segregated-school

How The Systemic Segregation Of Schools Is Maintained By ‘Individual Choices’

Sixty-three years after the Supreme Court’s Brown v. Board of Education ruling mandated the desegregation of American schools, many schools across the country either remain segregated or have re-segregated.

Journalist Nikole Hannah-Jones tells Fresh Air’s Terry Gross that when it comes to school segregation, separate is never truly equal.

“There’s never been a moment in the history of this country where black people who have been isolated from white people have gotten the same resources,” Hannah-Jones says. “They often don’t have the same level of instruction. They often don’t have strong principals. They often don’t have the same technology.”

Still, when it was time for Hannah-Jones’ daughter, Najya, to attend kindergarten, the journalist chose the public school near their home in Bedford-Stuyvesant, Brooklyn, even though its students were almost all poor and black or Latino. Hannah-Jones later wrote about that decision in The New York Times Magazine.

For Hannah-Jones, sending Najya to the neighborhood school was a moral issue. “It is important to understand that the inequality we see, school segregation, is both structural, it is systemic, but it’s also upheld by individual choices,” she says. “As long as individual parents continue to make choices that only benefit their own children … we’re not going to see a change.”

Hannah-Jones adds that her daughter is thriving at school. “I know she’s learning a lot,” she says. “I think it is making her a good citizen. … It is teaching her that children who have less resources than her are not any less intelligent than her or not any less worthy than her.”

Illustration: Michelle Kondrich for NPR

Sixty-three years after the Supreme Court’s ruling in Brown v. Board of Education, many schools across the country either remain segregated or have re-segregated.

Journalist Nikole Hannah-Jones tells Fresh Air’s Terry Gross that when it comes to school segregation, separate is never truly equal.

“There’s never been a moment in the history of this country where black people who have been isolated from white people have gotten the same resources,” Hannah-Jones says. “They often don’t have the same level of instruction. They often don’t have strong principals. They often don’t have the same technology.”

Still, when it was time for Hannah-Jones’ daughter, Najya, to attend kindergarten, the journalist chose the public school near their home in Bedford-Stuyvesant, Brooklyn, even though its students were almost all poor and black or Latino. Hannah-Jones later wrote about that decision in The New York Times Magazine.

For Hannah-Jones, sending Najya to the neighborhood school was a moral issue. “It is important to understand that the inequality we see, school segregation, is both structural, it is systemic, but it’s also upheld by individual choices,” she says. “As long as individual parents continue to make choices that only benefit their own children … we’re not going to see a change.”

How The Systemic Segregation Of Schools Is Maintained By ‘Individual Choices’

Illustration: LA Johnson/NPR

Okay but for real though

I wanna see more headcanons/fics about Hazel adjusting to the 21st century. Not so much in the technology aspect but in the social aspect. Keep in mind she lived in the 1940s. BEFORE THE CIVIL RIGHTS MOVEMENT. Like we know she had to go to a segregated school and everything, but we never get to see her reaction to how times have changed. For example:

  • Hazel asking where the bathrooms for colored people are and Nico having to explain that they aren’t segregated anymore
  • Hazel being surprised at how nice Percy and Jason are to her because in her time white boys generally didn’t acknowledge black girls. Especially not politely. 
  • The Seven stopping at a restaurant to get something to eat and Hazel being reluctant to go through the front door. At first, everyone is confused but then Annabeth catches on and assures Hazel that the restaurant won’t refuse to serve her
  • Hazel finding out about America’s first African American President and FLIPPING OUT
  • Frank showing her MLK’s “I Have a Dream” speech and Hazel tearing up at it

LIKE SERIOUSLY I WANT THESE ISSUES ADDRESSED

The Clark Doll Test was created by Dr. Kenneth Clark and his wife, Marmie Clark. It focused on stereotypes and self perception in relation to race. Clark wanted to show that segregation in schools was misconstruing the mind of young African American children and causing them to internalise racism and view themselves as lesser. In the test, African American children ranging from 6-years-old to 9-years-old were shown two dolls - one was white and one was black. They were asked a number of questions such as:  Show me the doll that you like best or that you would like to play with. Show me the doll that is the ‘nice’ doll. Show me the doll that looks 'bad.’ Give me the doll that looks like a white child. Give me the doll that looks like a coloured child. Give me the doll that looks like a Negro child. Give me the doll that looks like you. The test showed that the children preferred to play with with white doll as opposed to the black doll. The children were then asked to colour in a human figure with the colour of their own skin - the majority chose a lighter shade. As well as this, the children gave the white doll positive attributes such as “good” and “pretty” while describing the black doll as “bad” and “ugly”. 44% of the children said that the white doll looked like them as opposed to the black doll. This test indicated that African American children, even as young as just 6-years-old, suffered internalised racism due to segregation. The findings paved the way for an increase in psychological research into areas of self-esteem and self-concept.

“Bessie Coleman (Jan. 26, 1892 – Apr. 30, 1926) was an American civil aviator. She was the first woman of African American descent, and the first of Native American descent, to hold a pilot license. She achieved her international pilot license in 1921. Born to a family of sharecroppers in Texas, she went into the cotton fields at a young age but also studied in a small segregated school and went on to attend one term of college at Langston University. 

She developed an early interest in flying, but because neither African Americans, nor women had flight school opportunities in the United States, she saved up money to go to France to become a licensed pilot. She soon became a successful air show pilot in the United States, and hoped to start a school for African American fliers. She died in a plane crash in 1926 while testing a new aircraft. Her pioneering role was an inspiration to early pilots and to the African American community.”

Read more here

It baffles me

That you have to specify that you’re anti-shoplifting. That you have to explain to people why stealing is wrong.

That there are people really trying to justify pedophilia.

That people believe looting is justified if you’re angry. That black people, looting and burning down black owned businesses is justified as “protesting”.

That as adults in college people want to be coddled and treated like babies. That women want to feel oppressed by finding any reason to relinquish their responsibilities and blame the patriarchy.

That there are people who want segregated schools, classrooms, dorms. That they honestly believe that when white people did it, it was wrong, but when it parades under the guise of “giving minorities space” it’s suddenly alright.

That social justice has made it so far into our societies, threatening our rights and freedoms. That there are people out there actively fighting for censorship and the limitation of our freedom of speech.

That there are people changing the genders of their children as early as age 4.

That you could lose your job for simply saying “there are only two genders” or “I believe in innocent until proven guilty”.

It baffles me that this is happening, and sometimes I feel helpless to stop this.

anonymous asked:

I have a large family, several aunts and uncles (and corresponding cousins) on both sides. And I just learned that the only trump support of the bunch is also the only one of the bunch who went to segregated schools. Coincidence? BEING AROUND PEOPLE WHO ARE DIFFERENT FROM YOU MAKES YOU LESS OF AN ASSHOLE.

Less likely, at least.

More than any nominee for attorney general in modern American history, Sessions would be an unapologetic defender of the old Confederacy and has refused to criticize policies that stem directly from Jim Crow. For example, Alabama’s 1901 Constitution still includes language authorizing a poll tax and segregated schools. Referendums to remove such language—which Sessions failed to support—were defeated by voters in 2004 and 2012. Interracial marriage was illegal in the state until 2000. When Sessions was state attorney general, there were still officially segregated proms in the state.
—   Jeff Sessions Could Return Criminal Justice to the Jim Crow Era
flickr

Mixed Messages by Monica Talbot
Via Flickr:
Full Disclosure: This is another political message, but one less vitriolic and more contemplative than my recent ones. But if this bothers you, feel free to skip the text below. 

Trump’s election brings a tremendous amount of uncertainty to all Americans since no one’s sure how much of what he said in his campaign will translate to what he does in office. I don’t think he gave it much thought either, because he probably thought he’d lose. Transgender rights and the way transgender people are treated in society is near and dear to my heart. Admittedly a minor issue to most people, but a biggie for me.  

On the one hand, Trump has said supportive things, like transgender people should be able to use whatever bathroom they wish. On the other hand, VP Mike Pence recently said both Trump and he agree that bathroom/gender issues should be a local concern, not a federal one. 

 Well, that’s very similar to school segregation. Back in the 1950s, northern schools were largely desegregated and southern ones were largely segregated. President Eisenhower changed that in 1957 by ordering federal marshals to Little Rock, Arkansas to ensure black students could go to desegregated schools after the ‘Brown v Board of Education’ decision in the Supreme Court. Eisenhower knew he had to make desegregation a federal concern, not just a local issue. (I’m not so partisan that I don’t acknowledge Republicans doing the right thing). 

 Can you imagine what our nation would be like if civil rights was just a local or state issue, not a federal one? It would be 'Jim Crow’ throughout many places in America. 

 Meanwhile, the latest FBI hate crime data shows a spike in assaults against transgender people, along with a big spike in hate crimes against Muslims. It’s likely the anti-Muslim sentiment is motivated by Trump supporters, but less obvious they are responsible for transgender assaults. This is because many assaults against transgenders are committed by Blacks against Blacks or Latinos against Latinas, and neither group supported Trump at significant levels. But it is troubling, possibly an indication of less overall compassion for others in our nation. And the anti-Muslim hate crime spike is horrific – this has no place in America. 

 So what’s my prognosis? 

 - Don’t expect any meaningful progress on transgender rights from Trump. Anticipate some 'back sliding’ by de-emphasizing or not funding anything Obama did for the cause. 

 - Expect more local & state initiatives against transgender people along the lines that North Carolina did. Don’t expect anything else than 'leave it to local government’ rhetoric from Trump. 

 - Expect an arch conservative Supreme Court nominee which will virtually guarantee any meaningful transgender rights cases will be decided against us, or not even heard. 

 - Anticipate that more transgender people will have to move to friendlier places in order to live safely and with peace of mind. Easier to do as an adult with means. Tough as hell for many young and/or poor people. 

 Ultimately, I think things will get better, just as they have for all minorities. But there will be eras of progress and regress, and this will probably be a four-year setback. Try to draw some comfort from Martin Luther King’s famous quote: 'The arc of the moral universe is long, but it bends towards justice.’

What do you call an emo during fall?

A punkin

“Special education” is neither special nor education.