Ser Barristan Selmy did not accompany the royal family to Winterfell. If it were possible for anyone else to see the last dragon in Jon Snow, it would have been Rhaegar’s old friend.

*breath in* …there is no canon evidence that Rhaegar/Lyanna’s relationship was not consensual beyond Robert Baratheon and fuckin Bran’s accounts. Look at Rob. Rob is biased as heck considering we know he was in love with Lyanna, almost possessive. He can not accept that Lyanna would love anyone other than him. On all other accounts he speaks favorably of Rhaegar. Look at Bran. He has no connection AT ALL to whatever happened- beyond hearing vaguely about it from other sources presumably. Even our pinnacle of Morality Ned talks highly of Rhaegar (i.e. thinks him the man above attending brothels). Why would he talk highly of the man who kidnapped his sister? Ser Barristan Selmy, who served three kings, thinks that Rhaegar would have been better then any of them! Daenerys is often compared to Rhaegar as a compliment! Cersei wanted to be married to him! Jon Connington was in love with him. The common people loved Rhaegar! Everyone loves Rhaegar! Rhaegar was a fuckin nerd. He loved reading and was often made fun of it as a child. Then he grew up into this badass and everyone was like ooOoOH but lemme remind you Rhaegar was a fuckin NERD. Rhaegar liked music ”loved his harp more than his lance). And he played all the time like a dweeb. His songs even made Lyanna cry because they were so beautiful. Rhaegar was sassy af. At the tournament at Harrenhal, he winter rose crown for the queen of love and beauty to Lyanna because she was Best Girl. Everyone was like “what abt your wife” and Rhaegar was like “fuck u lol.” When the rebellion started and whatever and Rhaegar was killed he diED WITH LYANNA’S NAME ON HIS LIPS. liKE– also LYANNA. This boss ass bitch wasn’t about to marry Robert aka Fuckboy #1. She had “the wolfblood” in her and was Arya v. 0. She was a good swordsman and horseman. Ned says that Rob never saw "the iron underneath.”and Lyanna new that Rob would cheat on her because he’s an Asshole. When Lyanna died, she was clutching her favorite blue winter roses like the ones Rhaegar gave to her. The symbolism here is obvious. Anyways Rhaegar and Lyanna are 2 badasses they deserve each other fuck Robert Baratheon and good day

theaceofwands  asked:

PQ! Another question about the Kingbreaker. Who is the man that dishonored Ashara Dayne at Harrenhal? How was she dishonored?

I think Ned slept with Ashara at Harrenhal, but that Barristan is wrong about it being dishonorable, and Harwin had the right of it: 

“When Ned met this Dornish lady, his brother Brandon was still alive, and it was him betrothed to Lady Catelyn, so there’s no stain on your father’s honor. There’s nought like a tourney to make the blood run hot, so maybe some words were whispered in a tent of a night, who can say? Words or kisses, maybe more, but where’s the harm in that? Spring had come, or so they thought, and neither one of them was pledged.”

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               a song of ice and fire aesthetics
                            ↳ houses of westeros [3/7]

anonymous asked:

Do you think Ned Stark was successful in anything? Your metas heavily emphasize his failures, faults, and shortcomings. Do you think there was anything he was good at other than being viewed as a good man and moral? I don't see many people acknowledging positive aspects of him-other than he loved his family and was relatively a 'good' person, but that seems to be done more to lighten the criticism of him. Why is he so beloved in the book if he was such a fuck up to his family and the North?

Um, should I not criticize him where criticism is due? Or when an issue he did not handle properly is being discussed? I criticize Ned but I do not denounce him. It’s not that I’m heavily emphasizing his faults but there are places where Ned erred, even if it was sympathetic or understandable in some occasions. I’m generally against considering only one aspect of Ned’s personality as an indication of who he is as a whole, be them his virtues or his faults. My analysis of his motivations or his actions in a certain event isn’t a blanket condemnation of the character or any attempt to argue that he is a fuck up or a bad person. Flawed, certainly, but not bad. Far from it actually. The text itself criticizes Ned  because he, like every other character GRRM writes, is not a saint. He is one of the good ones, but he is not an impeccable untouchable paragon of all that’s good and right. He stands out, certainly, since he is sometimes the only person to speak up against some truly vile things (like the fight with Robert over his condoning of Elia and her children’s murder, or the one over Robert’s command to assassinate a pregnant Daenerys, in which he was joined by Barristan Selmy) but, well, Mycah.

I can’t really speak for the entire fandom, neither do I know what tone the conversation around Ned usually takes, but for me, Ned’s merits and morals and successes are explicitly laid all over the text so I don’t usually feel the need to argue for them. This is the guy who is reputed for his honor across all of Westeros, who garnered the epithet of the honorable Ned Stark. Everyone, friend or foe, make a mention of his morals and honor. And it’s not that he is good at “being viewed” as moral, he genuinely is. Ned Stark is the last person who would perform morality or honor. We’re inside the man’s head, we see his thought process, this is his character and his moral code.

Now the narrative gives us two contrasting ideologies in Tywin Lannister’s and Ned Stark’s to serve as foils to each other, and then goes to bat for Ned’s. It’s a part of a larger body of stories that is meant to make a statement about the importance of upholding values and believing in ideals even when corrupt institutions and individuals ridicule and distort them, or even use them against you. A corrupt system can’t take your ideals away from you, no matter what. Ned’s story falls right in line with this message. His ideals win. His political theory wins. He wins. How can he, then, be considered a failure?

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Dragon Queen of Meereen

“Meereen was not her home, and never would be. It was a city of strange men with strange gods and stranger hair, of slavers wrapped in fringed tokars, where grace was earned through whoring, butchery was art, and dog was a delicacy. Meereen would always be the Harpy’s city, and Daenerys could not be a harpy.” Daenerys Targaryen

The first victim murdered by the Sons of the Harpy is brought to Daenerys at the Great Pyramid.

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No, your Grace. Thank the Gods. But the Mad King gave his enemies the justice he thought they deserved, and each time, it made him feel powerful and right, until the very end."— Ser Barristan Selmy

The king was shaded beneath a crimson canopy, one leg thrown negligently over the carved wooden arm of his chair. Princess Myrcella and Prince Tommen sat behind him. In the back of the royal box, Sandor Clegane stood at guard, his hands resting on his swordbelt. The white cloak of the Kingsguard was draped over his broad shoulders and fastened with a jeweled brooch, the snowy cloth looking somehow unnatural against his brown roughspun tunic and studded leather jerkin. “Lady Sansa,” the Hound announced curtly when he saw her. His voice was as rough as the sound of a saw on wood. The burn scars on his face and throat made one side of his mouth twitch when he spoke.
— 

ACOK, Sansa I


Wait, wait, wait…  a jeweled brooch and snowy white cloak on a guy that never wears ornamentation except for his Hounds helm!?!  He absolutely disdains pageantry and displays of material wealth as much as knighthood itself.  This is a pretty large departure from his usual self.  He’s likely doing more than just announcing her presence because his mouth is twitching, his signature tell he’s thinking something he isn’t saying.  That just screams “look at me” and "notice me.”  Well, mission accomplished, because she does give him her attention, except she notes those details mostly as being out of character.  Sandor’s acceptance of the white cloak now seems to be more about impressing Sansa, rather just resigning himself to the fact he doesn’t have any wife or lands and thus nothing better to do.              

He was there when Barristan Selmy was “retired” from the KG and let his cloak fall to the floor.  Sansa knelt on that cloak and begged for mercy for her father.  That image connecting her to the exemplary reputation of Barristan, a living legend of a knight must have stuck with him.  Then he is later presented with the opportunity to replace Barristan, which he’s seen as someone Sansa holds in high regard.  He still wants to distance himself though from the other kingsguard by choosing wool instead of silk and satin cloaks and he doesn’t wear the white armor, but there’s still that snappy jeweled brooch!  This is how he wants Sansa to see him and deep down how he wants to see himself. 

Looking back on his bragging of saving Sansa in the riot to Arya, acting like a true knight for her was probably his proudest moment.  It’s why he was kinda salty about her being late to thank him and why he re-wrote history of her singing the song then to culminate the fantasy.   If the story had followed the formula in Sandor’s head, it would have gone like:  save the fair maiden < she’s grateful to her hero < perfect opportunity to win her heart < he’s rewarded with more intimacy with her.  Life is not a song, of course.  Sandor is now set up to have his own struggles with the white cloak just the same as Jaime and Barristan…

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