seamstress

Britt Ekland,phtographed by Philippe Le Tellier, in the presence of a seamstress, try a combination of a turtleneck, a mini skirt and a sleeveless jacket in the dressing room of a studio in 1969

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its scarf season!

interested in getting a cuddly cute pride scarf while also supporting a friendly neighborhood ace genderfluid blogger?? boy do i have good news for you

im looking to make and sell these pride scarves (cat not included) to fund opening my new store for custom sewing and commission work

all profits from this store will go toward:

  • feeding me!
  • getting me through college!
  • fixing my car!
  • replacing my broken computer!
  • moving away from my transphobic mother!
  • seeing my girlfriend!
  • keeping me away from awful jobs that agitate my ptsd!
  • finally getting me to a doctor so i can have my eating disorder diagnosed and treated!
  • and so much more!

all scarves will be made out of 100% anti-pill or blizzard fleece solids (if you have a preference) and i will be making them in any and every sexual romantic and/or gender orientation pride colors or combination thereof

the scarf modelled above is the ace scarf and it measures at about 65 inches (or 165 cm) - scarf lengths will vary according to how many colors are in your pride flag, since i measure them by each stripe (each being around 5 inches)

scarf (approximate) lengths and prices will be:
small: 60-70 inches, $25 USD
medium: 90-100 inches, $30 USD
large: 120-130 inches, $35 USD
prices include shipping and material costs

custom sizing is available if needed but longer scarves will cost more

i AM willing to ship outside of the US but keep in mind itll cost a little bit more for shipping

send me your orders or questions in an ask or shoot me an email at mountainousinfinity@gmail.com

if you cant afford a scarf please do me a big favor and signal boost! every little bit helps

thanks a lot guys

🌿✨🌿 Forest spirits🌿✨🌿
I’m totally in love with this photo!!
-Styling: @fairycave
-Photo/edition: @rebecasaray
-Model: @odei_ch
-Make-up: Dni makeup
-Assitant: Luis Palen
~Rebeca Saray workshop, Madrid 2016~

Made with Instagram
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I am so excited for the release of my newest cosplay pattern as part of my collaboration with The McCall Pattern Company! The Cupped Corset Pattern is now available in my shoppe!

Buy the brand new pattern here: Cupped Corset Pattern

The M339 pattern features:

- Very close fitting, fully lined and boned corset
- Separately sized cups (A/B, C and D cups)
- Underwire and seam details
- Option to make waist cincher
- High back for extra support
- Grommet lacing closure

For many years, I searched for a well-fitting corset pattern with cups, until finally I designed my dream pattern with The McCall Pattern Company! For women of different sizes and shapes, it is so important to be able to tailor a corset to fit each of our unique bodies, and the separate cups allow you to customize the corset to YOUR shape and ensure greater comfort and style.

Additionally, you can use views A and B to easily make flattering waist cinchers, giving this pattern the added bonus of versatility and choice.

All patterns come signed by me!

* * *

YayaHan.com | My Online Store

youtube

Today’s video is on a basic skill every cosplayer should have! How to make your own bias tape. ❤

I am so excited for the release of my newest cosplay pattern as part of my collaboration with The McCall Pattern Company! The Cupped Corset Pattern is now available in my shoppe!

The M339 features:

- Very close fitting, fully lined and boned corset
- Separately sized cups (A/B, C and D cups)
- Underwire and seam details
- Option to make waist cincher
- High back for extra support
- Grommet lacing closure

For many years, I searched for a well-fitting corset pattern with cups, until finally I designed my dream pattern with The McCall Pattern Company! For women of different sizes and shapes, it is so important to be able to tailor a corset to fit each of our unique bodies, and the separate cups allow you to customize the corset to YOUR shape and ensure greater comfort and style.

Additionally, you can use views A and B to easily make flattering waist cinchers, giving this pattern the added bonus of versatility and choice.

All patterns come signed by me!

* * *

Buy the pattern here: Cupped Corset Pattern

YayaHan.com | My Online Store

Review: Yaya Han’s Ultimate Bodysuit Pattern

I gave this pattern a try while prepping for my recent Zero Suit Samus cosplay. I have a few bodysuit options in my pattern stash already; in the past, I’ve constructed bodysuits using my own drafted patterns and Kwik Sew 3052, as well as customizing multiple derivative patterns using either of the above as a base. When I got my hands on Yaya Han’s Ultimate Bodysuit Pattern, I wanted to see how it stacked up and whether it could live up to its title as a go-to bodysuit pattern in the future.

The major difference between this pattern and other bodysuit patterns I’ve used before is the large number of panels. The torso consists of 12 panels alone, plus two panels for each leg, and one for each arm and collar. Bodysuits can be made with as few as one panel for the legs and torso combined; this pattern breaks up the same area into 16 different pieces. More panels means more time spent cutting, pinning, and sewing; however, every seam provides another opportunity to more finely-tune the fit. If your end goal is to make a solid color bodysuit or one with simple seam lines, an experienced seamstress will probably end up combining some panels where the extra seams are unnecessary. With this in mind, having a multitude of panels has limited benefits. If your end goal is to make a bodysuit with complex seams and many panels, such as the Zero suit or a plugsuit, starting with a closely fit mockup has more of an advantage.

Each section of the bodysuit is divided up with reconfiguration in mind. For instance, separating the leg and arm pieces allows you to omit them if desired. Another example is the undercup seam, which is not really necessary unless your bust size rivals Yaya Han’s (in which case, congratulations.) However, isolating the bust on its own pattern piece allows you to easily select your cup size from the pattern’s three available options.

The versatility of these pieces is one of the pattern’s main selling points. It’s convenient to have both a center front and center back seam to choose the placement of your zipper. However, unless you enjoy the aesthetic of having many seams, it will take some extra leg work to eliminate them (spoiler alert: neither the center front or center back panels can be cut on the fold straight out of the envelope).

The packaging states that the pattern is for use with two-way stretch knit fabric only. It’s written on every piece so that you can’t miss it. I suppose that this is intended to discourage the use of non-stretchy fabric moreso than four-way stretch fabric, because four-way stretch fabric will also work just fine if you’re prepared to make any corresponding fit adjustments. From an instructional standpoint, it’s more practical to identify a specific fabric type as a standard point of reference. For this pattern, the intended outcome is a two-way stretch bodysuit which stretches along the body’s length but not its width. For this reason, accurate fitting is crucial.

The pattern does not include instructions for fitting after construction. To be fair, the specifics of fitting a bodysuit vary widely based on the individual figure and the fabric used. In my particular case, the torso fit pretty well with only minor adjustments. However, the armscye was extremely large for my shoulder, while the legs were very small in both length and width. These types of fit issues can be completely different from person to person, so this is not a complaint about the pattern or a suggested alteration for the rest of you. Instead, I stress the importance of measuring your body ahead of time and making flat alterations to the paper pattern before cutting anything. It will save you a lot of time and cut fabric, particularly with a pattern which needs to be as closely fit as this one.

Once you’ve put in the work to customize it to your size, this pattern is as good as bodysuits get. It’s designed as a catch-all intended to be useful in the greatest possible number of situations. But that does not always make it the easiest or most straightforward base pattern for your specific situation. If your end goal is a complex, closely-fit bodysuit with many panels, this pattern will facilitate a more finely-tuned mockup than any other commercial pattern I’ve seen on the market. If you’re looking to make a very basic bodysuit with limited colors and seams, you can save yourself some time and effort by starting with a simpler base pattern.

Verdict: this is a good and useful bodysuit pattern, but not necessarily accessible to a beginner. If you are a competent seamstress who is willing to put in some time and several mockups to arrive at the perfect fit, this pattern is a fantastic starting point! But if you are inexperienced or intimidated by the thought of putting together a bodysuit, this pattern will not hold your hand. There are far simpler options on the market which are more suited for learning.

Finished up my baby Chandra cosplay. I’m pretty happy with it. Still need to hand embroider over the puffy paint but that will be for later. Haha. I’m ready to build some armor for a bit… And yes. Those are smoke machines in my little furnace.

Costume made and modeled by me!

@wizardsmagic