scholarly resource

Scholarly Resource Alert! A freely available resource, Italian Renaissance Learning Resources features eight units, each of which explores a different theme in Italian Renaissance art.

Picturing Family and Friends: In this unit we look at works of art that reveal some of the dynamics of personal relationships in Renaissance Italy. The first section of the essay explores husbands and wives, while the second discusses children. The third section takes a peek at lovers of various sorts, and the fourth considers friends (and a few celebrated enemies). Throughout the unit we examine marriage customs, family structure, and the humanist idea of platonic love (as well as the more earthly sort of love), and we learn more about the objects—paintings, sculpture, commemorative medals, and domestic articles—through which these complex and overlapping connections were expressed.

This project is a collaboration between the National Gallery of Art and OUP’s Grove Art Online. It was made possible through the support of the Samuel H. Kress Foundation.

Image credit: Titian, Ranuccio Farnese, Samuel H. Kress Collection. Image courtesy of the Board of Trustees, National Gallery of Art.

Scholarly Resource Alert! David Grove, author of Tapeworms, Lice, and Prions: A compendium of unpleasant infections, alerted us to a BBC series, starting Wednesday 19 February, in which Dr Michael Mosley turns his body into a living laboratory by deliberately infecting himself with some extraordinary parasites. (via BBC - Media Centre - Programme Information - Michael Mosley: Infested! Living With Parasites)

Scholarly Resource Alert! A freely available resource, Italian Renaissance Learning Resources features eight units, each of which explores a different theme in Italian Renaissance art.

Artists and Patrons: The Renaissance produced many types of patrons: men and women, individuals and families, religious and lay groups, civic bodies and princely rulers. Differing motivations and concerns influenced their relationships with artists and the art that was created. The overwhelming majority of Renaissance commissions were of a religious nature, but they served various ends. Commissions gave greater glory to a person or family, enhanced and embellished a city or a religious institution, honored a saint or accrued as a credit to the Christian “account” of believers—or all of these at once. In this unit we consider artists and patrons in Italy’s aristocratic courts, where patronage was also an important tool of rulership. Our discussion is focused on five cities (Milan, Urbino, Naples, Mantua, and Ferrara) and on a brief period, from around 1450 to the early sixteenth century, a time of relative political calm that allowed states to devote funds and energy to ambitious artistic projects.

This project is a collaboration between the National Gallery of Art and OUP’s Grove Art Online. It was made possible through the support of the Samuel H. Kress Foundation.

Image credit: North Italian 15th Century, Francesco Sforza, Widener Collection. Image courtesy of the Board of Trustees, National Gallery of Art.

Very Short Introductions Online will be launched with over 350 titles, with the rest to follow. It will be available as a whole, or split into subject modules (for example the Arts and Humanities, Science and Mathematics, Social Sciences, and Law, or smaller modules such as History, Philosophy, Literature, Religion, Physics, and so forth).” (via Very Short Introductions go online | OUPblog)

English Major in Need of Sources

Hello everyone! I’m an English major working on a highly ambitious senior Honors project: I want to establish an animal-assisted literacy program in an elementary school in the county surrounding my university. The county is impoverished and has low literacy rates, and I’m beginning this program in the hopes that it will continue after I graduate. 

I am looking for resources about animal-assisted programs and their affects, most notably scholarly journal article or books. I need to draft a literature review by the end of the summer, and though I am slogging through each resource available to my university. I will continue to search, but I also thought I would reach out to the tumblr scholar community for assistance/additional scholarly resources/whatever y’all can give me.

What is an animal-assisted literacy program?

An animal-assisted literacy program is a program where trained animal-handler teams conduct reading sessions with students. The animals are overwhelmingly dogs, and the students are usually elementary school children, though there may be exceptions in both cases. The student reads to the dog and the handler supervises the interactions between the dog and the student. 

How do animal-assisted literacy programs help students?

The dog provides the student with an attentive audience for practicing reading skills and pronunciation. Unlike a teacher or parent, a dog will never rush the student through reading, become impatient with the student, or attempt to correct a student’s mistakes prematurely. Instead, the dog’s presence will act as encouragement for the student to work through difficult words or passages alone.

The handler supervises interactions to make sure that the dog and the student both remain happy and unharmed during the session. The handler also acts as a interpreter for the dog to the student, explaining what certain body language or reactions may mean. Often the handler acts as a bridge between the dog and the student but will remain in the background for the majority of the session.

What kind of information do I need?

I’m really passionate about this project and am very eager to get my hands on any and all information I can find about animal-assisted literacy. That being said, there are some specific things that I’m looking for:

- Statistics about improvement or quantifiable “success” of individual programs (even if program are discontinued or no longer in operation)

- Anecdotes from students or teachers about their experience with an animal-assisted literacy program, good or bad (names will be removed from the official report, but if the anecdotes are from you, I would only need your name for attribution and my personal records on the project)

- Scholarly articles or books written about animal-assisted literacy and its impact on students, teachers, and overall school/school system

I’ll be gathering this information for a long time (all summer, then for months afterward), so if you have any information or good sources for me, please always message me. I’ll give you my email address in the message if you have Word documents or PDF files to send. 

I would really appreciate that you signal boost this if you don’t have information for me. I really want to get this program established in the county surrounding my university, but I can’t even begin to start the program without good facts and statistics to rely upon in my literature review.

Thank you, and have a great day!

i am a SERIOUS art student that checks out biographies on renaissance artists from my vast art school library resource for SCHOLARLY PURPOSES and DEFINITELY not to research for my leo/michelangelo fic

Elsevier’s new sharing and hosting policy represents a significant obstacle to the dissemination and use of research knowledge, and creates unnecessary barriers for Elsevier published authors in complying with funders’ open access policies, according to an analysis by the Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition (SPARC) and the Confederation of Open Access Repositories (COAR).

lifeandprejudice asked:

Hey! Sorry to bother you. My friend and I are running this blog as an open space for people to talk about prejudice in anyway. Whether it's opinions or stories. If you could let your followers know about us that would be amazing.(This is also part of a psychology project so if you pass this along our grade will really appreciate :D)

I’m going to be optimistic and hope this isn’t some 4chan nonsense or someone just looking to be malicious and bait people into being harassed. But, as long as it’s legit, I’ll gladly share. Good luck on the project. If you need any help, have questions, need some scholarly resources, etc., just let me know. Aside from my own vast knowledge, I’ve also got a lifetime of experience personally with systemic racism and prejudice, and I’ve been heavily involved in Ferguson (I live in St Louis, which Ferguson is a suburb of) and the surrounding area where police continue to kill black youth with impunity.