sea surface temperatures

“Electric jungle”, taken in the heart of the rainforest in Brazil by Christian Spencer, is one of the winning photos of the World Meteorological Organization’s photo contest.

The theme of the contest – ““Hotter, drier, wetter. Face the Future” – was chosen to illustrate the reality of climate change. As a result of heat-trapping greenhouse gases in our atmosphere, land and sea surface temperatures are rising. The frequency and intensity of extreme events like heatwaves and heavy rainfall is increasing. Without urgent action to cut carbon dioxide emissions, this trend will accelerate.

2

When viewed in just the right way, Earth is covered in swirling brushstrokes that put Van Gogh’s most famous works to shame. Differences in temperature and pressure, friction and other phenomena cause fluids like water in the ocean and air in the atmosphere to move in mesmerizing patterns. Sometimes it just takes a supercomputer to see the dance. 

These images represent the next generation of ocean current models that reveal some of the hidden action. Produced by the Department of Energy’s Los Alamos National Lab, the top image shows Atlantic Ocean water surface temperatures and the bottom illustrates the Southern Ocean’s currents and eddies flowing eastward around Antarctica. 

Both are part of the lab’s Climate, Ocean and Sea Ice Modeling program to project global alterations to the planet from climate change using the most advanced technologies and methods. Models were built using a supercomputer that operates 8,000 processors simultaneously and verified against real-world satellite and shipboard observations. 

Keep reading

“Airliner and Sun”, a winning photo from the World Meteorological Organization’s Calendar Photo Contest. It was taken in France by Sebastien Lebrigand.

“Ice Dragon”, another winning photo, taken in Slovenia by Marko Korosec.

The theme of the contest – ““Hotter, drier, wetter. Face the Future” – was chosen to illustrate the reality of climate change. As a result of heat-trapping greenhouse gases in our atmosphere, land and sea surface temperatures are rising. The frequency and intensity of extreme events like heatwaves and heavy rainfall is increasing. Without urgent action to cut carbon dioxide emissions, this trend will accelerate.