security protections

anonymous asked:

This whole net neutrality thing is confusing me. Are people arguing that ISPs shouldn't be able to censor the internet because that's the government's job?

The short version of it is this:

  • ISPs are slowing/denying service to particular traffic (torrent clients get throttled, Comcast slows Netflix connections unless Netflix pays up, etc)
  • FCC says that they can’t do that
  • Appeals courts and lawsuits say FCC acted out of the bounds of current law due to various factors. Most importantly, broadband providers being classified as Title 1 information providers instead of Title 2 common carriers. This justification in the Verizon lawsuit is what struck down 2/3rds of the 2010 FCC Open Internet Order.
  • FCC ultimately reclassifies ISPs during the Obama administration under Title 2 of the Communications Act of 1934, as this gives them more secure legal ground to protect/enforce net neutrality than the legal framework they previously relied on (Section 706 of the Telecommunications Act of 1996)
  • FCC stated they’ll apply Title 2 selectively to ISPs, basically only using the parts of the law that are actually relevant to broadband internet
  • Trump administration rolls around
  • Ajit Pai, who was previously Associate General Counsel for Verizon and voted against the Title 2 reclassification, becomes chairman of the FCC
  • Ajit immediately vows to roll back the FCC policies, citing a statistically minuscule drop in capital expenditures as proof that the protections are harming the industry

Basically ISPs were being exploitative, FCC told them they can’t be exploitative, Appeals courts and lawsuits said the FCC technically doesn’t have the legal grounds to say ISPs can’t be exploitative due to their current classification, FCC reclassifies ISPs so they now have the legal grounds to say they can’t be exploitative, and now Ajit wants to roll back the legislation to allow ISPs to be exploitative again on the flimsy unsubstantiated grounds that the legislation somehow stifles competition and market growth.

MÉXICO NEEDS YOUR HELP

Chiapas’ earthquake

As some of you might know, last night, around 23:50 h, one of the most powerful earthquakes ever recorded in Mexico struck off the country’s southern coast. The earthquake hit off Chiapas state near the Guatemalan border with a 8.2 magnitude. It was slightly stronger than the 1985 quake, that destroyed Mexico City.

President Enrique Peña Nieto stated that at least 31 people were killed and over 200 were injured due the quake. Many people in Chiapas and Oaxaca have lost their homes. Both states have declared STATE OF EMERGENCY.

The effects were also felt in Guatemala, where at least one person died and homes along the border with Mexico were leveled

So far, 266 aftershocks have been registered. The last one happened today at 6:28 h, with a 6.1 magnitude.

Most affected towns in Oaxaca: Juchitán, Matías Romero, Unión Hidalgo, San Dionisio del Mar, Asunción Ixtaltepec, Santa María Xadani, Santiago Niltepec, Santo Domingo, Ingenio, El Espinal, Tehuantepec, Salina Cruz and other communities.

Juchitan’s city councilor, Pamela Terán, asked the state and federal authorities for help.“We urgently need as much help as you can send,” she said. “We need hands and manpower to try and dig out the people that we know are buried under the rubble.”

Schools in at least 10 Mexican states and in Mexico City were closed on Friday as the president ordered an immediate assessment of the damage nationwide. 

TSUNAMI ALERT in Oaxaca has been cancelled, and REDIRECTED to Guerrero.

Katia in Veracruz

Katia is now a category 2 hurricane and will land on Veracruz coast tonight.

Said state and Tampico, Tamaulipas are now under constant vigilance.

Intense storms are expected in Puebla, Tamaulipas, San Luis Potosí, Hidalgo, Tlaxcala, Oaxaca, Tabasco y Chiapas, Estado de México, Ciudad de México y Morelos.

Also, Mexico City is also in alert due to the constant raining; most streets are now under water. Many people have lost their homes. Rivers are flooding and there has been several subsidences all over the city’s streets. Until now, two people have perished. 

Mexico’s emergency numbers

9-1-1. National number for medical, civil protection, security and public services emergencies.

Below the cut, numbers and bank accounts to help. If you can and want to help, please let me know your state/city’s food bank or collection center location.

Keep reading

9

 Clapton noted that Sansa’s (Sophie Turner) costumes contained subtle references to her history, as well. After winning back Winterfell from her abusive husband and his army, Sansa’s stiff, black dress-and-cloak combinations have reflected “an idea of being wrapped, a sense of security, laced in, protected,” the costumer explained.“The cut of the costume was very fitted and severe but the fabrics were soft, textured and quilted. I was trying to grasp all that has happened to Sansa, all the hurt and abuse and frustration, and trying to understand how she would express this yet appear strong. She adapts all she has learnt to her look,” Clapton said.  [xxx
(requested by anon)

anonymous asked:

Any advice on how to write a heist story something like oceans Eleven?

Well, you can start by watching Ocean’s Eleven, and Ocean’s Eleven, and then Leverage, and then Burn Notice, and then The A-Team, and then Mission: Impossible, and then all the other heist stories like The Italian Job or Heat. Watch, read, uncover as many stories about criminals as you can from fiction to nonfiction to reading security analyst blogs. Read the spy memoirs, the thief memoirs, the fake ones and the real ones. Check out magicians, hypnotists, card tricks, and sleight of hand. Watch the making ofs and director’s commentaries looking for clues behind the thought process of these stories. The hows and the whys as you look into the research they did. Burn Notice, for example, is famous for using stunt props and technological rigs that work in real life. Like using cell phones to create cheap bugs on the go.

The worlds of criminal fiction and spy fiction rely on being able to present (or convincingly fake) a world which feels real. A heist is all about exploitation. So, you need a world with security structures to exploit. You’ve got to know how things work before you can craft a way to break them. Social engineering, hacking, and every other criminal skill is about breaking the systems in place. So, you’ve got to get a baseline for how law enforcement and security analysts work. What security systems are set up to look like. The ways we go about discouraging thieves. Better yet how people behave. Real, honest to god human behavior.

So, you know, pick somewhere in order to start your research. Get an idea of what you want write about stealing, then learn everything about the object, the museum, the city, the country, and its customs as you can.

If you’re setting a heist in a futuristic or fantasy setting then luck you, you get to make all of it up.

Learning the plot structure and conventions of the heist genre is the first step. This means watching lots and lots of heist movies, shows, and reading books. Over time, as you become better at critical analysis, you’ll begin to see specific story structures and character archetypes emerge.

The Heist Story is a genre. Like every other genre, it comes with its own structure, cliches, archetypes, plots, and genre conventions which necessitate the narrative. The better grasp you have of those, the better you’ll be at writing a heist.

For example, a heist story like Ocean’s Eleven relies on a collection of thieves rather than a single individual. The character types are as follows:

The Pointman - Your planner, strategist, team leader, and the Jack of All Trades. Can also be called the Mastermind. They’re the one who can take the place of anyone on the team should they fall through. They’re not as good as a specialist, but they’re very flexible. Narratively, he plans the cons and subs in where he’s needed.

The Faceman - Your experienced Grifter, here for all your social engineering needs. These guys talk their way in.

The Infiltrator - Your cat burglar or break-in artist. Basically, the conventional genre thief. Your Parker, Catwoman, Sam Fisher, or Solid Snake. The stealth bastards, they’re all about silent in, out, and playing acrobatic games with the lasers.

The Hacker - The electronics and demolitions specialist. Usually this is the guy in the van overseeing stuff remotely. Your Eye in the Sky. Their skill set can be split up and swapped around as necessary.

The Muscle - The one who is good at fighting. They’re combat focused characters, usually with mercenary and special forces backgrounds. Though, that’s optional.

The Wheelman - The one who handles the getaway. They’re your often overlooked transport specialists. It’s not just that they can drive, they’re skilled at getting lots of people around, figuring out how to move your valuables, and exiting hostile cities or countries undetected. They get the team in and they get them out.

For an example of these archetypes, I’m going to use Leverage. Nathan Ford, The Pointman (technically, he’s written like a Faceman). Sophie Devereaux , The Faceman. Parker, the Infiltrator. Hardison, the Hacker. Eliot, the Muscle. They all take turns being the Wheelman.

Other examples like Burn Notice: Michael Westen, the Pointman. Sam Axe, the Faceman. Fiona, the Muscle. They all take turns with explosives, Michael will invariably take all the roles during the course of the show.

Ocean’s Eleven has multiple variants of these archetypes, all broken down and mixed up.

You can mix and match these qualities into different individuals or break them apart like in Ocean’s Eleven, and more than one character can fill more than one role, but that’s the basic breakdown. For example, your hacker doesn’t need to be a guy in a van overlooking the whole security grid. One guy or girl with a cell phone can sit in the lobby of a building with an unsecured wireless network and crack the security. Welcome to the 21st century. The skills don’t necessarily need to take the specific expected shape.

What you do need is the basic breakdown:  You need someone to plan the con, you need someone to be your face or grifter, you need someone to break in, you need someone to watch the security/electronics, you need muscle to back you up, and someone’s got to cover the getaway.

These shift depending on your plan, but this is the expected lineup for a heist narrative. The first step of a heist narrative is not the plan because we don’t have one yet. We’ve got an idea. Pick your target. Maybe it’s a famous painting. Maybe it’s a casino. Maybe it’s a rare artifact from a private investor’s collection loaned to a museum for a short period of time. Maybe it’s art stolen by the Nazis during WWII. Whatever it is, figure it out.

The next step is simple. If you want the thing, you’ve got to find a way to get it. This is a big job, your standard thief won’t be able to pull it off alone. So, you gotta go recruiting. Get your team together. Make sure to establish the goals of the different members for joining. Who they are. Their pedigree. One might be an old flame or an old enemy. This is where we lay out some character driven subplots.

When everyone’s together, we’ve got to lay out the plan. Before we have a plan though, we need to establish where the object is and the issues in getting it. Why this has never been done before. So, what are the challenges? Invariably, an object worth a great deal of money will have a lot of security protecting it. Figure out what that security is, who the item belongs to, what sort of retribution do the thieves face beyond what they might expect. Lasers, pressure plates, cameras, security, other career criminals, mob bosses, the rich and powerful, whatever.

After that: How do you get it? Then you’ve got to plan the con, while taking everything into account.

Then, We prep the Con. There will be steps to take before the con can be put into place, your characters taking their positions in plain sight. Stealing whatever pieces you need to make it work. Casing the joint. Etc.

Then: Run the Con. This is the part with the actual stealing. Better known as the first attempt. Things go well, there may be a few mistakes, but things are going well and then we…

Encounter Resistance. While running the con, something goes wrong, pieces fall apart, the thieves come close to success but the object gets moved and they suddenly need a new plan. New information may pop up, it may be one of your artists was running a con of their own separate from the rest. If there’s a double cross in the works then this may be when and where it lands.

We’re ready now, so it’s time hit up: Steal the Thing, Round Two. Your characters put their new plan into play and get about thieving the object of their desire.

Lastly: The Get Away. This is the part where your thieves make for the hills with their stolen treasure. This can be short or long depending on the kind of story you’re telling and other double crosses may occur here. It could be the end of the story or the beginning of a new heist.

Heist stories are like mystery novels. They’re all about sleight of hand and misdirection. You’ve got to keep just enough information on the table to keep your audience on the hook, and just enough information off the table to surprise them later on the twist. Yet, when they go back to re-read the novel again, they’ll find the answer was there all along. They just didn’t see it coming.

If anything, learning how to write a well-done heist or a mystery or any kind of novel in this genre will teach you a lot about how to manage your foreshadowing and create superb plot twists. Like any good con, you need to lay out all the conflicting pieces where people can see them, let them draw their own conclusions, withhold the critical context, and then hit them with the whammy.

Like lots of audiences, new writers (and even some old ones) can get distracted by the shock and awe. They see they’re impressed by the conclusion, not the lay-up. If you want to write any kind of fiction, you need to learn to see past the curtain and pay attention to the critical pieces leading into an important moment rather than the moment itself.

Good writing isn’t modular, you can’t just strip out pieces and run with them because you’ll end up missing the crucial, sometimes innocuous pieces that ensured the scene worked. Like the Victorian Hand Touch, every moment between the two leads and most of their scenes with secondary players are working for that singular instance of eventual, gleeful catharsis.

If you’ve got a plot twist coming in your novel, every sentence from the second you start writing is working towards it. You start laying out your pieces, funneling in your tricks, and playing with misdirection. You may have multiple twists, to cover yourself, divert your audience, congratulate them for successfully guessing your ploy, and reassure their initial suspicions before catching them again on the upswing.

The clever writer is as much a con artist as their characters. The only difference is the target of their con is their audience. The tricks in their bag are narrative ones, and they work with the understanding that it doesn’t matter if someone guesses the end so long as they’re entertained by the journey. A great story stays entertaining long after the audience has figured out all the twists.

So, don’t get caught up in Red Herrings and frightened about not being able to outsmart other people. Tell a good story with conviction and heart about a bunch of crooks out to steal their heart’s desire.

That’s all there is to it.

-Michi

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Emotional Completion ::

Aries moon: Feels they need independence from others and to build self-assertion and willpower, wants to feel emotionally strong and have conscious awareness over emotional impulses

Taurus moon: Feels they need to accumulate palpable security, absolute protection of themselves and their values, and discover the genuine meaning of beauty

Gemini moon: Feels they need mental arousal, social connection, intellectual accumulation and a safe space to freely communicate thoughts, opinions and emotions

Cancer moon: Feels they need to find a place of privacy and a home of safety within & without so that they may ease their fear of abandonment. Feels they need to strengthen their healing and empathy powers as to nurture themselves and loved ones

Leo moon: Feels they need to vibrantly express themselves and to acquire self-validation, self-respect and confidence in their abilities. Feels they need to spread love and optimism 

Virgo moon:  Feels they need to find structural serenity within and ease mental restlessness through emotional organization. Must feel their emotional services are needed by loved ones.

Libra moon: Feels they need love, interpersonal connection and to relate/understand cohesively with others to fill emotional hollowness and to acquire equilibrium within 

Scorpio moon: Feels they need utter privacy and a safe space for severe self-reflection so that they may organize emotions and purge toxicity of the past

Sagittarius moon: Feels they need space and freedom both mentally and physically and to exercise their mind through meditative or adventurous methods. Feels the need to discover meanings of life and to accumulate faith and beliefs to look up to

Capricorn moon:  Feels they need control and Order of their emotions, emotional maturity, a sense of belonging, palpable security and structural guidance so that they may navigate life efficiently

Aquarius moon: Feels they need liberation and independence to express their individualism. Feels they need social awareness, connection and mentally stimulating circumstances in their lives

Pisces moon: Feels they need emotional retreat through introspection or spiritual and creative outlets. Feels they need to receive wholesome love and affection from loved ones

Civilization  has declined, people ride horse carts alongside empty self driving cars, security drones protect empty tower blocks, you’ve just found an RFID tracker chip in a mummified hand, only you can unlock the wonders of a bygone era.

3

And that means to hell with what happens to us.

Mycroft is being completely counterintuitive. If they’re going to have any chance of beating Eurus, it’s John who should die. John knows it, Mycroft knows it, Sherlock knows it, and yet it’s not John at the end of the barrel. It’s Mycroft. For someone who claims to be missing a heart, the love that Mycroft feels for his little brother is stronger than the logic he reveres. And so despite all that brain power and potential Mycroft knows he offers if he lives, he chooses to put it all aside and be a solider. To do his duty. To protect Sherlock. To be big brother.