self sustain

One day when you wake up, you will find that you have become a forest. You have grown roots and found strength in them that no one thought you had. You have become stronger and more beautiful, full of life giving qualities. You have learned to take all the negativity around you and turn it into oxygen for easy breathing. A host of wild creatures live inside you and you call them stories. A variety of beautiful birds rest inside your mind and you call them memories. You have become an incredible self sustaining thing of epic proportions. And you should be so proud of yourself, of how far you have come from the seeds of who you used to be.
—  Nikita Gill, You Have Become a Forest
4

Was so impatient to try some of my not-fully-grown produce today and it tasted heavenly 🌿

I live in the pacific. Outside of Africa, this is the number one place which demonstrates the failure of postcolonial nationalisms. Most of the island nations have independence from the colonial powers, and it means precisely shit because they are economically dominated from both within and without.

On one hand, by the global capitalist economy which these nations are absolutely dependent upon for material survival. The productive forces in postcolonial Pacific nation-states are extremely underdeveloped and non-self-sustainable. The dependency on international capital means that foreign interests are still in control of these lands. The only difference is that the colonial regime is now de facto. Explicit military occupation has ended in the former colonies because it is no longer necessary - the nation-state’s inability to respond to the global capitalist economy except by capitulating to it means that colonialism operates more smoothly and more productively than it ever did under de jure colonialism. 

On the other hand, postcolonial nationalism ends up centralising power in pre-existing materially privileged classes within the indigenous population. In Tonga, the traditional chieftainship consolidated itself into a monarchy; in Aotearoa, chiefly genealogical lines within iwi have essentially corporatised the tribal structure and established themselves as a CEO class. Nationalism provides no response for working class indigenous peoples to criticise this concentration of material political-economic power in the hands of indigenous capitalists. According to nationalism, the important distinction is between peoples’ ethno-national identities, not their actually existing relationship to material power. It doesn’t matter how much your labour is expropriated, how much your resources are appropriated, if the class who benefit from this process are “your” nation, then nationalism does not recognise exploitation to have occurred. Thus, the Tongan aristocracy appropriated millions upon millions of dollars from the labour of a population primarily sustaining itself by subsistence agriculture. 

Nationalism is a dead end. International proletarian revolution, which recognises the similar material relationship to production experienced by all working class people around the world, is the only way out of the crisis we’re facing. We have tried nationalism, and it’s gotten us brown managers to facilitate the expansion of capitalism - nothing more. We need better than that. We deserve better than that. We need to destroy capitalism on a global scale and build global communism, and using ethnonational identity is just a useless way of achieving that. I love my people, I love my tribe, I love my culture, but I’ll fucking burn a Tino Rangatiratanga flag before I accept that I have more in common with the brown bourgeoisie than the white proletariat. 

Concept: A self sustaining community of witches in the North American wilderness. We grow our own food, hunt, and take care of our land. Everyone has cute stone cottages. Local covens hold rituals in clearings along the edge of the town, and on Sabbaths, the whole community comes together for a giant festival in the town center.

Things I am looking forward to in the next season of ASOUE

Esme Squalor
Isadora Quagmire the giant lesbian
Making staples using tiny crabs
667 Dark Avenue
Esme Squalor
It takes a village to raise a child
The entire detective dupin costume because that is a look
Esme Gigi Genevieve Squalor
The self-sustaining air mobile home
Parsley soda
Special orphan running exercises
The city’s sixth most important financial advisor
E S M E S Q U A L O R

Sketch || Jughead Jones

Request from @carmineofmidgardHey !!i was wondering if you could write something with artist!reader x jughead fluff ? These are some Van Gogh quotes that I like, you could use them as like prompts: Art is to console those who are broken by life.

A/N: This my first oneshot ever written! I hope this fulfills your request!

Gif by @juptern

—————

“Art is to console those who are broken by life.” -Vincent Van Gogh

Saying you’ve had a tough life was an understatement. Your father had left the family when you were very little to be with his secretary leaving you and your mom alone. Your mom, while you adored her, kept pushing for you to become a doctor. She wanted you to have a successful and self-sustaining career; one that she never got to have. You on the other hand wanted to be an artist. Ever since your dad left, you loved to draw pictures of fantasy. Castles, dragons, princesses, and princes. Anything that could draw your mind away from your mom crying at night and less frequent phone calls from your happy father was a plus. Eventually, your drawings evolved into portraits. Well, secret portraits. You drew almost everyone in the school, but no one more than Jughead Jones III. Jughead fascinated you, and truth be told, you had a crush on him. How you could crush on someone that you knew nothing about and who didn’t even know your name was anyone’s best guess. As far as you could tell, the only thing you and Jughead had in common was the fact that you were both loners. That’s it.

You and Jughead had off fifth period and you both spent that time in the library, but not sitting next to each other or even near each other. Unfortunately, Reggie and his group also hung out in the library. It was an average Friday and you had just sat down in your chair in the library when Jughead came in, sitting in a chair across the room from you. Just as you pulled your sketchbook to draw, he pulled out his laptop to write. What he was writing, you had no idea. You began to draw the simple outlines of his face, gently moving your pen along the paper. You bit your lip and furrowed your eyebrows and you attempted to capture his facial structure and his emotions. You were so immersed with your drawing that you didn’t notice Reggie peering of your shoulder wearing a wolfish grin. He waited for the librarian to leave the room to copy some papers before he stood up and made his way over to you. Within the span of a second, Reggie quickly pulled the sketchbook from your hands, loudly proclaiming,

“Well, what do we have here, Y/N?”

Everyone in the library looked up from what they were doing, including Jughead. In a flash, you were on your feet, attempting to get your sketchbook back from Reggie.

“Give it back, Reggie!”

Reggie chortled as he looked through your sketches. He had struck gold.

“Everyone, look! Y/N’s got a thing for Norman Bates over here!”

Reggie held up your sketches for everyone to see. Panic and embarrassment flooded your senses and tears began to well up in your eyes as everyone began to laugh at you. Everywhere you looked you could see people laughing. Then you made eye contact with Jughead. He wasn’t laughing. He wasn’t even smiling. He was looking at you intensely, but he wasn’t glaring. There was a look of concern there as well. It was too much for you to bear and you quickly ran out of the library, down the hallway, and out of the school. Knowing you couldn’t go home without your mother knowing you were skipping class, you began the trek to Pop’s.

Pop knew you were upset the moment you walked into the diner. You were always so exuberant, always saying hello and asking him about his family first chance you got. But now? You were silent. Pop looked over at you and smiled softly.

“You want the usual?”

You nodded and sat in one of the booths, your back facing the door. Pop came over with a chocolate milkshake.

“It’s on me.” Pop said and winked.

You smiled gratefully at him and slowly sipped the milkshake, the familiar taste bringing you some relief. Then you remembered you left your backpack in the library. Your sketchbook. Reggie probably still had it. He was probably running copies of your sketches of Jughead to put up all over the school to humiliate you as much as he could. You felt the hot sting of tears coming back as you remembered the laughs and Jughead’s stare and quickly wiped them away. You didn’t know how long you were sitting there, just thinking about the day’s events before a jingle sounded out around the diner as the front door opened. You didn’t pay much attention to it, swirling your straw around the almost empty glass before you heard something being placed down on the floor beside you. You looked to your side and saw your backpack along with a figure standing right next to you. You knew those black pants and shoes. You froze as you realized who it was and slowly looked up, making eye contact for the second time that day with Jughead Jones III who had your sketchbook in his hand.

“I believe this is yours,” he said as he handed it to you.

You swallowed the lump in your throat as you shakily took the sketchbook back.

“Y/N, right?”

You nodded.

“Yes.”

Your quiet voice was raw from crying and Jughead took notice. He gestured to the seat in front of you.

“Can I sit?”

You nodded, not trusting your own voice. With a quiet “thanks,” he took a seat and the two of you were silent for a moment. You swallowed again. You had to say something.

“How did you know where I was?”

You mentally smacked yourself. Really, out of everything you could’ve said, that’s what your brain came up with? Jughead raised his eyebrows at you.

“I didn’t actually. I came here because I was gonna grab a bite to eat before dropping your stuff off at your house.”

Your cheeks became bright red as you imagined Jughead in your house. Not that you’ve fantasized about that way too many times.

“Well, um, thank you. For giving me back my sketchbook and backpack and all,” you said. “How did you get them back?”

You remembered Reggie’s mean laugh as he held the sketchbook above your head and flinched at the memory. Jughead chuckled at your question.

“It wasn’t easy, let’s just say that.”

You smiled for the first time since the morning and looked down.

“They’re really good,” Jughead said.

You looked up at him inquisitively.

“Your sketches I mean.”

Your heart plunged to your stomach again as you remembered his stare across the room. You looked down again.

“I’m sorry,” you said. “It probably looks like I’m some weird stalker or something.”

You were silent as you waited for his response.

“Aw, that’s a shame,” Jughead said and you looked up at him again, confused by his nonchalant response. “I was kinda hoping you were. Would’ve made a great storyline for my novel.”

He smirked at you and you, realizing he was joking, smiled along with him. Jughead pointed at your empty glass.

“Can I buy you another milkshake?”

You smiled.

“I’d like that.”

—————

A/N: I hope that was okay! Let me know what you thought!

Being around people who do not share similar values// who do not care about similar things as I is exhausting. They start to annoy me after a while.

So either I’m a grade A bitch or just… levelling up on my self love because I am not going to spend time with people who exhaust me anymore.

you know something i really love? tony’s touch screen devices. more specifically, how they can execute tremendously complex and specific tasks with very little input

like oh. choose This Option in the menu, tap the phone twice, voila. you have commandeered a screen being used by some high profile government committee. tap the wristwatch a couple of times, and press this one button? congratulations, you have hacked into the security profile of a supermax facility

i mean do you understand how much prior work probably goes into this shit? tony and his all-purpose hacking buttons?? i fucking love it. it’s so fucking fake. it’s “i invented self-sustaining clean energy using scraps in a cave” and “i hacked into the pentagon in high school on a dare” and “i have an AI that literally casually compiles confidential information from SHIELD, FBI, and CIA because i asked” levels of super fake. it’s unadulterated superhero bullshit and holy fuck i love it

Going off the grid: Why more people are choosing to live life unplugged

For people who want to get away from today’s consumerist society, living off-grid can be an attractive option.

Imagine living off the land, producing your own food and energy and getting away from the consumption economy that drives so many of our decisions. For more and more people, off-grid living has become the way to go. Although statistics on Americans who choose to take this route are hard to come by, trends suggest that the number is increasing. Some people do it to be self-reliant or more in touch with nature. Many go off-grid to step away from society. Still others do it because it is the most financially viable option available to them.

“Going off the grid is not a game,” says Nick Rosen, founder of the Off-Grid website and author of “Off the Grid: Inside the Movement for More Space, Less Government, and True Independence in Modern America” (Penguin Books). “It is real life and a real choice for real people.”

Rosen says people go off the grid for a variety of reasons, and they vary how deeply they go off-grid. “You can’t get off all of the grids all the time,” he says. “It’s a question of which grids you choose to get off of and in what way and for how long.” Some people live off the grid part of the year for leisure purposes, taking a few months off from their jobs so they can live in a more relaxed manner. Others get themselves off the public electrical or water systems but still participate in what Rosen calls the “car grid” or the “supermarket grid” or “bank grid.”

Off-grid is green
Book cover for Off the Grid by Nick RosenAlthough a desire to go green isn’t usually the primary driver for people going off-grid, the lifestyle has many environmental benefits. For one thing, most off-grid homes or communities are in places where nature plays an important part of their everyday lives. “You become much more aware of the sun and the wind because you need it to power yourself,” Rosen says. For another, people who are living off-grid do not tend to fill their lives with the same amount of stuff as your average consumer. “We’re all consuming too much. One of the big motivations for off-grid living is a weariness of the consumer society. It’s not necessarily anti-consumer, but post-consumer.”

Off-grid homes also eschew the American tendency toward overly large residences. “We’re over-housing ourselves,” Rosen says. “That’s been very big feature of American society since the ‘50s: The overly large house with the big heating and cooling bills, storing vast amounts of unnecessary possessions.” Although off-grid housing varies in size and scope and energy needs, Rosen estimates that the average off-grid residence uses about 20 percent of the energy consumed by a typical American home.

Another green factor is a lowered reliance on transportation. Although people living off the grid still own vehicles, they use them much less frequently. “You may only need it once a week or once a month,” Rosen says.

Other motivations: Fear and finances
Some off-grid people do it to get away. “Perhaps the biggest motivation at the moment is a loss of trust in the government and the ability of social networks to look after us,” Rosen says. These are people who feel as if society no longer provides the sense of safety that they require.

For others, going off-grid is an economic necessity brought about by hard times. “A lot of the people I met when I was traveling around the States writing my book were people who had to hand back the keys to their properties and find a new lifestyle. In one case they bought some land on eBay and moved themselves into a trailer. And they find themselves living a more ecological lifestyle just by the fact that they’re generating their own electricity and growing their own food, but they were motivated by financial matters rather than by more pure desire to tread more lightly on the planet.”

How much do you really need?
Rosen says most families could go off the grid with as little as a half an acre, “as long as it’s the right half-acre.” Ideal locations would have some woodland, an area for agriculture, enough light for solar power and a good source of water, either a well or a stream. “The era of 40 acres and a mule has been replaced by the era of a half an acre and a laptop and a solar panel,” he says.

But even a half an acre can be a lot of work — too much for most people, Rosen says. “You’re giving yourself a lot to do if you’re running your own power plant, dealing with your own water supply, disposing of your own waste and pulling your own food.”

Instead of going it alone, many people form off-grid communities. “The best way to get off-grid is to go off with others in a group of families, so each have half an acre and share resources and skills,” Rosen says. “One is tending livestock and one is growing vegetables, while a third is looking after the power supply for everybody else.”

The next generation?
Going off the grid today doesn’t mean reinventing the wheel. “The existence of the Internet that has made living off the grid a real choice and a real possibility for so many people,” Rosen says. Websites like his own provide lessons and plans and advice for off-grid living, as well as a sense of community for people who might otherwise be physically isolated from each other.

In addition, some off-the-grid communities are ready for new people to join them. “There’s a huge generation of 1970s back-to-the-land movement people who are now getting pretty old and they’re sitting on these huge tracks of land that can’t be broken up,” Rosen says. These communities are looking for young people to buy their way in. “The idea of land trusts is being used as a way these older people can get some new residents to help look after them and then work on the land or take over part of the land as the older generation dies out.”

Rosen says his own ambition is to create an off-grid village of 300 or so homes in his native England, provided he can find a local zoning board willing to allow it. “I think there’s a huge demand for off-grid living that can’t be satisfied because the places where you’d want to live off the grid are the places you can’t get permission to do so,” he says.

Written by: John Platt

Maximum cultural development
(Revolutionary mentality)

1. Study oriented: reads, evaluates and debates books, newspapers, magazines and scholarly journals. Excepts the challenges of education.

2. Worker: looks for ways in which to actively work for self may hold a job outside in order to sustain self and family. Self-reliant.

3. Organized and systematic. Efficient and diligent.

4. Progressively collective; conscious of others and cooperative.

5. Family oriented: regards mate as a partner in struggle; loves children. Values trust in relationships.

6. Land conscious: realizes that the only thing that nobody’s making any more of this land.

7. Disciplined: strong, unyielding and energetic.

8. Serious. Practices Fairplay, order and punctuality. Honest and dependable.

9. Analytical and critical.

10. Frugal: buys mainly on a need basis; saves.

11. Social life is developmental and involves children.

12. Creatively aggressive: will dare of the impossible if it is possible.

13. Respects elders.

14. Dislikes incompetence and mediocrity.

15. Fights against black on black crime and understands that it’s root is white on black crime.

16. Loves black art, music and literature.

17. Can give and follow instructions. Encourages experimentation and criticism.

18. Committed to black liberation, local, national and international.

19. Does not use drugs.

20. Politically active. Not crisis oriented Acts on information rather than reacts. Plans for the long term; alert; prepared for change.

21. Self-confident. Respects others regardless of race or culture.

22. Understands the economic forces that control our lives on the local, national and international level.

23. Rational and decisions and actions.

24. Rewards merit and achievement.

Haki Madhubuti
Black men: obsolete, single, dangerous? The Afrikan family in transition
page 8

Are you a young person that ditched suburban/urban life to live off-grid, go WWOOFing, be more self-sustainable, live more simply, and/or be closer to nature?

I’m planning a new nonfiction work about Young People Divorcing Themselves from the Suburbs/Cities, who and why and how. If you consider yourself one of these people and would consent to an email interview (or maybe even down the line, a meetup or visit!) please let me know! I’d love to hear your story and include it in a future published work. It’s a phenomenon I’ve been observing among my friends and peers and think it deserves a good, honest documentation. 

Email me at marandart@gmail.com with the subject line, “Divorced from the Suburbs”. (It’s kind of the working title.)