secret camouflage

Humans are Weird

So, I just thought of my own humans-are-the-weird-ones thing. What if humans were the only race to develop clothing and other things that are used simply to change our appearance. The other races don’t use clothing for protection from their home environments, and use vehicles for exploring non-native environments. Armor exists, but in a non-ornamental way, and generally doesn’t do much to change appearance, or is at least non-individualized. Makeup and nail polish are unknown, though tattoos and piercings are known to be used by some cultures for ranking and identification purposes and are not used ornamentally by any race other than humans. Hairstyles are not unknown, but are all generally for practical (keep it out of the way! I need insulation! I need shade!) reasons.

At first, aliens just think that there are a lot more humans than there really are, that humans that look alike with small differences are just family members, and that humans just naturally tend to be known solely by their family name. (Like, Alien “Ralph” meets Human “Bella Tailor” one day, sees her the next day in a different outfit, and thinks that he/she is meeting a relative of the human he/she met earlier, and that their family name is “BellaTailor.”)

Humans, at first, just thought that aliens were terrible at matching faces and names… and that they were apparently all nudists, but hey, who cares? Different cultures and races and all that, you know.


“Hello, BellaTailor. My name is Ralph. I believe I met your relative the other day. How is she doing?”

“I do not have a sister, Ralph. You must be mistaken.”

“That cannot be! She looks just like you, only more… pink, I believe is the correct color-word… and has your name! You must be relatives! It would be too much of a coincidence for you to not be related!”

“Where… exactly… did you meet my ‘sister’?” 

“Oh! We were on the same shuttle together. I must admit I am surprised; I thought that there was only one human on the ship’s roster.”

“Ralph, I am the human you met there. Remember how we talked about how uncomfortable those one-race-fits-all shuttle seats are?”

“But… no… you are different colors and patterns! This is a terrible joke. I wouldn’t suggest trying it on anyone else.”

“Dude, all I did was change my clothes. It’s not like I’m a whole ‘nother person, despite what commercials and such would have you believe.”

“Clothes?”

“Right… nudist… um… let me just… show you?”

Bella precedes to take off her top (not like they’ll care, they’re nudist anyway, right? eep, here goes nothing, really hope this is okay). Ralph thinks she means that they’re a race that sheds their skin, though he’s put out and puzzled over how no one mentioned that fact to anyone. After all, shedded skins can really clutter up an area, especially at the rate she seems to shed, though it could explain a few things. Bella, frustrated, puts her top back on, takes Ralph to her quarters, and shows him her clothing (which was still mostly packed due to limited storage space). Ralph finally sort-of understands, but the idea is totally trippy and weird to him.

“What did you think I brought so much luggage for?” 

“Well, I didn’t really want to pry, and your planet is… a bit… cluttered…”

*sigh* “Dude, I can’t… I just… urgh! WHY ME?!?!?!”


After many misunderstandings the aliens are brought to understand that humans can change their appearance in many ways, practically at-will. 

Then the whole issue of “camouflage” comes up. By this point, humans have developed advanced camouflage that automatically mimics the wearer’s surroundings. The other races react in various ways. Some are rather neutral about this discovery. Others are afraid. But many desire to obtain the art and secrets of “camouflage” for themselves. The earth and humans are now at the center of a conflict that borders on war - Intergalactic war. Because we’re the only race to have actually thought of camouflage. Thankfully, the other races begin to catch on before full-blown war is unleashed, but it is a very close thing.


@howtotrainyournana @crossroadsdimension Look! I came up with one! :D YAY for tired-brain-creativity! WHOOO (don’t really feel tired now, but I should be, and I know I will be when I have to wake up in four hours. :/ why does the coffee only seem to work when you actually want/need to sleep?)

anonymous asked:

What's a good thick under eye concealer? That can hide dark circles

  • Tarte Shape Tape
  • KVD Lock-It
  • It Bye Bye Undereye 
  • Becca Ultimate Coverage Concealer
  • Kevyn Aucion The Sensual Skin Enhancer
  • Anastasia Beverly Hills Concealer
  • Laura mercies Secret Camouflage 
  • Nars Creamy Radiant
  • Mac Pro Longwear
  • Lancôme Waterproof Protective Undereye Concealer
How to Use NARS Radiant Creamy Concealer

NARS Radiant Creamy Concealer is one of my all-time favourite concealers, it gives great coverage, blends beautifully and looks natural on the skin, but a lot of people use certain techniques with the product which means they don’t get the most effective and attractive results out of the product.

Keep reading

Sorry dictionary, but the term “baking” has a new definition. What we normally associate with sticking a combination of eggs, sugar, and flour in the oven has now become a new beauty trend fresh off Instagram. While it originated as a theater technique to flatter complexions under hot spotlights, it was later adopted by the drag set to create a feminine face shape and make concealer last longer where it matters most. Now, baking is finally getting the attention it deserves, all thanks to celebrity makeup artists and selfie queens singing its praises. We’ve created a step-by-step tutorial that makes baking a piece of cake—plus a visual guide courtesy of Huda Kattan of Huda Beauty. But first, it’s important to see whether baking is right for you. The overall result gives a full-coverage, matte finish—so if you’re a dewy loyalist, you might want to steer clear of the bakery. Normally, the technique is better suited for a photo studio than the street, but our guide is perfect for an everyday baked look that’s totally wearable. Let’s get started! JESSICA VELEZ

STEP ONE: With your foundation and contouring already completed, apply a concealer with a sheer-to-medium level of coverage to your Triangle of Light (a V-shaped area created from the inner corner of your eye to your nostril, and from your nostril to the other corner of your eye). tarte Amazonian Clay Waterproof 12-Hour Concealer and Laura Mercier Secret Camouflage are great options because they’re both emollient. Then, blend the concealer using a beautyblender.

STEP TWO: Apply a loose setting powder—NARS Light Reflecting Loose Setting Powder would be perfect—to the same area you applied the concealer using a fluffy brush such as the SEPHORA COLLECTION hakuho-do + Sephora PRO Large Teardrop Pointed Powder Brush (Otsubu), and let it sit on your skin for one to three minutes. While the shade of NARS’s powder is nearly universal, deeper skin tones could switch it up with a banana-hued powder, while fairer skin tones would benefit from a powder with pink or peach undertones. For medium skin tones, stick with a translucent powder.

STEP THREE: Using the same brush as in STEP TWO, dust away the remaining setting powder that wasn’t absorbed into the skin using a light, flicking motion. OPTIONAL: for more coverage, first dip your brush into a medium-to-full coverage complexion powder, such as Kat Von D Lock-It Powder Foundation, and then dust off the setting powder with the dipped brush. This creates an exchange and buildup of product.

STEP FOUR: Finish with a setting spray, like Urban Decay All Nighter Long-Lasting Makeup Setting Spray.

NOTE: To remove this buildup of product at the end of the day, we recommend a two-step cleansing routine. First, start with an oil or a balm. boscia Makeup-Breakup Cool Cleansing Oil and Clinique’s Take The Day Off Balm work wonders. Then, follow up with your favorite everyday cleanser.

SHOP ALL BAKING MAKEUP >

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NARS / Light Reflecting Loose Setting Powder
$36.00

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SEPHORA COLLECTION / Bright Future Gel Serum Concealer
$14.00

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Laura Mercier / Translucent Loose Setting Powder
$37.00

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beautyblender / the original beautyblender®
$20.00

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SEPHORA COLLECTION / Bright Set Loose Finishing Powder
$16.00

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NARS / Radiant Creamy Concealer
$29.00

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MAKE UP FOR EVER / Mist & Fix
$30.00

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tarte / Maracuja Creaseless Concealer
$25.00

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Urban Decay / All Nighter Long-Lasting Makeup Setting Spray
$30.00

anonymous asked:

do you recommend any concealers (I'm looking for long wearing/mostly full coverage ones)

  • Tarte Shape Tape (oily/combo)
  • Mac Pro Longwear (oily/combo)
  • MUFE Full Coverage (oily/combo)
  • It Cosmetics Bye Bye Undereyes (dry/combo)
  • Nars Soft Matte (oily/combo)
  • Kevyn Auction Sensual Skin Enhancer (dry/combo)
  • Laura Mercier Secret Camouflage (all)
  • Becca Ultimate Coverage (dry/combo)

Makeup

I do a concoction of stuff. Right now, I mix YSL Le Teint Touché Éclat Illuminating Foundation and a bit of the Laura Mercier Illuminating Tinted Moisturizer together with my fingers and just rub it onto my face. And I use this Laura Mercier Secret Camouflage for under my eyes—you have to cover that shit. To finish, I’ll pat Chanel Sublimage Cream on my cheeks for a bit of a glow.

When I’m wearing makeup, I choose between doing my eyes or mouth because I don’t want to look like a beauty pageant child. I’ve got quite a strong face—if it’s got too much on, I just look like a man in drag. Lips are usually easiest to do. I’m so pleased that they started selling this again—Rio Rio by Topshop. I told Liv Tyler about that. Chanel Rouge Allure Incandescente 97 is a good red, as well. If I’m doing eyes, then I use a lighter lip, and for that I’m obsessed with all the YSL peachy, salmon-y colors. I love the Rouge Volupte in Rose Infinite 7. Their nudes are really good.

Because I have the luxury of having my makeup done frequently, I don’t have a huge collection of products. But I am an avid wearer of eyeliner—I would say I’m wearing it 90 percent of the time. Someone at a dinner recently asked me if it was tattooed on because they’ve never seen me without it, which I actually think would be wonderful…though I’ve gotten really good at doing it. I’ve done mine for so many years that I can just draw it on really quickly. It’s funny, the makeup brand Eyeko approached me to collaborate, and we had a meeting and talked ideas and they asked if I wanted to help develop some products. It really made sense. So, it started with just the Skinny Liquid Eyeliner, which is a pen. I really love it—before I was using a brush and pot, but it’s so much to take with you, and you’re always getting your bag dirty with the brush, and you have to clean it every time; it’s a nightmare. The pens are much better. My technique is to start with the little flicks on the outside first, and then fill it in. Sometimes, I’ll do just a tiny line for a brunch, but if I’m going out for the night, then I’ll experiment with thicker lines. If you mess it up, then you just have to go with the flow and it becomes a full look. Anyway, then we did the Eye Do Mascara, and we’re now working on the Me and My Shadow stick, which is a thicker version of a kohl pencil and the idea is that you can just kind of smudge it on. It has a brush on the other end to help. It’s so easy, and really the best I’ve used.

The culture in England is such that it’s really not cool to look like you’ve tried so hard. If someone’s gone to the spa to get their nails done, you’re like, ‘Oh rate yourself!’ which is saying, like, ‘Ooh you’re fancy!’ It’s seen as very self-indulgent. Though, in America, if you’re pampering yourself and getting the blowout and the rest of it, you’re seen as doing really well and it’s celebrated. In England, it’s the opposite—it’s very embarrassing to seem your lording it up over people. It’s just not about being ‘done.’ We’re into being clean, just not looking like you’ve made too much of an effort.

THE TIP-OFF: INTENSE MAGENTA LIPS BY BITE BEAUTY

Sephora PRO Artist Ilde Goncalves shows us how to get a vibrant look with Bite Beauty.

You can have dirty, disheveled hair and mascara everywhere except for your eyelashes. But if you have a gorgeous lip, you will look impossibly chic and put together. In this how-to, expert beautifier Ilde gives us pointers on achieving the perfect lip. BECKY PEDERSON

STEP ONE
Exfoliate with Whipped Cherry Lip Scrub. This will help prevent feathering, plus your lips will look plumped and hydrated.

PRO TIP
Ilde suggests letting the scrub sit on your lips for at least two minutes to reap the full benefits.

STEP TWO
Apply BB For Lips in Natural directly from the bullet—no lip brush necessary. This acts as a treatment to further hydrate lips.

PRO TIP
“If I’m doing full-face makeup on someone,” notes Ilde, “I always prep by moisturizing the lips. I work on the face for about 30 minutes and leave the treatment on the whole time. But before you put on your lipstick, you definitely need to remove the excess product with a tissue or blotting paper—otherwise, the lipstick won’t stick.”

STEP THREE
Apply the Luminous Crème Lipstick in Violet. Because this magenta color is intensely vibrant, Ilde applied the first coat with the SEPHORA COLLECTION Pro Lip Brush #81 to see how it looked as a wash. We decided we wanted a brighter lip, so we applied the second coat directly from the bullet.

PRO TIP
Ilde says, “You should always harmonize” and match the rest of your makeup to your lips. For this color, use a pinky blush instead of a peach.

STEP FOUR
Apply a layer of Lush Fruit Lip Gloss in Mangosteen. Ilde swipes a spot of gloss on the back of his hand and then carefully dips the applicator in, like you would when applying concealer. This method allows for more control over the distribution of the product.

PRO TIP
Ilde shares a tip he got from Dany Sanz of Make Up For Ever: “Don’t forget to do the corner of your lips. Women will often forget about the corners, and then your lips look smaller than they actually are.”

STEP FIVE
Dab concealer around your lips. Ilde likes to apply Laura Mercier Secret Camouflage with the SEPHORA COLLECTION Pro Precision Concealer Brush #45. Evening out your skintone with concealer will make your lips pop.

PRO TIP
“I also like to use shimmering highlighter on the Cupid’s bow. It really enhances the lips, especially for pictures.”

SHOP BITE BEAUTY>

“I grew up in a miniature village in the middle of the countryside in England, quite secluded from the outside world. I was always enamored by the fashion industry. I’d read Vogue magazines at the hairdresser’s while I was waiting for my mom to get her hair done and used to write essays on the fashion world with my friend Lucinda who lived up the road. This was before blogs or Internet or stuff like that. Even now, I consider myself mostly a journalist because I write interviews for a living. I did TV for a bit, and somewhere along the line I started writing a column for The Independent newspaper in England, and now I write features for British Vogue. It’s a bit braggy to say, but I’m over here [in New York] writing cover stories on couture, but literally no one knows that I do it!

But it was because of the TV shows that I first really got into the fashion thing. I went to a Chanel show because I had to interview Karl Lagerfeld and everyone thought I was there as one of the ‘It girls’ that sit front row, but I went backstage because I was working. I walked up to talk to Karl and his bodyguard told me that I could do the very last interview and that everyone else had to just record it. I was like, ‘Fuck!’ So I went to the front of the group and forgot all my questions. The only thing I could remember about the show was the music, so I asked why he played The Shirelles. He was really happy because someone was asking a new type of question for once, and my relationship with Chanel kind of grew out of that. Once they’d been like, ‘She’s all right guys,’ the fashion world was like, ‘Oh!? Who’s this guy?’ and I started doing more and more of that.

So, suddenly people became interested in what I was wearing. As a [TV] presenter, you’re given a budget each season to buy a wardrobe that you’d choose from for each show. It wasn’t that much money, so I’d buy two nice pairs of shoes and one really lovely blouse, and the rest I’d fill in with H&M, Topshop, and Zara. Because of that, people at home would be like, ‘Oh, I’ve got that top, but it’s interesting that she’s putting it with those boots,’ etcetera. It was once people began taking my picture every time I left the house—because it’s an easy fashion shot—that I started getting a bit weirder about going out without any makeup on, and I think that’s when I started wearing foundation every day.

Makeup

I do a concoction of stuff. Right now, I mix YSL Le Teint Touché Éclat Illuminating Foundation and a bit of the Laura Mercier Illuminating Tinted Moisturizer together with my fingers and just rub it onto my face. And I use this Laura Mercier Secret Camouflage for under my eyes—you have to cover that shit. To finish, I’ll pat Chanel Sublimage Cream on my cheeks for a bit of a glow.

When I’m wearing makeup, I choose between doing my eyes or mouth because I don’t want to look like a beauty pageant child. I’ve got quite a strong face—if it’s got too much on, I just look like a man in drag. Lips are usually easiest to do. I’m so pleased that they started selling this again—Rio Rio by Topshop. I told Liv Tyler about that. Chanel Rouge Allure Incandescente 97 is a good red, as well. If I’m doing eyes, then I use a lighter lip, and for that I’m obsessed with all the YSL peachy, salmon-y colors. I love the Rouge Volupte in Rose Infinite 7. Their nudes are really good.

Because I have the luxury of having my makeup done frequently, I don’t have a huge collection of products. But I am an avid wearer of eyeliner—I would say I’m wearing it 90 percent of the time. Someone at a dinner recently asked me if it was tattooed on because they’ve never seen me without it, which I actually think would be wonderful…though I’ve gotten really good at doing it. I’ve done mine for so many years that I can just draw it on really quickly. It’s funny, the makeup brand Eyeko approached me to collaborate, and we had a meeting and talked ideas and they asked if I wanted to help develop some products. It really made sense. So, it started with just the Skinny Liquid Eyeliner, which is a pen. I really love it—before I was using a brush and pot, but it’s so much to take with you, and you’re always getting your bag dirty with the brush, and you have to clean it every time; it’s a nightmare. The pens are much better. My technique is to start with the little flicks on the outside first, and then fill it in. Sometimes, I’ll do just a tiny line for a brunch, but if I’m going out for the night, then I’ll experiment with thicker lines. If you mess it up, then you just have to go with the flow and it becomes a full look. Anyway, then we did the Eye Do Mascara, and we’re now working on the Me and My Shadow stick, which is a thicker version of a kohl pencil and the idea is that you can just kind of smudge it on. It has a brush on the other end to help. It’s so easy, and really the best I’ve used.

The culture in England is such that it’s really not cool to look like you’ve tried so hard. If someone’s gone to the spa to get their nails done, you’re like, ‘Oh rate yourself!’ which is saying, like, ‘Ooh you’re fancy!’ It’s seen as very self-indulgent. Though, in America, if you’re pampering yourself and getting the blowout and the rest of it, you’re seen as doing really well and it’s celebrated. In England, it’s the opposite—it’s very embarrassing to seem like you’re lording it up over people. It’s just not about being ‘done.’ We’re into being clean, just not looking like you’ve made too much of an effort.

Hair

It’s like with my hair: I wash it every day because I have to—it gets so greasy. But then I just literally tuck it behind my ears and wait for it to dry. I’ve gotten disparaging comments about this before because people get annoyed about it. They’re like, ‘I’m so sick of Alexa pretending she doesn’t do anything.’ No, I really don’t. I’m mixed race—I’ve got half Chinese hair, half Caucasian hair—so it’s very fine and naturally bends as it dries. I have a pathological fear of using products in my hair because, again, it’s so greasy. I do like the Wella Ocean Spritz Beach Texture Hairspray, and I’ll use the L’Oréal Texture Expert True Grip powder in the back at the crown to give it some volume. But it’s like cement, so you have to use it so sparingly. You don’t just pour it straight onto the top; I lift up pieces up and dust it in beneath.

I do have to switch up shampoos quite regularly because otherwise my hair will get used to it and I’ll get build-up, or it starts going really greasy. I just found a Klorane Shampoo with Quinine and B Vitamins, which leaves you with a nice dry texture. L’Oréal INOA Color Care is good, too. And then I use conditioner just on the ends; it helps keep my fringe from getting too greasy. For conditioner, I like Pureology Pure Volume.

I get the impulse to cut my hair or change my look every day. I used to have a bob, and then one day I just realized like, ‘OK, the jig is up—boys just like long hair.’ I hate to generalize, but they do! So I thought, ‘Why don’t I just look nice for a second?’ and I grew it out. I’d be imagining what it’d be like to flick my hair, or what it would be like when I could finally tie it up, and then as soon as it hit the optimal length, I was like, ‘Oh my God, I want a bob again ‘cause it’s cool.’ I think it’s boring to stay in the same lane too long. My plan is to have a bob when I’m older anyway; my mom always had one her whole life and I think it’s more flattering than long hair when you’re older.

My hairdresser, George Northwood, and I came up with the idea of 'Future Cuts’ because I’m so weird about who cuts my hair. He literally might be the reason people like my hair, because he’s so clever with it. But I travel so much and have to be away from him, so we’ll have to plan in advance what we want to do. For example, the plan was to grow out my fringe and then cut it short, so during that process he’s done less layering so it grows nicely. 'Future Cuts’ are about planning ahead instead of being reactive, so it grows into the thing you want it to be.

Body

I do like traveling, though, because I like to steal the tiny bottles of whatever’s up at the hotels. Aesop is the best score. Also I love how the products smell at Hôtel Costes in Paris, so I’ll stock up when I go. I’ll keep stealing the products day after day, so they have to keep refilling, and that way I can get as much as possible. Sometimes they don’t refill it—they know the game. Now they’re like, ‘Oh, Ms. Chung is in 205. Don’t restock, she’s pilfering the products.’ I think of it as like a hotel heist, like I’m a beauty heist burglar. One time, at the Ritz Paris I took their entire bath set. I was like, ‘I’ll take a bathrobe, a bath mat, some of these pink towels—all of it.’

I love taking baths. When I was younger, I went out with a much older man and he had all of these beauty products and bath stuff and it was the first time I’d been exposed to these lovely things. Aesop Geranium is my favorite body wash—isn’t it absurd that something like a fancy body wash can make you think you’re an adult? Also for body, I use Kiehl’s Creme de Corps, or I’ll mix Rodin oil with some Cetaphil Moisturizing Cream, but it’s got such a pungent fragrance to it that it can be a little too much. I definitely use deodorant every day—the Pomegranate Crystal Essence Natural Protection Mineral Deodorant. I think it works, but I’m also not very sweaty. You have to use it for about a week and then it starts working. That’s the only one I can use because I don’t want armpit cancer. Also I just started trying out the Yu-Be Moisturizing Skin Cream on my body and it’s working really well. It stinks, too—it smells like Tiger Balm, which is not great, but it does actually keep you hydrated for the whole day. They said they use it in Japan for, like, mountain climbing when you’re going to be freezing and dry.

Skincare

My skin is drier than the Sahara desert—it’s like sandpaper and the outside of a cactus had sex and made my skin. So, whereas some people are like, ‘I hate oily things because I get breakouts!’ I’m like, ‘No, give me a vat of oil that I can dunk my head into, please.’ We had this disaster recently—I say ‘we’ because Tamah is my makeup artist and pal, and we just found out that our favorite moisturizer, Moisturel Therapeutic Cream, which was basically like Cetaphil cream but thicker, has been discontinued. Why? We just don’t know. So I’m on the hunt for the best moisturizer. Currently I use a mixture of stuff. I’m trying out Cetaphil mixed with Decleor oil, but I’ll do anything that I think might save me. Yesterday I just put Papaw all over my face on a plane because it got pretty bad. We are having a crisis, a full-on crisis. And it’s the same thing for the body—problematic in the moisture department, all year round. I did get prescribed fish oil, I should do that again. Solros-Tval Swedish Dream Sunflower Facial Soap is good—I use it as my face wash. I love it mostly because of the packaging; I give it to people for Christmas in a stocking. Plus, it doesn’t dry out my skin too much, and it says it’s made of egg whites, and it’s five bucks. Though I’m not very good about washing my face; I don’t really do it before bed.

Fragrance

For fragrance, I’m trying out Lys 41 Perfume Oil from Le Labo; it’s like a nicer way to wear perfume. You just drop it on and rub it in; I mix it with my moisturizers. I always write ‘Magic Potion’ on my perfume bottles so when I use them it feels magical—I make spells in the morning when I put them on. I’m not really into astrology, though. I’m a bit sick of people talking about astrology in New York. I’ll say something and someone will go, ‘That’s because you’re Scorpio,’ and I’m like, ‘Or it’s because I’m an individual who’s having a unique circumstance and reacting to it in a normal way?’ I do like reading my star signs, but I don’t take it too seriously.

Exercise

The way I look isn’t about feeling sexy for me; I like to feel hilarious and quick-witted. A guy said to me the other day, ‘Oh, you look really pretty!’ and I was like, ‘Ugh.’ I can’t handle that. I’d rather hear, ‘Oh, you sound clever today!’ So now he’s like ‘You’re really clever, Alexa,’ but he doesn’t mean it. I do work out to kind of maintain things—I’m obsessed with Ballet Beautiful; it’s good. I have a one-on-one situation, I try to go three times a week, but not in pointe shoes. It’s all normal exercises, they just make you think its ballet because you have to move your arm in a certain way. But I only just got into that. Before that, when I was modeling, I used to do yoga and swimming and jogging and then I stopped and I realized that my body looked exactly the same. Then I turned 30 and I thought I should probably start doing something. I chose ballet for the outfits. I don’t think I look that different, but I feel better. I just feel like if I’m naked walking around in front of a boy I’m less embarrassed about that. I feel tighter, you know? Like you’re not shuffling backwards out of the room when you exit.”

Hide and Seek

Title: Hide and Seek

Pairing: Bucky x Reader (ish)

Prompt: “There were only so many things you could hide from”

There were only so many things you could hide from, and Bucky Barnes during hide and seek was not one of them. It seemed the ex-assassin truly had a talent for sniffing out his opponents, so much so that he was almost uninvited from the most recent installment of Tony’s “Act Like Teenagers Because Being an Adult is Hard” night because his proficiency made the game considerably less fun.

According to Steve, this was nothing new. Even without the heightened senses and reaction time that being a super-soldier promised, Bucky had been an excellent seeker when he and Steve played as children, ensuring that Steve had never won a single game in their 70+ years of friendship. Apparently, Steve wasn’t nearly as tenacious as you.

Your plan had taken just a small amount of time from your day to day life and largely consisted of you busting out a small, yet sufficient, cubby hole into the corner of your closet. Had you destroyed the walls? Yes. Had you wasted time and energy? Yes. Were you about to beat the Winter Soldier at hide and seek? Absolutely yes.

For weeks you had been stockpiling junk food and soda in your cleared-out closet, prepared for however long you’d need to stay hidden to make Bucky surrender his crown to the Queen (you). So, when Tony declared the hunt as officially having begun, you were absolutely ready to make your stand and to wage war against your opponent.

When Bucky began his countdown at a painstakingly slow pace which he claimed helped “even the playing field”, you set off quickly and speedily found your secret hiding spot within moments; however, it seemed that someone else had discovered your secret weapon.

“Get out, Steve!” You angrily whispered to the muscular, blonde man who had somehow managed to cram his absurdly huge body far enough into the cubby hole that he could close the secret door, camouflaging him to anyone who didn’t know just where to look.

“With all due respect, that’s not happening.”

“Steve this is my hiding space!”

“I have been waiting 70 years to beat him,” he hissed, “70 years. I need this!”

“Fine,” you said, noticing that his face looked like that of a broken man, “but you have let me ride your motorcycle whenever I want.”

“Deal.”


He had won the metaphorical crown, but it had only been your second time on Steve’s bike before you decimated it by accidentally running it into the garage. Staring at the rubble of what was once a beautiful bike, you turned to Steve and asked, “Was it worth it?”

“Absolutely.”