sciences are hard

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3/1/17 9:32 AM // studying physics and SAT stuff this morning in my second study space I arranged yesterday. It has absolutely nothing around it, just a table, and I have to carry the things I need from my study room. So far it’s proven to be effective for maximizing concentration, maybe you could try it :)

The many different ways of writing “Charcoal”

Im working on categorizing materials in the lab (aka going through tagged excavation material and putting it in our database) and I encountered a phenomena of fellow Israeli archaeology students who find the word “charcoal” enigmatic and just cant for the life of them write it correctly. This is WAY too funny to keep to myself so enjoy a compilation of archaeologists who cannot correctly english the word “charcoal” (black boxes of death cover up excavation details):

sharcoal? sharcool? who knows

CHAROCAL

Charcls. 

Chacroal. SO CLOSE

Charcals?

chorhole?? chorkhale?

yeah, “carbon”

dude just gave up

shakls???

charcoale, fancy charcoal

??????

Charcleul?

charcls. many many charcls. As opposed to:

a SINGLE charcal.

And my all time favorites:

fucking SHRSOAL

its A SNEL. A SNEL

Youre welcome.

I pray we all find jobs after graduation.

Between volunteering, interning, working full time, going to school full time…these 4 years have flown by so fast. I know i’m not the only one with the same story, but with May literally around the corner I can’t help but begin to get nervous. We’ve all heard the post-graduation job search stories, I pray we don’t become part of that narrative.  Especially those of us in the social sciences…it’ll be hard but I hope luck favors us all.

Writing Science Fiction: Tips for Beginners

We’ve seen a lot of science fiction stories over the past year or so. It’s not like they sci-fi ever went out of style, but it seems to be gaining popularity recently.

For some, writing science fiction might seem like a daunting genre to break into. Do you need to know complex mathematical equations? Do you need to know exactly how space travel works? Did you need to major in astrophysics?

Sure, those things don’t hurt, but they’re absolutely not necessary. You can write a great sci-fi novel without years of research. And you can tell a really interesting story, even if you’re not a science pro.

Here are a few tips to get started:

Consider ‘What-if’ Scenarios

This isn’t just a great rule for sci-fi novels, but I think the best ones use this approach. Start off with a simple what-if scenario. For example: what if we lived on a world made of ice? What if in this particular world only consisted of women? Obviously, you’ll need to expand on those scenarios and spend time really developing what those caveats would mean, but you get the idea.

Start with a small what-if scenario and brainstorm!

Figure Out Your Rules

I don’t think writing great sci-fi depends on being 100% scientifically accurate ALL THE TIME, but I do think you need to stick to your own rules. Whatever is a hard rule for your own universe, it’s important to keep it that way. Does your world have ships that can travel quickly from planet to planet? Sure, that’s great! Figure out your own rules for space travel and develop your world. How do the inhabitants on one planet act/grow/eat/interact compared to the inhabitants of another? Spend time developing these ideas!

No Info Dumps!

Sometimes when people write science fiction, they tend to explain their universe all in one big info-dump. Don’t. This is boring and it does nothing to serve your story. Slowly reveal information. Every plot point in your story should serve a purpose. Develop your characters through the action and show off your worlds through them. Get creative.

Keep it Vague

If you’re unsure about the science of something, write to your strengths. Don’t understand how space travel works? Maybe your MC is put to sleep during a long trip. This is just one example, but try to figure out a way to make it work for you. Maybe avoid space travel altogether if it doesn’t serve your story.

Listen, this isn’t a substitute for research, but I also don’t want you to avoid writing science fiction if you just don’t get a lot of the concepts involved. If you’ve got a great idea for a story, work it out to fit your style. Science fiction is a great platform for unique and compelling character studies, so don’t get scared off! You don’t have to write hard science fiction in order to write a good novel.

-Kris Noel

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Goodnight, Captain
(AKA vague prequel to this)

Where freshly minted Captain Kirk reads up on stuff even when he’s not on shift and nods off in random conference rooms on the Enterprise. Certain first officers who don’t require as much sleep take care of things.

trek

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ime bi people’s m/f relationships look Really Different from relationships between two straight people because bi folks have usually done a lot more questioning of heteropatriarchy and the Standard Straight Relationship Script. so like, for the most part, we handle gender roles differently, we handle sex differently (idk about hard science but I’ve read and heard a ton of anecdotes about bi folks being way less invested in piv than straight folks), we conduct our relationships in ways that work for us rather than conforming to the default heteronormative narrative b/c most of us have realized that that’s not the only option.

and the statistics from the CDC, the ones that reveal that bi men and women experience more intimate partner violence than straight or gay people in their gender groups, the ones that reveal that perpetrators of ipv against bi people are largely of the “opposite” gender…I think those do a lot to confirm that bi folks conduct their m/f relationships a lot differently than straight people, and are punished for it by straight partners who want them to conform to heteronormativity.

so please, please don’t dismiss these very significant differences by claiming that our m/f relationships are het/straight relationships or that we’re “het partnered” or anything else to imply that we’re the same as straight people in certain contexts because we’re really not.