seek and speak

6

emeraude talking about how the writers room handles different sexualities (x)

listen but like…. imagine allura staying up at night, restless and unable to think clearly even for just a moment so she stays out on the bridge to look at the stars and eventually hunk notices and eventually starts joining her. some nights they talk for hours and others they just sit in quiet, but it becomes their thing for just the two of them

The Music of "When You Believe"

One of the most powerful songs I ever have heard comes from “The Prince of Egypt”. It has brought me to tears on far more than one occasion (such as now, oops), and no matter how often I listen to it, the song maintains an incredible force that makes it, to my eyes as a working music composer myself, one of the greatest songs throughout animation.

The strength of this song comes from the combination of well-written lyrics plus the musical choices accompanying those lyrics. The composers (Stephen Schwartz and Hans Zimmer) very intentionally, very successfully aligned the deep emotions of the words with equally powerful music. By exploiting the effects of instrumentation, the shape of the melody line, musical key, and the lyrics, listeners are taken through a deep, emotion-wrought narrative of the Hebrews beginning the Exodus.

In Darkness

The start of “When You Believe” is very dark, moaning deep in the cellos and other low voices of the orchestra. For indeed, while Moses has just learned the Hebrews have been freed of their slavery from Egypt, it comes at an enormous price: the death of many Egyptians including his nephew, as well as a break in the bond between himself and his brother. There thus is a darkness to the music and the animation on the screen to match that dark event which is occurring in Moses’ life.

But even when Miriam begins to sing, the cityscape is still dark and the music retains its rich, dark ambiance. The instrumentation is mostly strings, especially the lower to mid-range. All is thick and solemn. On top of that, the melody is within the minor mode, a musical scale that is known for sounding more somber and sad than the major scale. This use of minor adds a weight and sadness to her words, continuing on that sense of darkness.

There’s a symbolic reason to cast that sense of aural shadow. Miriam’s words in the first verse sing of a darkness, too, within the Hebrews’ lives. “Many nights we prayed, with no proof anyone could hear,” she begins. There is a sense of hopelessness and darkness in her words, and the music likewise provides the sense that the lives of the slaves were cast in psychological powerlessness. The melody even drifts downward over the first line of the verse, the pitches descending with the line, metaphorically depicting downcast spirits.

If the music had been brighter and more upbeat, it would have emphasized the fact the Hebrews prayed vigilantly; however, with the deep strings and minor descending melody, audiences understand the oppressive hopelessness that crushed the peoples’ existence.

There are only slight hints of hope in the within the first verse, especially at the start. The first twinkle of hope within the darkness comes in the second line, “In our hearts a hopeful song we barely understood." 

Notice that the music rises before sinking downward again. The words peak on the word "hopeful,” in fact, with a dramatic leap up to the final syllable. There’s a sound of a song in that peaking interval (a fourth) which is associated with many types of folk musics from around the world, and that jump upward is a notable spark of hope to the ears. The song might still be cast in a dark minor melody, and that “hopeful song” might fall again to lower musical pitches in the rest of the musical line, but that little spark nonetheless is very aurally noticeable and depicts that little spark the Hebrews clung to themselves.

Increasing Brightness

There is an increasing brightness as the verse continues. It aligns with the growing hope in the lyrics as well as the brightening colors animated on the screen. The third line of the melody is the same as the first, but it’s orchestrated differently. The clarinet and the flute enter, warming up the texture of the music in the accompaniment, corresponding to the much more optimistic lyric, “Now we are not afraid.” This time, when the pitches fall at the end of the line, “even though there’s much to fear,” it gives a sense of determination rather than hopelessness.

And then the fourth and final line of the verse pulls forward an even greater transformation.

We have another symbolic rise - through a technique called “text painting” - in which the word “mountains” is musically described through the upward jump of pitches. The word “mountains” is a peak in the musical line, just as a mountain is a peak in the landscape. Corresponding visually, the viewers see pyramids and other grand Egyptian structures. These might not be mountains, but the enormity of those monuments is indeed something incredible to move. Suddenly, then, the Hebrews’ lives of slavery are not just torment and despair, but a demonstration of the strength of the people.

And look above at that final note in the verse. It moves upward, leading to the chorus, and showing an enormous growth of hope.

There Can be Miracles

Suddenly, there is sunrise. And Miriam is smiling. And people are coming together. And hope blossoms. And the music in the chorus sings it all: “There can be miracles when you believe. Though hope is frail, it’s hard to kill. Who knows what miracles you can achieve? When you believe, somehow you will. You will when you believe.”

The song changes keys to equate that shift in mood. The verse is in e minor, a very dark key orchestrationally that makes the music sound incredibly weighty and somber and allows composers to frequently use some of the lowest pitches the instruments can play. But then this song shifts to G major in the chorus. This is one of the brightest keys an orchestra can play (There are lots of “open strings” in this key, meaning that the strings in the violins, violas, cellos, and basses reverberate a lot more and sound very bright and rich). G major and e minor all use the same pitches, but to very different effects. In the same way, there is a shift from the content of the verse to the chorus, even though the material Miriam discusses is similar. It is a shift from unactualized hope to the experience of a miracle. And thus a shift from darkness to lightness occurs both within her words, within the sunrise of the animation, and within the change of mood in the music.  

The melody itself is very hopeful. Every single line of the melody, beginning with, “There can be miracles,” moves upward. The pitches always rise from start to end, showing enormous optimism.

Text painting also happens again; that is, the music shapes itself in ways to symbolically correlate to the meaning of the lyrics. The word “miracles” has an enormous rise in it, just like the words “hopeful” and “mountains." 

The word "believe” similarly receives a climactic high pitch, showing its greatness and importance.

The word “frail,” by contrast, is sung with an enormous drop downward in pitch, aurally creating a sense of weakness.

Even when the syllables occur in the music is very well placed and gives a sense of optimism and determination.

There is a sense of pulse in music. Some pulses are a lot heavier than others, and these are called “downbeats.” If you look at the pictures of musical notation I have, the “downbeats” happen with the first and third black notes of every measure (a measure is a chunk of music that is separated by those vertical lines). Every time you hit a downbeat, then, there is a sense of more power. And notice what words hit the downbeats in this music. Words like “can” and “hope”. In the line, “it’s hard to kill,” both “hard” and “kill” receive the musical metrical emphasis. What does this do? It emphasizes the greatest of what happened, shows that miracles can and in fact just have happened. It brings confidence to the lyrics.

The dotted rhythms create even more confidence within the melody line.

Altogether, then, the entirety of the chorus screams hope.

Continuation of Narrative

The second verse returns to the dark minor key that audiences heard in the first verse. Zipporah is speaking of the Hebrews’ experience of slavery in the lyrical narrative, thus requiring a thicker atmosphere to the music. We hear a little bit of song again in the rise of pitch with the words “summer bird,” as well as that fall of hope when subsequently she sings “too swiftly flown away.”

Paralleling the first verse, a similar growth from dark to light again occurs with the lyrics and the music in the second verse. And thus we move from despair to cheer as she sings: “In this time of fear, when prayer so often proves in vain hope seems like the summer birds, too swiftly flown away. Yet now I’m standing here, my heart so full I can’t explain, seeking faith and speaking words I’d never thought I’d say.” When Miriam adds a duet, a further sense of hope grows, for the people are coming together to begin the Exodus, traveling to freedom.

The second chorus is even musically bigger than the first, the visuals brighter, the hope more powerful. We see the Exodus happening now. There are people leaving. The miracle is here, it is happening, and the growth of music augments that.

The Children’s Song

Children begin singing, showing such a sense of hope as can be equaled by nothing else. The Bible indeed speaks of a child’s faith being great - not to mention the association with children is very positive and bright. The music is still in happy G major, though it also uses some pitches like C natural that never have been used before, making the music sound even brighter. The melody dances, and so do the people.

It is even more powerful when you know what the kids are saying.

It is part of a poem actually in the Bible seen in Exodus 15: 1, 11, and 13. Not only are these Hebrew lyrics actually in the Bible, but they are recorded as the song that Miriam and Aaron themselves sang when they were leaving Egypt. This is the song, guys! The legitimate words they sang in this event.

אָשִׁירָה לַה’ כִּי-גָאֹה גָּאָה 
מִי כָמֹכָה בָּאֵלִם ה’ מִי כָּמֹכָה נֶאְדָּר בַּקֹּדֶשׁ 
נָחִיתָ בְחַסְדְּךָ עַם-זוּ גָּאָלְתָּ 

Ashira laadonay ki gao gaa 
Ashira laadonay ki gao gaa
Mi chamocha baelim adonay
Mi kamocha needar bakodesh 
Nakhita vekhasdecha am zu gaalta 
Nakhita vekhasdecha am zu gaalta 
Ashira ashira ashira

So that’s all well and good to see the text in another language, but what does it mean in English?

Check it out:

I will sing unto the Lord, for He is highly exalted 
Who is like unto Thee, O Lord, among the mighty? who is like unto Thee, glorious in holiness 
Thou in Thy love hast led the people that Thou hast redeemed

In another translation that sounds a bit less archaic:

I will sing to the Lord, for he is highly exalted.
Who among the gods is like you, O Lord?
Who is like you - majestic in holiness?
In your unfailing love you will lead the people you have redeemed.

This song is one of being saved by God and thanking him for the miracle. And the music expands and everyone begins singing and an almost giddy happiness results when the song spins faster and faster.

The Power of Belief

The final chorus explodes in full choir. It is the voice now of the entire Hebrew people belting out faith and awe at what has happened. Not only that, but the music rises in pitch, bursting to A major. The music reaches an all-time dramatic high in terms of sheer force of musicians playing in singing, in terms of the highest pitches sung, and in terms of volume. 

The music climaxes in power - to the full power of belief. To the full glory of this miracle. What has happened has just changed millions of lives. Millions of lives are free and singing praise.

It is hard to believe now that the song began in such a dark corner, sounding so futile and depressed and hopeless. But through the incredible narration of sound and lyrics, everyone by the end of the song understand - understands full well - “There can be miracles when you believe.”

If one more person tells me that being trans isn’t a medical disorder I swear to god.

If being trans is no longer recognized as a medical issue by the government then I get a one way ticket to Pay-For-All-My-Surgeries-Myself-With-No-Help-From-Insurance-Because-It’ll-Be-Deemed-As-Cosmetic-ville. Don’t kid yourself that I’ll still be covered if its demedicalized.

(And I’m lucky to even have insurance that covers my trans related expenses - thanks Janice Raymond, Paul Mchugh, and miscellaneous 1980s Trans Hating Radical Femmunists™ that lead to trans people losing their insurance coverage for decades.)

Gender dysphoria, which is what you have when you’re trans, causes you enough stress to the point that you need to seek medical intervention, generally speaking. Which means that it is a medical issue.

Spouting off the rhetoric that being trans isn’t a medical disorder for the sake of “ending stigma” does nothing and actually adversely effects trans people who are relying on insurance to cover their life saving surgeries and hormonal treatment. Example: Phalloplasty costs anywhere from $30k-$100k depending on the surgeon and what country its done in. In the US you’ll probably be looking at the $100k mark. I’d rather not pay for that out of pocket.

I get that you mean well but really you’re just showing your ignorance on an issue that you should not be weighing in on.

And I don’t mean that as “no non-trans person should have an opinion on trans issues” because 1. plenty of non-trans people are well versed on the complex issues we face and are probably better equipped to address said issues than a lot of trans people and 2. this message is also directed at trans people.

did yall see on jareds instagram that tom’s nails were painted?? that makes me like. so immeasurably happy

i KNEW the padaleckis werent the people to keep a traditional and strictly gendered house i love it

like esp after gen tweeted multiple times abt protecting trans kids and how she was at the womens march in austin i just

i know jared cant tweet “political” things because hes under contract but hes said so many sweet things about lgbt sam fans at cons and im just over the moon that his whole family is accepting and progressive and im happy his kids will be able to grow up with safety and equality and love no matter who they turn out to be

mirror.co.uk
Gran suffered heart attack at job centre meeting - but was too scared to leave
The incident echoes the hit Ken Loach film I, Daniel Blake, where the lead actor suffers a heart attack on the way to a job centre meeting and dies
By Adam Aspinall

“At the time of her heart attack (and Jobcentre appointment), she was working in a chip shop and was in receipt of JSA and housing benefit. ….

The DWP (Department for Work and Pensions) said: “We would always encourage claimants who suddenly fall ill to seek medical attention, or to speak to a member of staff for assistance.” ….

However: "I was feeling some really bad pains in my chest and I told her (the Jobcentre Adviser) at least two or three times that I was in agony, but she was just so callous, she just kept ignoring me. “I said I needed to go to the NHS walk-in centre immediately, but it fell on deaf ears. I was living in fear of being sanctioned and just felt trapped. I didn’t think I could leave or I would be sanctioned.” Salena was forced to endure a 40-minute JSA interview, while sweating profusely and suffering chest pains. As soon as she left the interview, she went to a nearby NHS walk-in centre, where medics immediately called an ambulance and took her to hospital. Blood tests revealed she had suffered a heart attack and surgeons inserted two stents into her arteries.”

“Last year, the The National Audit Office launched a scathing attack on the benefit sanctions system, saying fining people for breaking the terms of benefits does more harm than good and costs more to enforce than it saves.

It said withholding benefits, which is commonplace, plunges claimants into hardship, hunger and depression.

Dr Wanda Wyporska, director of The Equality Trust, said: “It’s disgusting to see how some of the most vulnerable people in society are treated.

“Our social security system is being slowly eroded and further cuts will see the poorest families hit even harder.””

The fact that Kid Cudi felt he had to apologise about going through depression and seeking help speaks volumes about the way we view mental health.

Kid Cudi was a voice for a lot of us growing up and to see him like this breaks my heart. I really wish him speedy recovery, I also hope his thoughts don’t eat him up.

4

In a humourous bit of irony, antifa (some from as far away as atlanta) seeking to disrupt a speaking engagement by Richard Spencer, were forced by police to demask according to anti-KKK laws. Subsequently, many quietly shuffled away once their anonymity were taken away.

Unsurprisingly, left wing punditry on social media blame police upholding fascist laws to defend fascists.
It burns, doesn’t it? [Prologue]

Genre: Mafia!au I Mature I Fluff? Angst…so much angst I Violence and all that good mafia stuff.

Members: Jungkook x Yoongi x Namjoon x Jin  x Hoseok x Jimin x Taehyung  Feat. Got7 

SummaryWhy am I hurting alone? Why am I in love alone?

Originally posted by berry852

I Prologue  1   2  I  3  I  4  I  5  I  6  I  7  I  8  I  9  I


You heard police and paramedics say it was a hit and run. There were others who were injured in the accident but your father was in the worse condition. 

“Dad…please, you can’t-’

‘I love you, ok? Take care of your aunt for me…tell your brother I’m-’ 

 You sobbed vigorously as police had forcefully pried you away from your father’s now lifeless form.

Keep reading

Sometimes I’ll come up with random equations then solve for the derivative. It’s honestly A LOT of fun especially when I’m waiting somewhere. 

For the first 3 years after initially learning calculus I’d come up with something that had a bunch of sin/cos/tan and log and e functions and whatnot and just keep going down to figure out the 2nd/3rd/4th derivatives. 

So, this is going to sound like highkey projecting and sue me if it is BUT

I do headcanon that Ford has done the same throughout all his life. Progressing from long division when he was really small and up to high level physics and theory-based equations throughout and well past college. 

This habit was probably especially big during his college years when he’d be in a class that was so easy for him that he’d get bored and end up just littering his notes with tons of equations and drawings. 

Featured above: Some in-canon support. Check out that page there. Doodles AND seriously complicated equations. 

Which, even for a highly advanced child, that’s not homework that would ever be assigned to him at that age. Brief personal experience mention in tags if you don’t trust me on that.

Granted, the creators could have put those equations to paint Ford as a genius child (while still intending it to be his classwork), but they could have easily put down Calc work which would have been at least semi-believable homework assigned to him. 

Also considering that a generic high school course doesn’t require calculus classes, it would have achieved the same effect for most people watching the show. The assumed effect being ‘holy moses he was SUCH a smart nerd child.’