sci fi women

nytimes.com
Margaret Atwood on What ‘The Handmaid’s Tale’ Means in the Age of Trump
Atwood on whether her dystopian classic is meant as a “feminist” novel, as antireligion or as a prediction.
By Margaret Atwood

TW for sexual assault, gender violence

“Which brings me to three questions I am often asked.

First, is “The Handmaid’s Tale” a “feminist” novel? If you mean an ideological tract in which all women are angels and/or so victimized they are incapable of moral choice, no. If you mean a novel in which women are human beings - with all the variety of character and behavior that implies - and are also interesting and important, and what happens to them is crucial to the theme, structure and plot of the book, then yes. In that sense, many books are “feminist.”

Why interesting and important? Because women are interesting and important in real life. They are not an afterthought of nature, they are not secondary players in human destiny, and every society has always known that. Without women capable of giving birth, human populations would die out. That is why the mass rape and murder of women, girls and children has long been a feature of genocidal wars, and of other campaigns meant to subdue and exploit a population. Kill their babies and replace their babies with yours, as cats do; make women have babies they can’t afford to raise, or babies you will then remove from them for your own purposes, steal babies - it’s been a widespread, age-old motif. The control of women and babies has been a feature of every repressive regime on the planet. Napoleon and his “cannon fodder,” slavery and its ever-renewed human merchandise — they both fit in here. Of those promoting enforced childbirth, it should be asked: Cui bono? Who profits by it? Sometimes this sector, sometimes that. Never no one.”

Read the full essay by Margaret Atwood here

The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood

*Sister* “Don’t you ever worry about the future, Sharon?” *Me* “I would, sure, but Donald Trump is in charge. Thus, I assume WW3 and the nuclear apocalypse are imminent. At this point ‘planning for my future’ would be learning to drive a tank around a desolate wasteland, watching Mad Max: Fury Road 100x, and getting over my fear of cockroaches.”

*Me* “Admittedly, I haven’t planned for zombies. But I will take one thing at a time.”

youtube

JellyWolf starring: Kiersey Clemons and Lisa Bonet
A film by Alma Har’el

Viola Davis as Dr. Charlene Barton in The Andromeda Strain (2008)

Synopsis: A crack team of top scientists work feverishly in a secret, state-of-the-art laboratory to discover what has killed the citizens of a small town and learn how this deadly contagion can be stopped.

Written by Michael Crichton and Robert Schenkkan

Directed by Mikael Salomon

imdb.com

Octavia Butler (1947-2006) was a famous and prolific science fiction writer. She was the first science fiction author to receive the MacArthur Fellowship, also known as the “Genius Grant”.

Some of her most famous works are Bloodchild and Parable of the Sower, for which she received Hugo and Nebula Awards. In 2000 she received the Lifetime Achievement Award in Writing from the PEN American Center.

vimeo

After many delays, my graduation film. It’s about two best friends who explore a city floating in the air, where an unexpected discovery puts their friendship to the test. If you liked, comment, like, reblog, whatever, it would be highly appreciated. :)