independent.co.uk
Pacific Islands could lose 80 per cent of their fish because of climate change
Pacific Island nations could lose as much as 80 per cent of their fish by the end of the century, as climate change causes species to go extinct, a new study warned.

The region is “projected to become warmer, less oxygenated, more acidic, and have lower production of plankton that form the base of oceanic food webs,”  


After visiting Fiji and witnessing first hand how climate change and rising sea levels are affecting how locals live, it is said to see that these people who live sustainably off the land will suffer the most. When the men in the village leave at 5 in the morning to go fishing and catch maybe one or two big fish to sell or feed their families, its not fair that their environment is the one becoming the most affected by ocean changes while other parts of the world continue to exploit ocean resources. 


flickr

Dolphin Duo by Mark Chandler
Via Flickr:
Taken from the ‘Sanibel Thriller’ off the coast of Sanibel Island, FL.

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The Okeanos Explorer has discovered a very cute octopus at a depth of 4,290 metres.

This is the deepest an octopus of this particular sub order of octopus has ever been seen. 

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration noted this is a completely unsubscribed species and perhaps not belonging to any specific genus. Highlighting how little we still know about the creatures in the depths of our oceans.

(Ocean Explorer)