screen costumes

3

We’ve been in the madness for a month now and we still weren’t ready for it.

• Otabek by Convallaria Cosplay (FB, IG)
• Yuri by Anae Cosplay (FB, IG)
• Photo by Elderx Photography (FB)

Find us on IG with #TheActualSkatingGays

Disclaimer: These pics were taken two weeks after the pv came out and since there was very little of Otabek on the screen, his costume is based on his Worlds Gala costume from the YOI calendar

Oscars 2017 Complete Winners List

Best picture:  Moonlight

Best actor: Casey Affleck (Manchester by the Sea)

Best supporting actor:  Mahershala Ali (Moonlight)

Best actress:  Emma Stone (La La Land)

Best supporting actress: Viola Davis (Fences)

Best director:  Kenneth Lonergan (Manchester by the Sea)

Best original screenplay:  Manchester by the Sea

Best adapted screenplay: Moonlight 

Best live-action short: Sing

Best documentary short:  The White Helmets

Best documentary:  OJ: Made in America

Best foreign language film: The Salesman 

Best animated feature: Zootopia 

Best animated short: Piper 

Best cinematography: La La Land 

Best production design: La La Land 

Best score: La La Land 

Best song:  City of Stars (La La Land)

Best visual effects: The Jungle Book 

Best film editing: Hacksaw Ridge 

Best sound editing:  Arrival

Best sound mixing:  Hacksaw Ridge

Best makeup and hairstyling: Suicide Squad

Best costume designFantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them

harpersbazaar.com
Dan Stevens on the "Terrifying" Pressure of 'Beauty and the Beast'
The 'Legion' star and former 'Downton Abbey' heartthrob on taking on one of Disney's most famous princes.

DAN STEVENS ON THE “TERRIFYING” PRESSURE OF ‘BEAUTY AND THE BEAST’

In case you didn’t notice, Disney’s live-action Beauty and the Beast remake is currently the biggest movie in the world, having smashed five box-office records during its opening weekend alone. You can thank Dan Stevens in part for the film’s massive success; the Downton Abbey alum took on arguably the movie’s most challenging role, bringing the lovelorn, misunderstood Beast to life through a motion-capture suit and prosthetics. It’s a stark departure from his starring turn as X-Men mutant David Haller in FX’s new smash-hit series Legion, which received its Season 2 order last week. “To get to explore fantastical realms has always been a dream of mine, so long may it continue,” Stevens says of his current penchant for less-than-human roles. Below, the actor opens up about the “extreme excitement and mild terror” of taking on one of Disney’s most iconic roles, creating the voice of the Beast and developing his back story.

He admits he was “terrified” when he was cast in the role.

“It was a mixture of extreme excitement and mild terror. It’s a huge honor to be asked to play an iconic role like this. It’s a privilege. I guess the biggest responsibility I felt was to my childhood self, really, who loved this fairytale, loved fairytales in general, and loved the animated film. Then it was to my own kids. I tried not to think about all the millions of other kids that would be seeing it. Just my own, and thinking about the ways in which they enjoy the book when we read it to them, and the things in the animated film that made them laugh, and trying to retain those things.”

There were several moments throughout the filmmaking process where he questioned if he’d be able to pull off a convincing Beast.

“That question was going on throughout pre-production, really. We were exploring a couple of different ways that we might [create the Beast], so I was exploring prosthetic options, and the muscle suit was being constructed for the mass and hulk of the Beast, so I was getting to explore moving around with that on. The stilts were being modified almost daily. We’d have a meeting in the morning with a team of engineers and the choreographers, and we’d try and modify these things so I could waltz in them effectively. It wasn’t so comfortable, but definitely in a way that wasn’t going to completely cripple me. With the dance training, getting those steps down, but then getting them down in the stilts… Every day I woke up thinking, "How are we going to do this?” I continued to probably think that throughout the post[-production] process as well. The first cut of the film, the first rough assembly that Bill showed me of the movie—which was gorgeous, by the way—had me still in my Lycra suit. There was no CGI rendered at all, so the performance was there, but I had to just draw on untold resources of imagination to believe and will the Beast into being.“

Besides the Beast’s appearance, very little in the film actually used a green screen—which helped Stevens and the rest of the cast make the world of Beauty and the Beast believable.

What [director] Bill [Condon] really wanted, from the very beginning, was in order to have a world in which you have these fantastical beasts that we’re creating using technology, everything else had to feel and look real. There wasn’t a lot of green screen. The costumes and the props, and Sarah Greenwood’s production design, were intentionally practical and gorgeous. The ballroom was 360 degrees of gorgeousness. It was vast, and that area of the castle, going from the terrace outside the ballroom, through the ballroom into the hallway, around by the fireside and in through to the kitchen and the dining room, that was all one giant set. It was two massive hangars worth of set, and it would take about five minutes to walk through from one end to the other. In that sense, it felt about as real as it could. I would lumber in in this giant, gray motion capture muscle suit and feel pretty monstrous.”

Stevens’s voice wasn’t really modified to play the Beast.

“That was actually my voice. I guess they work up the bass a little bit, but no, it was something that came out of a prosthetic exploration. They made these incredible fangs for me, so I could go away and wear those for a few hours a day and figure out how he was going to talk. I started looking at how the very vain character that you see in the beginning of the movie would try and hide these fangs when he’s been cursed with these monstrous teeth. He ends up with a kind of downturned mouth, but he can still talk out of the front of his mouth and hide the fangs. On top of which, he’s a very grumpy man. He’s been stuck in this lonely tower for ten years. It’s sort of this downturned mouth thing that probably stretched the larynx, and I thought, that’s interesting. I could pursue that and have him talk more out of the bottom of his mouth, and this incredibly grumpy, dry character started to emerge.”

He did his own singing, too.

“I had an incredible voice coach. First of all, my wife, who coached me for the audition, and Ann-Marie Speed, who teaches at the Royal Academy of Music in London. [She] really got me to engage with the musculature of the voice in the same way that I was engaging my body physically to puppeteer the Beast, and to dance and do all the physical prep. [She helped me] get to grips with my voice in a new way, both to speak as the Beast, but also sing as the Beast.”

He hopes audiences pick up on the subtle changes that set the new movie apart from the original.

“You see a little bit of the Prince’s back story. You see the kind of parties he used to hold before he was cursed, and telling a bit of his back story through dance. This kind of speed-waltzing that we see at the beginning, where he’s dancing with 60 princesses—he doesn’t particularly connect to any of them.

And then obviously you’ve got that lovely celebration at the end, winter turning to spring—I think that was a new verse. They discovered some of Howard Ashman’s notes or some of Howard and Alan [Menken]’s notes, and they discovered a new verse that hadn’t been used in the original Beauty and the Beast song. I’m going to get it wildly wrong now, but I think it’s "Winter turns to spring, famine turns to feast. Nature points the way, nothing left to say. Beauty and the Beast.” That’s not in the original. It’s still the same beautiful tune, but I guess it’s telling of the whole story, really, that it’s the same tune, the same melodies, but sung in a slightly different way, which make [the songs] classics, which make them timeless. It is also a lovely verse. It’s a lovely sentiment to go out on.“

I wore my Springtrap costume to work today because they were having a costume contest (though I was really the only one who dressed up at all from what I saw), and during my dinner break I ended up doodling the entire break… Resulting in Springtrap-the intern.

10

Revenge of the Sith | Behind the Scenes | You got a suit? Suit up! 

The Darth Vader mask for Revenge of the Sith was rebuilt from scratch, using a new digital design to computer-lathe the base master, from which molds were made to cast the on-screen costume masks. The resulting masks are, for the first time in Star Wars history, truly symmetrical.

“The breath? The breath! I got them to… the guy who made the costume (Ivo Coveney), I got him to make a little voice box, or asked him if he could and he was kind enough to oblige. He made a little breathing apparatus, so I could flip a switch and I would get the full effect of the Darth Vader breathing when I walked on the set for the first time.” - Hayden Christensen

On September 1, 2003, late in the afternoon, the Episode III production descended on Stage 4, where the minimal set of the rehabilitation center was built with just a table on a raised platform. With a crowd gathering to witness Darth Vader’s return and Hayden Christensen getting dressed in a specially set-up wardrobe tent next to the set which had been constructed as a makeshift dressing room because Hayden in his Vader costume couldn’t walk very far. Everything was going according to plan when Lucas realized that they never thought to make cuffs for the ankles. Using bits of a nearby sprinkler system, Ivo Coveney (the Costume Props Supervisor) was able to deliver the ankle cuffs in 20 minutes, just in time for filming. After arriving on set to loud applause, Hayden and the crew filmed the transformation. In one of the takes, the face plate of the mask was lowered onto Hayden’s face by a crew member using a pole.

illustration for an exhibition we participating in in college. The brief was to draw something that influenced you from your childhood and I chose wrestling as it’s all I watched as a kid. I made the drawing really rough compared to my other stuff to kind of look like how i used to draw as a kid with scribbly lines and colours. So wrestling influenced me greatly in my early days. I was always in love with the characters i saw on screen and their costumes and personalities and always wanted to make my own characters like them. The performance art that is wrestling lead to me getting so many ideas for drawings at a young age and to be starting my own wrestling journey now shows how this part of my childhood is extremely held dearly to me. Now before anyone says they dont looks spot on like the wrestlers again the style was to mimick the childlike way i drew hence why their faces are so rough