sea-monsters

Rating of PJO based on mentions of peanut butter
  • The Lightning Thief: 2 mentions. Nancy Bobofit throws peanut butter and ketchup sandwich pieces at Grover. Disgusting combination, used for a disgusting act. This book slanders the good name of peanut butter. 1/10
  • Sea of Monsters: 3 mentions. Percy buys Tyson an extra peanut butter sandwich at lunch one day. Percy also can't bring himself to look at Tyson's face bc he is distracted by peanut butter in his teeth. Finally, there are PB+J sandwiches aboard the CSS Birmingham. Good amount, sets up Tyson's continued love of peanut butter throughout the series. 8/10
  • The Titan's Curse: 2 mentions. Tyson thinks Annabeth is the coolest thing since peanut butter(and he really likes peanut butter). Peanut butter is not actually present in the scene, but it is acknowledged for being very cool. 6/10
  • Battle of the Labyrinth: 3 mentions. Tyson wants to relive the good old days when Annabeth, Percy, and he used to go on quests and eat peanut butter sandwiches. Later, Hera serves them all peanut butter sandwiches, which Tyson inhales. Although Tyson is incorrect in the amount of peanut butter sandwiches consumed in the Sea of Monsters, there are still a good amount of mentions. 9/10
  • The Last Olympian: 10 mentions. By far the most. May Castellan makes PB+J for a son that will never come home. This is very sad and makes me cry every time. On a lighter note, Tyson and the cyclopses use peanut butter as their battle cry, which Zeus finds odd. All in all, a robust amount of usages, all of which are very important to the plot. 27/10

Monster Musume, volume 10

Story and art by: OKAYADO
MSRP: $12.99
Release date: December 6, 2016

(MON)ster Girls Gone Wild!

When the members of the MON get suspended for accidentally zombifying a young girl (with an assist from Lala), Kimihito tries to console them by spending a full day on a date with each individual member. Not surprisingly, every date ends in its own unique flavor of disaster. From dodging ghost marriages to picnics gone wrong, Kimihito will be very glad indeed when MON’s suspension is over! Meanwhile, Draco learns a lesson in humility while trying to win back Miia’s favor. It’s more chaos and comedy in this MON-focused volume of everybody’s favorite monster girl series!

anonymous asked:

Who do you think is worse? Poseidon or Zeus? Lexi please

Okay, so let’s analyse the two’s behaviours by myths that I know. With the phrasing of this question, I’m going to analyse basically the ‘negative’ things they did - none of the positives - and possible justifications if I can think of any

Keep reading

It’s been a while since we checked in on how the Renaissance is doing with its ocean mysteries, so here is a marine biology update circa 1550.

Seals come in two forms:

Buff

& Triangular

Walruses are horrifying

But whales are worse

Fish can have human faces

but not always where you’d expect

As for the rest

… it’s probably better left alone.

[All images except chest face fish from Historiae animalium liber IV : De piscium & aquatilium animantium natura. Chest face fish from The noble lyfe & natures of man of bestes, serpentys, fowles & fisshes yt be moste knowen]

Slate presents an amazing, interactive digital version of Olaus Magnus’ 1539 Carta Marina, a chart that portrays the sea as teeming with monsters… 

When the chart was made, in the early years of the Age of Exploration, there was a lingering belief in the existence of griffins, unicorns, dragons, the phoenix, the monstrous races, and a host of other unnatural creatures. Modern science was in its infancy. Although adherents to the direct observation of nature would soon challenge hearsay and tradition and begin to classify animal life, at the time the medieval imagination was still free to shape its own forms of the natural world. The chart’s giant lobster gripping a swimmer in its claws, a monster being mistaken for an island, and a mast-high serpent devouring sailors would have represented actual fears of the unknown deep.

Those and Olaus’ other fanciful sea beasts are not mere decorations to fill empty spaces. Nor are they only visual metaphors for dangers lurking in the sea. Intended as representations of actual marine life, they are identified in the map’s key.

Click through to Slate to explore the stories of each creature, and read more on the chart’s origins… 

Olaus Magnus’ Carta Marina: Sea monsters on a gorgeous Renaissance map…

7

Medieval and Renaissance Sea Monsters from Maps

A visually stunning new book, Sea Monsters on Medieval and Renaissance Maps, covers a topic of history, that until now, has not been published in a comprehensive collection. The book’s author Chet Van Duzer, a Medieval and Renaissance map scholar, joined forces with the British Library, who published the book. The book’s jacket liner bests explains its content:

“The sea monsters on medieval and Renaissance maps are one of the most visually engaging elements, and yet they have never before been carefully studied. The subject is important not only in the history of cartography, art, and zoological illustration, but also in the history of the geography of the marvelous and of Western conceptions of the ocean. Moreover, the sea monsters depicted on maps can supply important insights into the sources, influences, and methods of the cartographers who drew or painted them.”
{Book jacket liner notes 2013 ©The British Library}

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