science in life

A note on Vibration and Washing Machines

If you have taken a sneak peak into a washing machine then you might have noticed that it has a concrete block inside (also why they are heavy).

Their primary purpose is to absorb vibrations caused by the rotating body (in this case the drum) and keep the machine stable.

But this begs the question of what would happen if it didn’t have the concrete dampener. The above gif from the secret life of machines shows you exactly that.

With no cushion to dampen out the vibration, the machine propels forward from the unbalanced linear and torsional forces and eventually breaks down.

Have a great day!

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Balancing of rotating masses

listen up, kids, sky’s here to tell you something:

it’s okay to have interests that you don’t necessarily want to pursue at a higher level even if your parents think otherwise/think it isn’t ‘worth so much time’

so, you wanna write a book, but you don’t wanna get a degree in english literature? go for it! you wanna get a chemistry set and blow up some shit and learn from it, but you don’t wanna be a chemist? go the fuck ahead! you wanna figure out what the binomial theorem is at the age of thirteen, but you don’t wanna become a maths professor? by all means, knock yourself out!

you can learn from a whole range of different things, but that doesn’t mean you have to make it your life’s work or get a degree in it.

you’re young, you’re curious. try new things. dabble in different areas. it doesn’t matter if you have sixteen things you like doing, or just six. it’s all okay.

4

Victoria LaBarre was climbing out of a canyon and into a bright, vast, seemingly lifeless landscape when she started to experience an astronaut’s nightmare.

“Suddenly,” she said, “I couldn’t breathe.”

The symptoms were real — maybe from claustrophobia, or from exertion at high altitude. But LaBarre didn’t unlatch her helmet to get a breath of fresh air because, in this simulated Mars exercise in the Utah desert, she was supposed to be an astronaut. The canyon was standing in for Candor Chasma, a 5-mile-deep gash in the Red Planet’s surface. On Mars, there’s no oxygen in the air — you do not take off your helmet.

So, instead, LaBarre radioed for help from fellow members of Crew 177. The team of students and teachers from a Texas community college had applied together to live and work for a week this spring in a two-story metal cylinder at the privately run Mars Desert Research Station near Hanksville, Utah.

Elijah Espinoza, a freshman assigned to be a crew engineer and geologist for the week, heard LaBarre’s call and walked her through some breathing exercises.

“I think that’s really one of the best things about Mars — the teamwork,” said LaBarre.“I don’t think you could live without it.”

To Prepare For Mars Settlement, Simulated Missions Explore Utah’s Desert

Photos: Rae Ellen Bichell/NPR