science thursday

The fruits of my labour today. Took me four and a bit hours to make this figure for an upcoming paper. Names and specimen numbers have been redacted to stop cheeky blighters nicking our research, obvs. Scale bars indicate 1 mm.

My Best Friend is the School’s Bad Boy(Luke Hemmings)

Requested by Anon

All my posts

Luke walks down the hall, hard look on his face. His tattoo covered body was what drawed a lot of attention towards him, not that Luke minded. He smelt a bit like cigarettes, having just smoked one before class, and the freshmen that saw him had already told half the school.

He opens his locker, removing the dark sunglasses off his face, and tucking them on the collar of his shirt. “Hey, Luke,” you grin leaning on the locker next to his.

“Hey, Y/N,” he gives you a soft smile.

“So, the new Fast and Furious comes out this week, and I already got us tickets.”

Luke chuckles a bit, “When?”

“Friday, a little before nine,” you answer. “We could get something to eat before,” you offer. “Pizza at Leo’s?” He smirks, knowing full and well that that’s what you would want to eat, and that you’d probably hate eating anywhere.

“Great,” you grin. He shuts his locker, swinging his arm over your shoulder, walking towards you locker. “So, rumors true? Were you smoking outside?”

He sighs, “Y/N.”

“You promised,” you frown at him.

“I promised I’d try,” he corrects.

“Luke,” you pout. “I don’t want to lose you to lung cancer, please, will you get better? For me?”

He sighs again, “Fine, for you.” He grins watching as you clap your hands with a smile on your face.

“Give me the pack,” you hold your hand out.

Luke complies, taking the new pack from his back pocket, and slapping it into your palm. You toss it in the trash as you near your locker. “So, you wanna spend the night after the movie?” You turn the combination on your locker. Luke has been sneaking into your house for awhile now, and he often spent the night. Luke helped with your nightmares, which you get rather frequently. “Have they gotten worse?”

“They aren’t as often, but they aren’t getting better.” You grab your textbook.

“I’ll be there,” he smiles.

“Mr. Hemmings.” You both turn to see the principle standing there. “My office, now.”

“Yes, sir.”


“What happened?” You asked later at lunch. You both sat alone most days, but sometimes some of Luke’s friends would join. Michael, Calum, and Ashton were just like Luke. Four very misunderstood nice guys. Today they had a different lunch period, so that meant you two were alone.

“Well let’s just say you did good taking the pack,” he says.

“Those freshmen really work fast.”

“It’s uncanny,” he comments.

A few minutes later, you’re approached by a girl in your grade. “Are you guys dating?” She asks, timidly.

“Is that your business?” Luke asks. He wasn’t trying to be mean, but he didn’t like when people would spread rumors about you. You were one of the few people he considered family.

“Luke,” you scold. “No we aren’t dating, why?”

“Some people were talking, and-”

“Who?” Luke cuts her off, and she cowers back a bit.

“Luke,” you give him a look. “It’s fine.” You give her a soft smile, “Don’t worry about him, but no. He’s like my brother,” you shrug.

“Oh,” she seemed surprised. “Really? Cause you guys seem-”

“We’re not, okay? Now leave,” Luke says. The girl hurries off, rushing back to her friends.

“You didn’t have to be such an ass,” you comment.

“I’m gonna kill them,” he grumbles. “Why were they talking about you? They should know better than to-”

“Luke,” you smile, “It’s okay. It’s high school, it’s normal for people to talk. You can’t protect me from everything.”

“I sure as hell can, and I will.”

“Luke, they’ll suspend you if you get in another fight. Just leave it alone, please,” you plead.

“Fine, whatever,” he rolls his eyes.

“Perfect, now I’m coming over to help you study for the science test on Thursday.”

“We have a test?”

“And that’s why I’m coming over.”

Girls in the first few years of elementary school are less likely than boys to say that their own gender is “really, really smart,” and less likely to opt into a game described as being for super-smart kids, research finds.

The study, which appears Thursday in Science, comes amid a push to figure out why women are underrepresented in science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM, fields. One line of research involves stereotypes, and how they might influence academic and career choices.

Andrei Cimpian, a professor of psychology at New York University and an author of the study, says his lab’s previous work showed that women were particularly underrepresented in both STEM and humanities fields whose members thought you needed to be brilliant — that is, to have innate talent — to succeed.

“You might think these stereotypes start in college, but we know from a lot of developmental work that children are incredibly attuned to social signals,” Cimpian says. So they decided to look at kids from ages 5 to 7, the period during which stereotypes seem to start to take hold.

Young Girls Are Less Apt To Think That Women Are Really, Really Smart

Photo: Marc Romanelli/Getty Images/Blend Images

Throwback Thursday: This cover from November 1955 is incredibly prescient as Adrienne LaFrance covers the recent discovery of the three moons that belong to an enormous planet in a far-off constellation, Centaurus. Read the excerpt below from “Astronomers Just Found a Mega-Planet With Three Suns:”

HD 131399Ab isn’t the first planet found to have three suns. But it is the first such planet to be found in a wide-orbit system—​by far the widest known within a multi-star system. This is weird because multi-star systems are usually so unstable that they ejects planets, ​which are subject to competing gravitation force from all those suns.​This particular planet’s unexpected survival is therefore peculiar, and perhaps revealing. It could mean that such systems are more commonly hosts to planets that scientists tend to think, according to a paperpublished in the journal Science on Thursday.