selective colours

Da, da, da, daaaaaaaa…… that’s a little more dramatic than I had intended. I love all these wonderful Sai tutorials that get posted on here but I haven’t seen much attention payed to Sai’s Lineart tool which I can’t get enough of. I’m sure there probably are Lineart Layer tutorials out there - I just haven’t come across one so I’m just adding to the pile. The Lineart tool is so awesome it deserves any number of tutorials anyway. It’s so easy to use, it saves me so much time, and it offers so much control which I really love. Honestly, the tool is so easy to use that this is less of a tutorial and more of just a general encouragement to just whip it out and start playing with it. Yeah. So say we start with a simple line like this swirly-wirly thingy that I drew with the marker tool. Well, the first step would be to create a linework layer by clicking the linework layer button.

There we go. Now, a lineart layer in Sai is different from any other regular layer in Sai and it will bring up a completely new range of tools. I’m gonna briefly go through them but the best way to understand exactly what each does is to just try them out for yourself. There’s no substitute for experience or however the saying goes.

  • Pen - This is your freehand lineart tool and to best honest I don’t really use it that often. That’s just me personally. I have an expensive gaming rig that has all sorts of magic running under the hood but we all know that Sai’s memory management is pretty crappy and I don’t need the lag or crashes that come with this tool when working at a high DPI. You may have a different, entirely pleasant experience with this particular tool but for me, if I’m doing freehand inking, I’d much rather just use the regular Pencil tool.
  • Eraser - Kinda speaks for itself.
  • Weight - This one I do love. Say you’ve drawn a line - or a path as Sai calls it. With this tool you can adjust the thickness of the particular line by simply selecting the brush size and then clicking on the line.
  • Color - Same as Weight. Simply select your desired colour and then select the desired line you’d like to change. Very useful. For the aesthetic.
  • Edit - This one comes with its own subset of mini-tools that I’ll get into in a moment. But this is definitely a useful tool - for me it’s probably the most useful.
  • Pressure - This is the one that adds the character to your linework. I’ll explain further below.
  • SelPen - A selection tool. Pretty standard. Since the Lineart layer works in ‘Anchor’ points (which again, I’ll get in to further down below) I don’t really use this one.
  • SelErs - Selection Erase. Goes hand in hand with the SelPen. I can’t say that I personally use this one  much.
  • Curve & Line - The Curve and the Line tools are the cornerstones of the Linework layer. I’m explain both further down.

The Edit tool, as I mentioned, brings up its own list of sub-tools. And they definitely have their uses. Again, it’s best to play around with them to truly get a grasp of what they do but I’ll just run through them quickly before I get on with the main tutorial.

  • Select - For selecting anchor points of paths. Honestly, I don’t really use this one too much simply because hovering over a point or path and clicking will select it.
  • Move/Add - Now this one I use a lot. Moving an anchor will affect the curvature of your line if you’ve used the ‘Curve’ tool, or you can add curves to a straight line by clicking and dragging in between anchor points.
  • Delete CP/Curve - Kinda speaks for itself. It will delete an achor point in your line. Sometimes this can be useful for making your curves rounder if you’ve added too many points to it.
  • Deform Path - Again, kinda self explanatory. It will warp your line. I don’t really use this one myself but that’s not to say that it couldn’t have its uses.
  • Deform Anchor - See above.
  • Move Path - Instead of moving just an anchor or adjusting the curvature of your line you can move the entire line at once. Can be useful.
  • Duplicate Path - Does exactly what it says - creates a copy of your line. Haven’t found much use for this simply because I don’t particularly like copy/paste stuff in linework. Faults or differences add character.
  • Delete Path - deletes a line you’ve drawn independently of other lines on your linework layer. Can be useful as well.
  • Connect CPs - This is difficult to explain the benefits of. It’s one that should be experimented with. It basically joins lines together. I use it quite often. Just pick this option and drag from one anchor point to another to join them.
  • Pointed/Rounded - See the diagram below for this one. I find it very useful.

As you can see I used the Curve tool to draw a simple curve (left) and then I used the Pointed/Rounded tool to convert the curve into a point (right) by selecting the tool and then clicking on the anchor point at the height of the curve. I find it very useful. Anyway, back to our swirly-wirly thingy.

Because our swirly-wirly thingy is basically one long curve, I simply select the curve tool and start clicking. Starting at the centre point on one end, I click to add anchor points as I trace the shape of the object. Each point adjusts the curvature from the last point. It’s kinda hard to explain verbally or even visually but try it out and you’ll quickly see how it works.

Once I have a line over whatever I’m inking done I like to adjust the weight to suit my preferences. I like to work with thicker lines because they give more room to play around with weight. So to adjust the weight you click on the Weight tool, select a brush size and then click on your line. If only it were that simple in life.

Once I have a good weight selected I move on to the Pressure tool. The pressure tool gives you two options. Pressure for width and pressure for density. Width is like controlling the weight of the line at individual points and density controls the transparency. I don’t usually use the density option. As with traditional inking I prefer to denote depth, shadow, etc. with weight as you can see in the image above. To adjust the pressure, simply select the pressure tool and then select an anchor point. Click, hold and drag to the left to make the line thinner of more transparent and to the right to make the line thicker and more dense. As you drag, a percentage will appear over the anchor point you’ve selected. This can be useful for keeping things consistent.

That’s all well and good for curved lines but what about straight lines? That’s where the line tool comes in. It works exactly the same way except it won’t add a curvature to your anchor pints. Still very useful though. Especially when combined with the Weight and Pressure tools.

Here’s an example of one my drawings. It’s Dark Empress Kitana from Mortal Kombat. The one in red is the pencils which if converted to black would probably make a pretty good linework layer. I’m a firm believer in taking the time to clean up your sketch/pencils layer because it will dictate your entire drawing. The one below in black was done using Sai’s linework layer feature. Although not entirely.

As much as I love Sai’s linework layer, it can look a little too clean which is not great when you’re drawing people. Although, it’s all art so it’s all up to personal preferences and personal style. There’s no wrong way to do it. For me though, I prefer to do skin, facial features, hair, etc. by hand using Sai’s Pencil tool on a normal layer and reserve the Linework Layer for architecture, clothing or any non-organic substances. I inked Kitana’s eyes and eyebrows freehand ( or as freehand as you can be with Sai’s amazing stabilisers) but everything else such as her armour or her fan weapon thingy was done using the Curve and Line tools on the Linework Layer.

I hope this tutorial has been useful. Or if not useful - then at least encouring to try out Sai’s linework layer. It’s such a robust feature that I don’t see get much attention and I can’t even begin to describe how much time it saves me or how much I adore it. If you have any questions (because I’m well aware how unsuited I am to writing tutorials - this is so damn rambly - sorry!) then feel free to drop me an ask here at keithbyrneart.

P.S, sorry about my handwriting in the stills. It’s gotten a lot messier these days.

3

100 Days of Youtube - (61/100)

↳ IS IT PAINFUL TO DIE?! - Dan and Phil play Google Feud #2

8

Darlin’, darlin’, stand by me, oh, stand by me, oh, stand now, stand by me
Stand by me, whenever you’re in trouble, won’t you stand by me?

Happy birthday to my fandom twin and gif sister, the lovely @natsusluce  
I know you love both nalu and this song Sara, so have them combined! (31.05.17)

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1000 followers gift


i don’t even know what to say, thankyou so much for your support. pardon my absence for this little while, school work can sometimes just take over and i can’t figure a way of getting back. this took quite a while, but its totally worth it for you pals. I love hearing from you and being in this community, so once again- thankyou  ★~(◡‿◡✿) *new merged download link at the bottom*


Veggie Jumpas’

a selection of comfy winter tops, featuring a few shoutouts to the veggies.they say:

1. “grass fed” 2. “veggie-saurus” 3.”vegan” 4.”eating veggies for christmas” 5.”vegetarian” 6.”#veganpower” -this is the one in the preview.

new mesh. suitable for all genders ❤

(ノ゚ο゚)ノミ  download


Big Belted Bad Boy Jeans

featuring holes, wOw!1 to give you those chilly legs this winter

suitable for all genders ❤

(ノ゚ο゚)ノミ  download


Swishy Skirts

i just wanted something simple that you can wear with some tights, 

suitable for all genders ❤

(ノ゚ο゚)ノミ  download


Smile for a While matte lipsticks

i wanted a cute lil’ selection of weird colours. voila!

i think you’ll need get together. 

suitable for all genders ❤

(ノ゚ο゚)ノミ  download

Hello graphic makers!! You’re probably aware that there is a huge problem on tumblr with whitewashing. Or maybe you’re not. As a predominantly disney-based blogger, the whitewashing I personally see are from the disney fandom, so I’m going to use screencaps from those movies to show you several quick techniques so you’ll see just how easy it is to have your pretty bright and pastel colour palettes and not whitewash characters of colour.

Keep reading

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stylized fur tutorial. thanks for the question! i’ve been getting quite a few requests regarding how i paint fur, but honestly even i don’t have a set procedure for it yet orz

still i thought i would take a few moments to randomly blob out a clump of fur just to see for myself what techniques i’m using right now. so for brushes, i generally like using the watercolour ones. i have two atm, one set to a larger min. diameter (with high ease of mixing), and another set to a smaller min diameter (with low ease of mixing and high load colour).

  • (1) i use the smaller brush first to sketch in the general fur shapes, they’re pretty big at this stage, we’ll be adding in smaller clumps later
  • (2 - 3) using the larger watercolour brush now, i blob in a few shadows - keeping in mind the light source. i then select a lighter colour and make the brush smaller to make the definition between the light and shade sharper.
  • (4 - 7) now i take out the smaller brush again and refine the edges and points! i also use it to quickly add extra tufts of fur and then i’ll switch back to the larger brush to blend the new tufts in. and i basically keep doing this until i’m satisfied with the level of detail.
  • (8) i adjusted the levels to make the contrast higher. you can do this to make the character blend into whatever environment you’re painting them in.
  • (9) added colour with an overlay layer! although tbh i usually paint in colour to begin with in most of my drawings. but overlay/add layers are still super helpful for creating nice lighting effects and interest! you can add highlights and rim lighting at this stage too~

hope this was helpful!

5

#that’s a smart girl tactic for ‘don’t mess with me bitch’

anonymous asked:

idk if i already asked this, but how do you only use 5-6 adjustment layers? it's my greatest struggle in making gifs. I can NEVER do that. I use like 10 layers max to get the look I want. although the gif makers' tips I look at always say to keep it 5-6 layers :/

Hey there! I’ve received a similar ask, and I had yet to reply to it cause I’m so behind with replying to everyone due to lack of time, so if it was you, I’m so sorry!

Before I get into anything though, I’d like to say that…. you really shouldn’t let what all the other giffers say condition what you do. What works for others may not work for you, and if you’re happy with how your colouring turns out, what does it matter if it takes you a few more layers than other people? We all colour in different ways, and obviously tutorials and advices are super useful and they can teach you some stuff you had yet to discover and it’s always great to improve, but at the end of the day what’s important is the result and if you’re happy with yours, don’t pay too much attention to what other people say or do.

The thing I always stress about is making tiny adjustments, cause if you go super crazy with those, you just end up reducing the quality of the gif, by bringing out pixels.

How the hell do I only use 5/6 layers when I’m making tiny adjustments? Well, it depends on the layers you use and how you use them.

I end up using a couple more layers if I’m making a colour porn gifset, cause I abuse of selective colour, but generally I just use curves, brightness/contrast, exposure, selective colour, colour balance and photo filter. 

Out of all them, curves is the one that will impact your gif the most, and will make you lose less layers after, if you use it correctly. And by using it correctly I mean if you use the eyedrop tool with the white tip:

What this tool does is it turns whatever colour you click on with it into the whitest point of your gif, brightening everything accordingly. This is very useful especially if you’re giffing a dark scene! I’ve talked a bit about this tool here.

Everything is going to make more sense once you start using it, cause the more you practice with it, the more you get the hang of it! 

What you want to do once you click on it is to click on the lightest point of your scene. Keep in mind that it’s going to turn that point into white, so if you choose a dark colour your entire gif is going to look like crap. You want to choose as close to white as you can, but if you choose actually white, it’s not going to do much of anything at all. 

Now, you also need to keep in mind that this tool is going to affect the tone of your gif, based on which colour you pick, so if you pick a yellowish colour, it’s going to change the tone of the gif into blue, if you pick yellow it’s gonna make everything blue-ish and so on, going in the opposite way (so it’s very useful for those movies/tv shows that have a terrible yellow filter and such). 

Example:

if I were to pick that light green/blue colour behind harley (the red dot)

my gif would turn like this:

see? that colour turned into white, the gif was brightened accordingly, but since I chose a blue/green-ish colour, now the tone is reddish!

If I were to pick harley’s hair where it’s lighter instead:

I’d get this:

much better, right? 

A lot of this is trial by error. You’re going to need to click on a lot of stuff and undo it until you find a combo that works for your scene, but the more you use this tool, the more you understand how it works and the easier it gets!

Now you see why I would only need a couple more layers to be happy with my gif! And that’s by only using one tool, curves! Notice also how despite the fact that it’s a dark scene with shitty lighting, it got brightened straight away without bringing out pixels/lowering the quality!

You can achieve great results with a few layers, you just have to use the right ones ;)

I was thinking of many ways to introduce this post but I really just decided to go with - stop yo whitewashing

You can still achieve your pretty pastel without whitewashing. I’m sure most of you have been on tumblr long enough to know why it’s wrong and why there isn’t an excuse. So I made this ‘cause I’ve been seeing a lot of whitewashed Bill edis and with two beautiful poc cast as companions for the next series, I could no longer hold my tongue. 

The first gif is a PSD without any adjustments. This is obviously whitewashing and making her skin lighter and there’s no excuse based on ‘artistic license’. Whitewashing is what it is. If it’s your style to make gifs so pale they whitewash poc then you either have to change your style or not gif poc. You can still achieve your aesthetic without whitewashing,

with just a few adjustments. 

TIPS & TRICKS UNDER THE CUT; [plural may be deceiving… It’s one simple tip]

Keep reading

SHORTCUT TO GETTING THE RIGHT SKIN TONE!

So something that I know can be an issue is accidental white washing for some characters in Camp Camp. I wanna help fix that! If you use paint tool sai, or any art program, this will be useful!

Step one: right click and copy a reference picture

Step two: go to your art program, file, paste

Step three: select the dropper tool and select the base colour of the skin

Step four: choose an area for the skin tone. Right click, and set the colour.

Congrats! You got the skin colour! If you want, you can designate a whole area for their colour palette for more than just skin by repeating this process.

There you are! Hope this helps.

  • Question: My teenage children are mad about rock ‘n’ roll. I don’t mind, but between them they have socks, pullovers and slacks which are fluorescent, and I am worried in case these are harmful to their health. Surely things that are luminous in the dark are usually radioactive, which, I take it, could be dangerous.
  • Answer: You’ll be relieved to know that these clothes, so popular with teenagers (particularly the rock ‘n’ rollers), have been tested for radioactivity, and there is none. So there should be no danger at all, except to anyone who is sensitive to the kinds of colours they select!
  • quoted from Woman’s Realm, a British magazine. April 12, 1958