science game

A Critique of a Poisoning in Literature: A Song of Ice and Fire’s Purple Wedding.

An analysis of Joffrey Baratheon’s poisoning in George R.R. Martin’s A Song of Ice and Fire: the chemical compound used, its effects, method of application and onset in comparison to a hypothetical real-life counterpart: strychnine, and the author’s justifications for suggesting this equivalent. Posting for those who said they were interested, a piece of coursework I wrote for a pharmacology poisons module / the university’s English literature department. I wrote this in the first year of my degree  ( 2+ years ago now! )  so don’t expect a lot from my writing/analytical skills !!!

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ID #94922

Name: Charlotte
Age: 18
Country: England

Hi I’m Charlotte, I’m 18 and I live in England. I’m currently in my first year at university.
My fave TV shows are OITNB, Riverdale, Gossip Girl etc!
I love Harry Potter, the Hunger Games and I’m a big rom-com fan.
I have such a wide range of music tastes, I’ll listen to pretty much anything - I’m a particular fan of Disney and musical songs… I have no shame!
This is actually really difficult, why have I forgotten everything about myself!!
I also love talking about interesting things, science, art, history, stuff like that really interests me and I love having conversations with people about those kinds of things as well as the fun stuff.

Preferences: I’d prefer someone 17-19ish but I’m honestly not hugely bothered!
I have absolutely no preference for gender, sexuality, race etc.

13.05.17 // Updated my physics window for the first time in ages! Had some thoughts over the past few weeks surrounding a free scalar field universe model so I drew them up as well as some old game theory because I watched a Beautiful Mind and felt nostalgic. I hope you are all having wonderful days / evening / whatever plane of existentialism you currently observe 😉

This video game could literally train our brains to resist symptoms of disease

  • Some research already suggests that gaming can be good for our brains. Now, a study found that a specific type could help treat “brain fog,” also known as “cognitive impairment.”
  • Cognitive impairment is when the brain is slow at processing information. It’s a symptom that appears in people with Multiple Sclerosis, Alzheimer’s disease, schizophrenia and other illnesses — but it also shows up in head injuries, depression, fevers or simply as we age.
  • Scientists asked a group of about 200 MS patients to play computer games for 12 weeks, or about 60 hours in total.
  • Some played regular puzzle games thought to sharpen the brain, such as a sudoku, while others played adaptive brain games developed by a group called PositScience.
  • The PositScience games use something known as “adaptive cognitive training.” The game adjusts its speed or difficulty level in real time, based on how well players perform on simple tasks like remembering a sequencing of numbers or identifying a target on the screen.
  • Patients who played the adaptive games reported significant improvement in their thought processing, leading Charvet to believe that these games could revolutionize how diseases are treated. Read more (5/18/17)
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