scott-pilgrim-end

anonymous asked:

hey, i really liked your meta about kaneki stealing everyone's girls (lol). i liked your point about how kaneki's "emptiness" allows people to project their feelings onto him. touka is one of the only characters to consistently call kaneki out on his shit, but she's in also in love with him and stays unwaveringly at his side. what do you think makes touken work vs. those other relationships? why does touka still love kaneki despite being aware of his "emptiness"?

I could answer this in a long meta, and I will get around to writing a “why Touka and Kaneki are intended as love interests from the beginning and they suit each other so well” meta eventually, but I feel like this answer actually has a simple  and poetic response so I’m going to try to leave it at that. 

Basically, Touka and Kaneki both have entirely similiar traumas, they were both left behind by a parent and feel intentionally unchosen. They both have complexes about losing all the people in their lives. They both feel abandoned. They are so similiar, and they let their trauma define them to such an extent that they can mutually understand the other better than most other characters in the series.

Even though there are like a billion characters that foil Kaneki, nobody really alligns with him as complementary as Touka in a way that Touka can understand him.

If anything I would compare it to Scott Pilgrim. At the end of the comic, the characters around Scott basically concluded that all of Scott’s interests, the one he’s best for is Ramona because they “deserve each other.”

Movies with Mikey puts it in a slightly less mean way though “Scott doesn’t want to make a decision in the whole movie (cough antihero)…. it’s kind of obvious that Ramona realizes this from the start, but she still just kind of puts up with it which is kind of weird when you think about it. Until you realize that they’re drawn to each other, because they make a lot of the same mistakes. Like having super famous exes. It’s like a mirror, it’s like duality, that’s a word.”

Which pretty heavily in itself mirrors this scene where Touka knows that Kaneki is lying to her but puts up with it, and acts in a way that is able to lead him to his decision instead without having to confront him about it. 

Touka understands Kaneki’s want to not confront things because she herself, also does not want to confront certain things. She knows why Kaneki kept the secret from her, because she herself was keeping a secret of her own.

It’s like a mirror, it’s like duality… that’s a word. 

All of the characters who have unrequited love for Kaneki also put him above them somehow on a pedestal. Mutsuki calls him Sensei, Tsukiyama calls himself a servant or knight of Kaneki, Hinami believes Kaneki and Touka to be on a pedestal of people she wants to be like.

Kaneki and Touka however, are equals in both strengths and flaws. 

Baby Driver review

Edgar Wright can do no wrong. This may seem like a horrible pun, and it is, but after seeing his latest cinematic offering, Baby Driver, I think it’s a pretty safe thing to say. Shaun of the Dead, Hot Fuzz, The World’s End, Scott Pilgrim vs. the World, and now Baby Driver… the man just seems incapable of disappointing with his films. This film was still a risky move for Edgar Wright; the man is known mostly for comedic films, or at least films where comedy is a huge selling point. Scot Pilgrim and Hot Fuzz are both action-comedies, whereas Baby Driver is more of an action crime thriller with comedic elements (hey, Wright’s not just gonna drop his signature style, is he?). It is also a low budget film where Wright insisted all the stunts and driving be done with practical effects rather than CGI, and it was originally going to be tossed in August, which is a dump month for… but after being screened at South By Southwest and receiving critical acclaim up the wazoo, it was pushed on up to June. The riskiness of jumping into another genre paid off, because Baby Driver made up its production budget its opening weekend and is still going strong!

In short, this movie is a massive sleeper hit, and for very good reason: it’s fantastic, stylish, exhilarating, and populated by some of the finest actors playing the most intriguing characters in a crime film since The Usual Suspects or GoodFellas. So what story could produce characters so good? Well, let me tell you! The story centers on a young man known only as “Baby.” Baby is the getaway driver for a criminal kingpin known as Doc, who has a gang of bank robbers he sends out to commit crimes. Baby is a kid with a tragic past, as an accident claimed his mother’s life and gave him tinnitus, which is why he constantly listens to an iPod at all times. One day, he meets a lovely young waitress named Deborah, and the two soon fall in love… and now Baby finally has a reason to leave the criminal world behind after his last job. But things never turn out so easy, do they?

Keep reading

Black Sheep
The Clash at Demonhead
Black Sheep

I’ve already posted a song from the Scott Pilgrim Soundtrack, but it’s just that good! I listen to it at least once a week, it’s a nice eclectic mix. I love this song Black Sheep. It’s actually a Metric song, but I prefer the movie-version as sung by Brie Larson (aka Envy Adams of The Clash at Demonhead) because she’s pretty awesome.

“Hello again, friend of a friend, I knew you when
Our common goal was waiting for the world to end.”

Here are all 322 new members of The Academy:

Actors
Elizabeth Banks – “Love & Mercy,” “The Hunger Games”
Choi Min-sik– “Lucy,” “Oldboy”
Benedict Cumberbatch – “The Imitation Game,” “Star Trek Into Darkness”
Martin Freeman – “The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey,” “Hot Fuzz”
Heather Graham – “The Hangover,” “Boogie Nights”
Tom Hardy – “Mad Max: Fury Road,” “Inception”
Kevin Hart – “The Wedding Ringer,” “Ride Along”
Felicity Jones – “The Theory of Everything,” “Like Crazy”
Stephen Lang – “Avatar,” “The Men Who Stare at Goats”
Jodi Long – “A Picture of You,” “Beginners”
John Carroll Lynch – “Shutter Island,” “Zodiac”
Gugu Mbatha-Raw – “Beyond the Lights,” “Belle”
Denis O’Hare – “Milk,” “Michael Clayton”
Michael O’Neill – “Dallas Buyers Club,” “Transformers”
David Oyelowo – “Selma,” “A Most Violent Year”
Dev Patel – “The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel,” “Slumdog Millionaire”
Rosamund Pike – “Gone Girl,” “Pride & Prejudice”
Chris Pine – “Into the Woods,” “Star Trek”
Daniel Radcliffe – “Kill Your Darlings,” “Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows Part 2”
Eddie Redmayne – “The Theory of Everything,” “Les Misérables”
Jason Segel – “The Five-Year Engagement,” “The Muppets”
J.K. Simmons – “Whiplash,” “Juno”
Sonny Skyhawk – “Geronimo: An American Legend,” “Young Guns II”
Song Kang-ho – “Snowpiercer,” “The Host”
Emma Stone – “Birdman or (The Unexpected Virtue of Ignorance),” “The Help”

Keep reading

THE ACADEMY INVITES 322 TO MEMBERSHIP


Actors
Elizabeth Banks – “Love & Mercy,” “The Hunger Games”
Choi Min-sik– “Lucy,” “Oldboy”
Benedict Cumberbatch – “The Imitation Game,” “Star Trek Into Darkness”
Martin Freeman – “The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey,” “Hot Fuzz”
Heather Graham – “The Hangover,” “Boogie Nights”
Tom Hardy – “Mad Max: Fury Road,” “Inception”
Kevin Hart – “The Wedding Ringer,” “Ride Along”
Felicity Jones – “The Theory of Everything,” “Like Crazy”
Stephen Lang – “Avatar,” “The Men Who Stare at Goats”
Jodi Long – “A Picture of You,” “Beginners”
John Carroll Lynch – “Shutter Island,” “Zodiac”
Gugu Mbatha-Raw – “Beyond the Lights,” “Belle”
Denis O’Hare – “Milk,” “Michael Clayton”
Michael O’Neill – “Dallas Buyers Club,” “Transformers”
David Oyelowo – “Selma,” “A Most Violent Year”
Dev Patel – “The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel,” “Slumdog Millionaire”
Rosamund Pike – “Gone Girl,” “Pride & Prejudice”
Chris Pine – “Into the Woods,” “Star Trek”
Daniel Radcliffe – “Kill Your Darlings,” “Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows Part 2”
Eddie Redmayne – “The Theory of Everything,” “Les Misérables”
Jason Segel – “The Five-Year Engagement,” “The Muppets”
J.K. Simmons – “Whiplash,” “Juno”
Sonny Skyhawk – “Geronimo: An American Legend,” “Young Guns II”
Song Kang-ho – “Snowpiercer,” “The Host”
Emma Stone – “Birdman or (The Unexpected Virtue of Ignorance),” “The Help”

Many more after the jump

Keep reading

KINGSMAN: THE SECRET SERVICE is insanely ludicrous, crazily fun, impossibly british (more than Bond has ever dreamt to be) and one of the most ultra-violent films I have ever seen (there is a jaw-dropping sequence in a church set to “Freebird” that is now on the Mount Rushmore of movie incredibleness and the final act is the most bonkers thing I’ve ever witnessed). I have never been more in love with anything ever. It’s very tongue-in-cheek and is a fantastic send up of all the Roger Moore Bond films (but with A LOT more balls). 

The entire cast is perfection: Colin Firth is aces and spot-on as the unflappable spy; Taron Egerton is a real find whose transformation from street thug to super spy is outstanding; Mark Strong is amazing, playing against type, as the Kingsman version of Q; Samuel L. Jackson makes for a fantastic villain with a sexy henchwoman to boot. The action sequences are INSANE with crazy/complex choreography showcasing the actors doing their own stunts which is AWESOME (much like what Edgar Wright did with Scott Pilgrim and The World’s End respectfully, but much loonier). 

 This is Matthew Vaughn’s best film to date and since he always outdoes himself I can’t wait to see what he has in store next (don’t you love having things to look forward to). It’s unfathomably entertaining and brings large-scale blockbuster action but with style and attitude that you rarely see from them. I demand this become a franchise and gives me at least a half-dozen more of this madness. The first must-see film of the year and it has me giddy like a schoolgirl…I couldn’t be happier.