seitan burger

anonymous asked:

Hi, I was just wondering if you had any vegan food recommendations in London?

London is a big city so obviously there are tonnes of vegan-friendly places to eat. Here are some popular ones and my favourites: 

  • birdie’s – best soy latte in the city + good vegan breakfasts
  • club mexicana – tacos, burritos, deep fried cheeze 🌯
  • franco manca – sourdough pizza, get #1 and lots of garlic oil!
  • the full nelson – american-style good stuff
  • itadaki zen – vegan sushi is my favourite food! 🍣🍙 
  • mildred’s – simple, reasonably priced but still delicious, wide range of foods, big portions
  • manna – something different
  • v burger – seitan / falafel / quinoa burgers 🍔

I also recommend @katelouisepowell‘s list of vegan-friendly chains, and remember that really fancy places should be able to cater to vegans, just ring ahead. I heave eaten at sketch and claridge’s and they can both do vegan food if you let them know, so always give it a try! 

one-choked-his-little-self  asked:

Hey, I'm looking to lower my carbs again but with less meat. Any advice on big fat sources (other than eggs and nuts which I'm officially sick of) that are cheaper? I remember you saying you're a veggie ketoer :)

heeey girl, the struggle is real I feel you, although I fail to comprehend how one gets sick of nuts but anyway FAT FAT FAT:

MILK AND STUFF:

  • hard cheeses like swiss and cheddar
  • grated or shredded cheeses like parmesan, romano and gruyere
  • string cheeses like mozzarella (mmm)
  • curd cheeses like ricotta, cottage cheese and dry curd or farmer’s cheese
  • Whole milk unsweetened (plain) kefir (higher protein than yogurt and lower carb) - I’ve never tried this but I’ve heard about it. I prefer just drinking unsweetened almond milk though
  • Cream cheese (flavoured or not, but unsweetened and full fat) like my bae brie
  • Greek yoghurt, plain and full fat (and then dump it with nut butters, seeds, berries, can even make layers between chia seed pudding mmm)

YA MAIN EATS:

  • seeds - I storm through chia seeds and I also recommend flax seed, i love pumpkin seeds too though and sunflower seeds are the best for pancakes imo (I know you’re not a bird but make it a habit to chuck ‘em on as edible decoration)
  • olives
  • avocado
  • oils - olive, coconut, sesame etc go wild
  • nut flours (almond almond almond)
  • tofu

PREPACKAGED LAZY DAYS:

(I only know of these 3 so far)

  • Quorn - I’ve tried their fake meat and it’s not bad at all and the price is okay for my broke ass
  • Seitan
  • Boca Burgers

I would say though, that I personally stick to nut butters, oils, avocados, seeds and a little cheese for my fats because my mum does most of the shopping,

SHE NEVER BUYS OLIVES THOUGH

EAT THEM OLIVES

and good luck <3

anonymous asked:

Hello! I really want to become a vegetarian but I'm not sure how to eat correctly, I want to get enough of protein and that stuff l, could you help me by giving some tips or links to some guides? I love your account very much!

Hi there! Thank you ♥♥ Protein is very easy to get, it doesn’t have to come from an animal, take a look at this info:

Protein: 

The little known truth about protein is that most of us get too much, not too little of it. Women need about 45 grams per day and men need around 55 grams. One cup of tofu contains about 20 grams of protein, so women, eat some tofu and you’re almost halfway there! Lots of foods contain protein and if you’re eating a well-balanced diet, you’re probably consuming more than enough protein without even thinking about it. Even though it’s quite easy to get plenty of protein on a vegan diet, its a good idea to make sure you’re eating a variety of protein-rich foods. Here are some high protein vegan foods to include in your diet: tofu, seitan,veggie burgers, soy, lentils, chickpeas, nuts and seeds, brown rice and whole grains.

  • Tempeh -  41 g per cup
  • Lentils – 18 g per cup
  • Plain soymilk – 11 g per cup
  • Edamame – 20 g per cup
  • Seitan – 19 g per 3 ounces
  • Tofu – 20 g per ½ cup
  • Peas – 9 g per cup
  • Brown rice – 5 g per cup
  • White rice – 4 g per cup
  • Cooked broccoli – 4 g per cup
  • Sunflower seeds – 6 g per ¼ cup
  • Quinoa – 9 g per cup
  • Cooked spinach – 5 g per cup
  • Avocado – 4 g per cup
  • Whole grain bread – 7 g in 2 slices
  • Black beans – 15 g per cup
  • Cashews – 5 g per ¼ cup
  • Cooked semolina pasta – 8 g per cup
  • Chia seeds – 5 g per 2 tablespoons
  • Flax seeds – 4 g per 2 tablespoons
  • Bulgur – 5.5 g per cup
  • Peanut butter – 8 g per 2 tablespoons
  • Sunflower seed butter – 5.5 g per 2 tablespoons
  • Baked red potato – 3 g per cup

USDA Nutrition Database. And another great website to learn about nutrition is Vegan Health

indigo-childd  asked:

I live in northern California and barely make enough to pay my rent. I feel an extreme surplus of guilt eating cheap animal bi-products to get by. What are cheap, healthy, and protein - filled foods you might recommend?

Hi indigo-childd ! Actually getting protein shouldn’t be expensive, I barely use substitutes and I cook almost everything from scratch, I even save money and I couldn’t do that before with an omnivore diet. 

Here are some other high protein vegan foods to include in your diet: tofu, seitan, veggie burgers, soy, lentils, chickpeas, nuts and seeds, brown rice and whole grains.

  • Tempeh -  41 g per cup
  • Lentils – 18 g per cup
  • Plain soymilk – 11 g per cup
  • Edamame – 20 g per cup
  • Seitan – 19 g per 3 ounces
  • Tofu – 20 g per ½ cup
  • Peas – 9 g per cup
  • Brown rice – 5 g per cup
  • White rice – 4 g per cup
  • Cooked broccoli – 4 g per cup
  • Sunflower seeds – 6 g per ¼ cup
  • Quinoa – 9 g per cup
  • Cooked spinach – 5 g per cup
  • Avocado – 4 g per cup
  • Whole grain bread – 7 g in 2 slices
  • Black beans – 15 g per cup
  • Cashews – 5 g per ¼ cup
  • Cooked semolina pasta – 8 g per cup
  • Chia seeds – 5 g per 2 tablespoons
  • Flax seeds – 4 g per 2 tablespoons
  • Bulgur – 5.5 g per cup
  • Peanut butter – 8 g per 2 tablespoons
  • Sunflower seed butter – 5.5 g per 2 tablespoons
  • Baked red potato – 3 g per cup

USDA Nutrition Database

Check out this other resources too!

shewholovesthemoon  asked:

I've recently become vegan (like within the last few days) and I'm so proud of myself for doing the right thing, I'm just nervous that I might not be getting enough nutrients in my body. How can I be sure that I am getting what I need? I have information about what nutrients I need and such, but I'm unsure of just how much I need. Can you help me out?(:

Hey there! Congrats ♥♥♥

If you're eating a well-balanced diet with plenty of whole grains, fruits and vegetables, you are eating one of the healthiest diets on the planet. You do, however, need to make sure you get a few vital nutrients. 

  • Protein

The little known truth about protein is that most of us get too much, not too little of it. Women need about 45 grams per day and men need around 55 grams. One cup of tofu contains about 20 grams of protein, so women, eat some tofu and you’re almost halfway there! Lots of foods contain protein and if you’re eating a well-balanced diet, you’re probably consuming more than enough protein without even thinking about it. Even though it’s quite easy to get plenty of protein on a vegan diet, its a good idea to make sure you’re eating a variety of protein-rich foods. Here are some high protein vegan foods to include in your diet: tofu, seitan,veggie burgers, soy, lentils, chickpeas, nuts and seeds, brown rice and whole grains.

  • Calcium

If you’re a smoker, you will need to get more calcium, as your absorption and retention levels are lower. Strong bones throughout life come from both calcium in the diet and exercise, so for optimum health, be sure you get both. Here’s some calcium-rich foods to try: spinach, collard greens, kale, soy milk, fortified orange juice, sesame seeds,tahini, broccoli, almonds, carrots, and rice milk. Be sure to shake your soy milk and orange juice before drinking, as the calcium can settle to the bottom.

  • Iron

A study published in the British Journal of Nutrition found that iron levels in vegans in the UK were, on average, higher than those of the general population, showing that it’s possible to get more than enough iron on a vegan diet. Just like with protein, however, you should still be sure to eat a balanced diet to ensure you are getting enough iron. Drinking coffee and tea, particularly with meals, can limit your absorption and should be consumed at least three hours before a meal. For an iron boost, try eating tofu, lentils, spinach, soy, chickpeas and hummus. Vitamin C also increases the absorption of iron, so if you take an iron supplement, wash it down with some orange juice!

  • B12

Many people disagree about whether or not vegans need a B12 supplement. I like to go with “better safe than sorry” on this one. B12 deficiency is extremely rare amongst both vegans and non-vegetarians alike, but is a serious issue when it does occur.

There are a few things vegans should know about B12.

  • Your body has the ability to store B12 for a number of years, so if you’re newly vegan, you may have sufficient reserves for another decade, but unless you have your B12 levels tested regularly there is no way of knowing.
  • Nutritional yeast is the best food source for B12.
  • Although nutritional yeast is a great source and an incredibly tasty addition to just about everything, some doctors suggest its best not to rely on a single source and recommend taking a vitamin supplement at least once a week, even if you regularly eat nutritional yeast. So if you’re vegan, please be better safe than sorry and take a supplement at least once a week.
  • Once again, if you’re a smoker, your body will lose nutrients, so you need extra B12.
  • Expectant mothers and infants have special B12 needs as well. If you’re vegan and expecting, take a supplement everyday.
  • I eat unwashed foods from my garden. Remember B12 comes from the earth. I don’t take any supplements of B12 for now and I don’t have any deficiency.
  • Many products comes fortified with B12 already, check the nutritional labels.

As a vegan, you will lower your cholesterol and have a greatly reduced risk for colon cancer, heart disease and high blood pressure. There is a big difference, however, between eating a vegan diet of french fries and soda, and a well-balanced plant-based diet. If you’re still exploring how to be vegetarian or vegan, its likely that you’re not as familiar with your body’s nutritional needs so its a good idea to take a multi-vitamin. 

marywanna27  asked:

How do you get enough protein? I went full vegan once and had to stop because I became ill. Now I rarely eat meat but try to get protein when I need it. Any suggestions on good protein filled foods or vitamins you take?

Hi there @marywanna27!

The little known truth about protein is that most of us get too much, not too little of it. Women need about 45 grams per day and men need around 55 grams. One cup of tofu contains about 20 grams of protein, so women, eat some tofu and you’re almost halfway there! Lots of foods contain protein and if you’re eating a well-balanced diet, you’re probably consuming more than enough protein without even thinking about it. Even though it’s quite easy to get plenty of protein on a vegan diet, its a good idea to make sure you’re eating a variety of protein-rich foods. Here are some high protein vegan foods to include in your diet: tofu, seitan,veggie burgers, soy, lentils, chickpeas, nuts and seeds, brown rice and whole grains.

  • Tempeh -  41 g per cup
  • Lentils – 18 g per cup
  • Plain soymilk – 11 g per cup
  • Edamame – 20 g per cup
  • Seitan – 19 g per 3 ounces
  • Tofu – 20 g per ½ cup
  • Peas – 9 g per cup
  • Brown rice – 5 g per cup
  • White rice – 4 g per cup
  • Cooked broccoli – 4 g per cup
  • Sunflower seeds – 6 g per ¼ cup
  • Quinoa – 9 g per cup
  • Cooked spinach – 5 g per cup
  • Avocado – 4 g per cup
  • Whole grain bread – 7 g in 2 slices
  • Black beans – 15 g per cup
  • Cashews – 5 g per ¼ cup
  • Cooked semolina pasta – 8 g per cup
  • Chia seeds – 5 g per 2 tablespoons
  • Flax seeds – 4 g per 2 tablespoons
  • Bulgur – 5.5 g per cup
  • Peanut butter – 8 g per 2 tablespoons
  • Sunflower seed butter – 5.5 g per 2 tablespoons
  • Baked red potato – 3 g per cup

USDA Nutrition Database

independent-life  asked:

Hi! What are the easiest ways to get protein? Ever since I stopped eating meat I'm worried I'm not getting enough protein.. Thank you!

Hey there independent-life!

The little known truth about protein is that most of us get too much, not too little of it. Women need about 45 grams per day and men need around 55 grams. One cup of tofu contains about 20 grams of protein, so women, eat some tofu and you’re almost halfway there! Lots of foods contain protein and if you’re eating a well-balanced diet, you’re probably consuming more than enough protein without even thinking about it. Even though it’s quite easy to get plenty of protein on a vegan diet, its a good idea to make sure you’re eating a variety of protein-rich foods. Here are some high protein vegan foods to include in your diet: tofu, seitan,veggie burgers, soy, lentils, chickpeas, nuts and seeds, brown rice and whole grains.

  • Tempeh -  41 g per cup
  • Lentils – 18 g per cup
  • Plain soymilk – 11 g per cup
  • Edamame – 20 g per cup
  • Seitan – 19 g per 3 ounces
  • Tofu – 20 g per ½ cup
  • Peas – 9 g per cup
  • Brown rice – 5 g per cup
  • White rice – 4 g per cup
  • Cooked broccoli – 4 g per cup
  • Sunflower seeds – 6 g per ¼ cup
  • Quinoa – 9 g per cup
  • Cooked spinach – 5 g per cup
  • Avocado – 4 g per cup
  • Whole grain bread – 7 g in 2 slices
  • Black beans – 15 g per cup
  • Cashews – 5 g per ¼ cup
  • Cooked semolina pasta – 8 g per cup
  • Chia seeds – 5 g per 2 tablespoons
  • Flax seeds – 4 g per 2 tablespoons
  • Bulgur – 5.5 g per cup
  • Peanut butter – 8 g per 2 tablespoons
  • Sunflower seed butter – 5.5 g per 2 tablespoons
  • Baked red potato – 3 g per cup

USDA Nutrition Database

fitgirl2234  asked:

Ok so I've been pescetarian for about 6 months now and I haven't touched red meat in over a year. I really want to go full vegan, but the problem is I'm a serious athlete and I don't want my performance to be affected by lack of protein. Is there a way I can go vegan and still get enough protein, even traveling at tournaments or on the road?

Hi! If you plan well your intake as I suppose you do know, there is nothing to worry about when it comes to protein:

Protein: 

The little known truth about protein is that most of us get too much, not too little of it. Women need about 45 grams per day and men need around 55 grams. One cup of tofu contains about 20 grams of protein, so women, eat some tofu and you’re almost halfway there! Lots of foods contain protein and if you’re eating a well-balanced diet, you’re probably consuming more than enough protein without even thinking about it. Even though it’s quite easy to get plenty of protein on a vegan diet, its a good idea to make sure you’re eating a variety of protein-rich foods. Here are some high protein vegan foods to include in your diet: tofu, seitan,veggie burgers, soy, lentils, chickpeas, nuts and seeds, brown rice and whole grains.

  • Tempeh -  41 g per cup
  • Lentils – 18 g per cup
  • Plain soymilk – 11 g per cup
  • Edamame – 20 g per cup
  • Seitan – 19 g per 3 ounces
  • Tofu – 20 g per ½ cup
  • Peas – 9 g per cup
  • Brown rice – 5 g per cup
  • White rice – 4 g per cup
  • Cooked broccoli – 4 g per cup
  • Sunflower seeds – 6 g per ¼ cup
  • Quinoa – 9 g per cup
  • Cooked spinach – 5 g per cup
  • Avocado – 4 g per cup
  • Whole grain bread – 7 g in 2 slices
  • Black beans – 15 g per cup
  • Cashews – 5 g per ¼ cup
  • Cooked semolina pasta – 8 g per cup
  • Chia seeds – 5 g per 2 tablespoons
  • Flax seeds – 4 g per 2 tablespoons
  • Bulgur – 5.5 g per cup
  • Peanut butter – 8 g per 2 tablespoons
  • Sunflower seed butter – 5.5 g per 2 tablespoons
  • Baked red potato – 3 g per cup

USDA Nutrition Database

I recommend you to take a look at No Meat Athlete and Great Vegan Athletes too. Fueling the Vegetarian (Vegan) Athlete.

anonymous asked:

I feel so guilty when i eat meat, but i need to in order to maintain a healthy weight and enough iron in my body. :( any advice?

Hi there! Don’t let the myths prevent you for going vegan.

Protein: 

The little known truth about protein is that most of us get too much, not too little of it. Women need about 45 grams per day and men need around 55 grams. One cup of tofu contains about 20 grams of protein, so women, eat some tofu and you’re almost halfway there! Lots of foods contain protein and if you’re eating a well-balanced diet, you’re probably consuming more than enough protein without even thinking about it. Even though it’s quite easy to get plenty of protein on a vegan diet, its a good idea to make sure you’re eating a variety of protein-rich foods. Here are some high protein vegan foods to include in your diet: tofu, seitan,veggie burgers, soy, lentils, chickpeas, nuts and seeds, brown rice and whole grains.

  • Tempeh -  41 g per cup
  • Lentils – 18 g per cup
  • Plain soymilk – 11 g per cup
  • Edamame – 20 g per cup
  • Seitan – 19 g per 3 ounces
  • Tofu – 20 g per ½ cup
  • Peas – 9 g per cup
  • Brown rice – 5 g per cup
  • White rice – 4 g per cup
  • Cooked broccoli – 4 g per cup
  • Sunflower seeds – 6 g per ¼ cup
  • Quinoa – 9 g per cup
  • Cooked spinach – 5 g per cup
  • Avocado – 4 g per cup
  • Whole grain bread – 7 g in 2 slices
  • Black beans – 15 g per cup
  • Cashews – 5 g per ¼ cup
  • Cooked semolina pasta – 8 g per cup
  • Chia seeds – 5 g per 2 tablespoons
  • Flax seeds – 4 g per 2 tablespoons
  • Bulgur – 5.5 g per cup
  • Peanut butter – 8 g per 2 tablespoons
  • Sunflower seed butter – 5.5 g per 2 tablespoons
  • Baked red potato – 3 g per cup

Iron:

A study published in the British Journal of Nutrition found that iron levels in vegans in the UK were, on average, higher than those of the general population, showing that it’s possible to get more than enough iron on a vegan diet. Just like with protein, however, you should still be sure to eat a balanced diet to ensure you are getting enough iron. Drinking coffee and tea, particularly with meals, can limit your absorption and should be consumed at least three hours before a meal. For an iron boost, try eating tofu, lentils, spinach, soy, chickpeas and hummus. Vitamin C also increases the absorption of iron, so if you take an iron supplement, wash it down with some orange juice!

  • Green leafy vegetables & sea vegetables
  • Legumes/beans
  • Nuts & seeds
  • Dried fruits
  • Watermelon
  • Prune juice
  • Spinach
  • Cereals
  • whole grains.

USDA Nutrition Database

universewiththeadventure  asked:

Okay so I've been vegetarian for almost 6 months and my parents are okay with me being vegetarian they just fear that I won't get enough protein. Also, I really want to become vegan but my parents do not approve of that. They say I'm only 13 and need the milk. Do you have some pointers to help me pursuance them. Bonus question: how can I incorporate more vegan culture into my family of meat and dairy eaters??

Hello!

Protein:

The little known truth about protein is that most of us get too much, not too little of it. Women need about 45 grams per day and men need around 55 grams. One cup of tofu contains about 20 grams of protein, so women, eat some tofu and you’re almost halfway there! Lots of foods contain protein and if you’re eating a well-balanced diet, you’re probably consuming more than enough protein without even thinking about it. Even though it’s quite easy to get plenty of protein on a vegan diet, its a good idea to make sure you’re eating a variety of protein-rich foods. Here are some high protein vegan foods to include in your diet: tofu, seitan,veggie burgers, soy, lentils, chickpeas, nuts and seeds, brown rice and whole grains.

  • Tempeh -  41 g per cup
  • Lentils – 18 g per cup
  • Plain soymilk – 11 g per cup
  • Edamame – 20 g per cup
  • Seitan – 19 g per 3 ounces
  • Tofu – 20 g per ½ cup
  • Peas – 9 g per cup
  • Brown rice – 5 g per cup
  • White rice – 4 g per cup
  • Cooked broccoli – 4 g per cup
  • Sunflower seeds – 6 g per ¼ cup
  • Quinoa – 9 g per cup
  • Cooked spinach – 5 g per cup
  • Avocado – 4 g per cup
  • Whole grain bread – 7 g in 2 slices
  • Black beans – 15 g per cup
  • Cashews – 5 g per ¼ cup
  • Cooked semolina pasta – 8 g per cup
  • Chia seeds – 5 g per 2 tablespoons
  • Flax seeds – 4 g per 2 tablespoons
  • Bulgur – 5.5 g per cup
  • Peanut butter – 8 g per 2 tablespoons
  • Sunflower seed butter – 5.5 g per 2 tablespoons
  • Baked red potato – 3 g per cup

USDA Nutrition Database

About milk:

The Harvard School of Public Health sent a strong message to the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) and nutrition experts everywhere with the recent release of its “Healthy Eating Plate” food guide.  The university was responding to the USDA’s new MyPlate guide for healthy eating, which replaced the outdated and misguided food pyramid.

Keep reading