sea garbage

Someone: “Hey where do keep your garbage can?”

Me: *presses play on an old cassette tape of The Little Mermaid*

Under the sink! 
Under the sink! 
If you want to trash it, that’s where we stash it 
Under the sink!

Someone: “…”

Someone: *sigh* “I can never un-hear that, you know…”

Big Lessons From Finding Dory

So I saw Finding Dory tonight and let me just highlight a few things that are very important that were shown in the movie but may have gone over other’s heads (none of these are spoilers, really but im tagging them anyways):

1. Not all marine life institutions are like SeaWorld. This film demonstrates there are a lot of really helpful marine life institutions out there who are dedicated to the rescue and rehabilitation of animals. It takes place in California and although they never directly call it the Monterey Bay Aquarium you can tell that is what it is based off of. Many aquariums like the one in Monterey and a local aquarium by me are completely dedicated to the rehabilitation of marine life/mammals and yes, they tag some animals, but it is just to track their migration patterns and conduct research. SeaWorld has given such a bad name to other marine life centers out there and to be honest, these centers are the kind of organizations we need to preserve our marine life. Most operate on a vast network of volunteers and they could really use your donations–especially when it is apparent that our government does not care about our waters to make any laws protecting it.

2. PAY VERY CLOSE ATTENTION TO THE FINAL SCENE. (The one where Dory says the view before her is “unforgettable”). If you’ve seen the movie, you might have noticed something….well missing. In fact, a lot was missing. Much of the coral reef in this scene as they pan out has become discolored and is dead. Pixar clearly wanted to draw your eye to this scene. Our coral reefs are dramatically dying and if we don’t stop to care for them now, they can be gone easily in a lifetime–as little as 15 years. Those beautiful views will become forgettable if we do not do something about them now. Back when Finding Nemo came out 12 years ago, scientists were just starting to notice the dramatic changes in iur coral reefs. Now if you see recent pictures of the Sydney Harbor, the same one featured in FN, most of those beautiful colorful corl reefs are dead and gone. Although Finding Dory is supposed to take place one year after Finding Nemo, Pixar was really trying to bring that important message out.

So please, keep in mind as you spend money towards a movie ticket, maybe next time use that money and donate to ocean conservation funds. We really do only get one world, and she takes care of us so we should take care of her.

anonymous asked:

you're a grown ass woman and you love drama so much i'm sobbing like just let it go dude let it go

Most people don’t mind killing cows and chickens… but they’d probably have a hard time killing chimpanzees, the primary reason being that they can draw pictures. Suppose fish were able to draw pictures…

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Sea Soup: Mandy Barker’s Photo Collages of Ocean Trash

Scientists have informally dubbed the discarded human waste accumulating in our oceans with a number of names: “soup,” “trash vortex,” and most nobly, the “Great Pacific garbage patch.” The last term makes particular reference to the exceptionally high relative concentrations of pelagic plastics, chemical sludge and other debris that have been trapped by the currents of the North Pacific Gyre, one of the five major oceanic gyres on the planet. Gyres, large systems of rotating ocean currents, are the largest ecosystems in the world and, more recently, ground zero for massive accretions of plastic trash. In researching this phenomenon, UK photographer Mandy Barker developed a series of images entitled ‘Soup’ which depicts these plastics and discarded items salvaged from beaches around the world. Presented in beautifully precise, color-coded arrangements, the collected objects appear as a taxonomy of unique species in a toxic “ecosystem.” The images also underscore the longevity of even the tiniest pieces of trash: though haphazardly discarded and forgotten, they form an ever-growing environmental issue. Barker’s project, by bringing a seemingly remote subject into clear view, compels us to address this elephant in the room.