science community

I’ve been seeing some posts that are basically “fuck Bill Nye he only has a Bachelor’s degree and isn’t a REAL scientist” and like… guys. That’s not what being a science communicator is about. I’m not just talking about Nye here.

Science communication is a whole field of its own. You can be the most brilliant, qualified research scientist on the planet and have no teaching skills whatsoever. The ability to synthesize complex information and then explain it in simple, accessible language is not easy, and the more you know about a subject, the more difficult it is. Making scientific concepts available to the general public is really important work - work that active researchers are rarely able to undertake.

Say what you will about individuals, but please don’t dismiss the entire field of science communication and start parroting conservatives with the “um you should have a Ph.D before you should be allowed to talk about science”. Accuracy is key, obviously, but don’t throw educators under the bus, jfc.

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Trump’s decision to pull out of the Paris climate agreement is more than another bullet point in his anti-environment, anti-regulation policy agenda, it’s also a huge potential blow to thousands of American citizens, especially people of color, who often unfairly bear the brunt of climate change’s effects. Read more (5/31/17)

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handwritten physics notes from grade 11 🔭💫🌎 i wrote these notes during class (hence the post-its for additional info the teacher would mention here and there 😅) & i honestly enjoyed taking the class even though the tests were so difficult?? i guess that’s just me aaa

in case u didn’t know, i’m on studygram: thecoffeedesk ☕️ follow me!!!! hehe

I really do believe that at least part of the problem of people distrusting science has to do with how we as scientists portray ourselves.

We have actively created a system where we derive authority from being seen as better/smarter/more competent than everyone else and then when people ask why they should trust us we respond with a very condescending version of ‘because SCIENCE IS FACT’ or something along those lines.

Like, consider how that would feel from the outside? Here are a small group of people who you have never met/interacted with who sequester themselves in impenetrable ~elite institutions that you can’t access and don’t feel party to who then tell you that what they say is fact because they’re smarter and better educated than you. And if you ever try to question them (no matter how reasonable your objections may be/seem to you) they condescendingly pat you on the head and say something like ‘don’t worry we know better. you can’t possibly understand what we do.’

Why the hell would you trust them? 

No one likes being told that they’re not smart enough to understand something, and no one likes feeling excluded from something they’ve essentially been asked to accept sight unseen. 

I don’t really have a solution to this, except some vague notion about working harder to portray scientists as people working a job, rather than geniuses who are above it all. 

And like trying harder to understand where people are coming from when they question science. And remembering that being better educated than most doesn’t make us smarter than most. It just makes us better trained in certain types of thinking.

I just think we need to keep in mind what we are asking of people. Which is to put a whole hell of a lot of faith in us.

Rachel and I were discussing the reemergence of the speakeasy during the Trump administration, but instead of alcohol, the illicit material being bootlegged is climate science data. Underground communities of scientists meeting in smoky jazz joints to discuss CO2 emissions over stiff sidecars, miniature flash drives loaded with forbidden EPA data passed between folded napkins, scientific equipment hidden in saxophone cases. Ask the bartender for a ‘Pine Island melt’ and he’ll hook you up with some Antarctic temperature readings.

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Anti-vaxxers “targeted” Minnesota’s Somali community. Now there’s a measles outbreak.

  • Minnesota’s Hennepin County is in the midst of the state’s largest measles outbreak since 2011. Nine cases have been reported since last week, and officials expect the number to rise.
  • So far, all of the cases are among unvaccinated children. They have something else in common too: The affected children are all part of Minneapolis and St. Paul’s Somali-American community.
  • According to a health department official, Minnesota’s Somali immigrant community has been a particular target of the anti-vaccination movement, colloquially known as “anti-vaxxers.”
  • “They’re very much engaged with and targeting this community,” Kris Ehresmann, infectious disease division director at the Minnesota Health Department, said in a phone call Wednesday.
  • According to Ehresmann, anti-vaccine groups began to target the Somali community around 2008, amid concerns about autism among Somali-American children.
  • Anti-vaccine groups started reaching out to the Somali community and showing up at community health meetings, she said, disseminating misinformation linking autism to the measles, mumps and rubella vaccine, or MMR. Since then, the population has seen a “steady decline in MMR vaccine rates.” Read more (4/19/17)

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"37 Slogans For College Majors If They Were Actually Honest"

Accounting: selling your soul for money.

Aerospace Engineering: “it actually is rocket science.”

Anthropology: it’ll get you laid, but it won’t get you paid!

Archeology: if you don’t know what it is, it’s probably ceremonial.

Art History: and you thought making art was pointless!

Astrophysics: “Eh, I’m within an order of magnitude…”

Biochemistry: spend 4 years aspiring to discover the cure for cancer, and the rest of your life manufacturing shampoo.

Chemistry: where alcohol is a solution.

Communications: “we’ll teach you everything you need to know about convincing your friends that your degree is actually meaningful.”

Computer Engineering: tons of chicks, just not very many.

Computer Science (for a straight girl): the odds are good, but the goods are odd.

Creative Writing: because job security is for pussies.

Criminal Justice: we’re here because of Law & Order reruns.

Dental Hygienist: “something to do until you get knocked up.”

Engineering: the art of figuring out which parameters you can safely ignore.

English: so you want to be a teacher.

Film: forks on the left, knives on the right.

Finance: “accounting was too hard.”

Graphic Design: no, we’re not artists.  We’re designers; there’s a difference.

History: history may repeat itself, but you definitely will.

Information Technology: let me Google that for you.

Journalism: learn how to construct an argument that no one will listen to.

Latin: because useful is overrated.

Linguistics: studied 17 languages, fluent in none of them.

Marine Biology: “I wanted to play with dolphins, but I’m looking at algae instead.”

Music Performance: if you don’t hate yourself, you’re doing it wrong.

Nursing: learning to save others’ lives while struggling not to take your own.

Philosophy: think about it.

Photography: it’s worth a shot.

Physics: “everything you learned last week was wrong.”

Political Science: your opinion is wrong

Pre-med: “I’ll probably switch majors in two years.”

Psychology: good luck doing anything until you get your Masters.

Speech Pathology: we have a way of making you talk.

Statistics: where everything’s made up, and numbers don’t matter.

Structural Engineering: because architects don’t know what physics is.

Zoology: because you can’t major in kittens.

anonymous asked:

does tony think of peter as a son?

probably not consciously. he treats him kind of like a son sometimes, but that’s not very unusual for tony. tony has to be watched closely or he adopts stray genius children everywhere he goes.

 mostly it’s pretty long distance–he emails and videocalls them, sets up scholarships, funds research, talks them through school problems, introduces them to employers… i know for a fact that at least half of the starkphone beta testers are sleep-deprived students across the country who tony has run into at some convention or facility tour and decided to keep. some of them come to work at Stark Industries eventually, but a fair number go into other fields.

he has a strange ability to pinpoint exactly which kid in any given cluster is an untapped well of talent looking for mentoring. we have a number of bets running on if he’s doing it consciously or not. 

either way, he does it a lot.

he’s not very cuddly or touchy-feely with them, and he gets hilariously defensive if you poke him about it, but he’s actually a really good mentor, and he does really care. i mean, sometimes he uses the ‘do the exact opposite of what i would do’ method of role modelling, but…

sothatshowtheydoit  asked:

So i saw that you are planning on attending the science march on washington. I have heard some discussion in and around my office (i work a federal science organization(left out here in case you want to publish this response) about it being not a good idea because it turns science into another issue/cause. and science isn't an issue/cause. it's SCIENCE. Fact. etc. not a self-interested group. (this is a discussion i've had very briefly with my boss. curious as to your thoughts!)

Hi!

Well, you’re right. Science is science - but I disagree that science is neither an issue nor a cause, especially now. 

Science has been turned into an issue and a cause - a cause requiring public support, outcry, and defense - because our scientific institutions, our federal funding agencies, our progress, our international and highly diverse collaborators have already been politicized by being put at risk - and facts tell us that losing these opportunities and resources isn’t going to be good for anyone if we hope to have a productive, healthy country. That risk was growing, and the threat largely happened while we were inside, looking at our facts. It is abundantly apparent that Facts do not suffice in changing some people’s minds- facts are not the persuasive tools we (science-loving nerds) find them to be; they are neither a cure for misunderstandings, nor a remedy for falsehoods, when presented to a person for whom facts are neither resonant nor comforting. 

Whether or not people think the march ought to happen, it’s gonna happen, and here’s why I think that’s okay, and why I want you to join me:

I am a professional and effective science communicator, but nothing I can do alone - no video, no witty tweet, no long-winded blog post - has as much potential to impress in as many people’s minds the importance of supporting scientific endeavors as this march does. I believe the March on Science does have the potential to demonstrate the value of supporting science by way of a highly visible, compelling assembly of people who know a lot, who are concerned, and who are ready to act in support and in defense of scientific sanctities. There will certainly be people who use it as their last excuse to 100% totally and completely write off scientists. Okay, fine. After all, science has historically not done a great job of marketing itself, even to people who like science, so we’re just going to have to try something else to gain the trust and affection of people for whom facts don’t matter and science seems unimportant- but that’s later. 

It’s difficult and time consuming to demonstrate, time and again, the benefits that scientific research, discoveries, and innovations positively impart in our societies. But imagine how powerful it would be if all of the 821,517 members of the March for Science Facebook group - scientists, and supporters of science - actually showed up, signs in hands, marching together, in D.C. and in cities across America. That would be enormous. The American Chemical Society is the largest scientific society in the world, with over 157,000 members - some scientific meetings have around 20,000 attendees. But the March for Science could absolutely dwarf those numbers. It would be the single greatest meeting of people unified in collective support for global scientific endeavors than any other such gathering in the history of our planet. 

And that ^ is worth being a part of.

April 22nd, 2017 - Join up in D.C. or find the nearest march: MarchForScience.com

automation should be the downfall of capitalism, it literally proves not everyone needs to work, and we can all survive perfectly fine, and with all to have access to education we can automate even more shit most people don’t want to do.

capitalists literally don’t want to advance our society, they want us to stagnate so we can pretend people need the threat of death to work towards bettering themselves and the future.

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september 10, 2016 | 5:10 pm | 11/100

some of my science notes! 🍃🌺🌿 i got my midterm grades and i really don’t know what to feel 😅 also here’s a bit of my wall with motivanal quotes and postcards from different countries 🌎🌞

What not too many people talk about is how capitalism greatly affects both science and the arts.

By greatly affects i mean purposefully regresses because only certain aspects of both fields are focused on and supported only for their profit-making capabilities and almost never for its necessity, never how it could be used to benefit or enhance humanity, and never for its enjoyment or sense of personal (or communal) self fulfilment.

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Actor Alan Alda’s father wanted him to become a doctor, but it wasn’t meant to be. “I failed chemistry really disastrously … ” Alda says. “I really didn’t want to be a doctor; I wanted to be a writer and an actor.”

Which is exactly what happened. But Alda didn’t leave science behind entirely. His new book, If I Understood You, Would I Have This Look on My Face?, is all about communication — and miscommunication — between scientists and civilians.

Alan Alda’s Experiment: Helping Scientists Learn To Talk To The Rest Of Us