scanning

4

Home Sweet Home

Usually plastic and the environment do not go hand in hand, but artist Aki Inomata uses plastic to create an environment for her little pet hermit crabs in “Why Not Hand Over a “Shelter” to Hermit Crabs?” (2009, 2010-2013).

With the help of CT scanning to render a three-dimensional model of an empty shell, Inomata creates her base and then builds houses atop these shell renderings. These architectural wonders mimic the style of popular dwellings, from Tokyo house-style to Paris apartments. 

With these plastic hermit crab habitats, Inomata wanted to explore not only the hermit crab’s adaptability to new surroundings, but how we adapt as well. Immigration, relocation, even acquiring a new identity or nationality is more or less the human version of growing out of a shell, and finding a new one to call ‘home’.

Not only is this series an amazing symbolic representation of our will to adapt, but also a fun way to learn more about the life and physiology of the hermit crab, as the dwellings are completely see-through. Have you ever wondered what a hermit crab’s body looks like inside its shell?

A video of both the hermit crabs in action and how the artist came about designing the shells can be found here.

-Anna Paluch

5

Scanning the Next Best Sandwich with @scanwiches

To see more of Jon’s scanwiches, follow @scanwiches on Instagram.

Jon Chonko’s (@scanwiches) favorite sandwich is the one he’s going to eat next. “Sandwiches are something you can take a risk on,” the designer from Brooklyn, New York says. “You can specialize them to your tastes, your preferences, your mood at the time. Whatever you want to put inside of one, you can.” Jon started documenting sandwiches — cut in half, photographed with a scanner, of course — in 2009 to encourage himself to be more of an adventurous eater. He has never scanned the same sandwich from the same place more than once. And, Jon doesn’t spend extra time thinking about scans of sandwiches past. “I don’t think it’s necessarily healthy to be nostalgic about sandwiches,” he says. “The next one could be the best ever.”

Cleaning Up Scans Tutorial

Hey guys! Yesterday artofcrystaldawn asked me how I digitally clean up my scans so I thought I’d make a little tutorial for all of you! Today I’ll show you the steps I take to clean up my sketches and this afternoon I’m going to paint this drawing and then I’ll show you how I digitally tweak the scans of my watercolors. Digital is about 50% of the process for me, both in the beginning (color roughs) and the end (tweaking bad scans to make them look either like the original or better than the original!).

I’m by no means a photoshop-ninja, these are just things I’ve picked up over time, but I wish someone had told me how to clean scans years ago so I thought I’d post my process. Sorry if this post takes up a lot of space on your dashboards (lots of photos!). If you don’t want to read it all, here’s a short breakdown of tips:

1. use a rough-edged brush to paint white

2. treat the rubber stamp tool like a brush and alter it’s settings, you’ll get more natural results

3. err on the side of not overdoing things. over-adjusting levels or over-doing the rubber stamp will look either garish or blurry (the more you rubber stamp, the blurrier it gets).  Dab at it instead.

This entire process takes about 10 minutes once you’re used to it, so it’s pretty fast!

STEP ONE: PAINT AWAY STUFF YOU DON’T WANT

Here’s the original scan of this drawing, pretty crappy:

I use a rough-edged brush to paint white around the part I want. I choose a rough brush because I think it helps to have a non-hard edge between where you’ve erased and where you haven’t to help it look more natural.

STEP TWO: ADJUST LEVELS (LIGHTLY!)

With less information to mess with, and most of the big stuff taken care of, I adjust the levels. Don’t go nuts doing this, though I totally find it tempting, too! I try to stay just right of the big peak of white because if I put the marker in the middle of the white it ends up looking too washed out (especially if I have “grey” tones like shaded-in skin tones). I mostly just adjust the white and then carefully tweak the middle values and barely touch the darkest values for sketches, or else the whole thing starts to look too garish. It’s okay if there are a few fuzzballs that adjusting the levels didn’t fix, we’ll get to those.

STEP THREE: FIX FUZZBALLS BY PAINTING

See these fuzzballs? 

BEFORE

This is when I go through and paint with the paintbrush in white the little imperfections away. I also sometimes edit the drawing a little here like removing those crazy sketch lines at the bottom of the drawing.

AFTER (I didn’t get them all this time, oh well)

STEP FOUR: RUBBER STAMP AWAY YOUR MESS UPS!

Sometimes I bung things up in a way I can’t erase with painting, so I use the rubber stamp tool. This thing is a powerful tool, so I recommend treating it with respect and not going nuts with it. :) I used to overuse it and it makes pieces look blurry or fuzzy. I dab with it now (with a tablet pen) and I also recommend playing with the opacity/flow in the “other dynamics” settings on the brush. It took me years to realize you could edit the tip of the rubber stamp, durr, but I seriously recommend it! It makes the stamp look much more natural (a must for watercolor editing which will come tomorrow).

Here are the things we’re trying to remove:

BEFORE

Settings I use. The brush is under “wet media brushes” in the basic brushes that come with photoshop cs4 (I’m behind, what).  The other dynamics are set to off with this picture because what I was removing wasn’t complicated, but I think it’s worth playing with them to see what you like:

AFTER:

And there you have it! It’s not perfect, but then again, it IS a sketch! :) I hope that helps, guys, and thanks once again for all your support! Stay-tuned, tomorrow I’ll post a tutorial on how to edit watercolor scans!

6

Dense Planar SLAM

Experimental AR computer vision project by Renato Salas-Moreno utilizes an RGB-D sensor and Oculus Rift to detect flat areas within a space to add digital content … such as placing a Facebook wall onto your living room wall - video embedded below:

We present an efficient new real-time approach which densely maps an environment using bounded planes and surfels extracted from depth images (like those produced by RGB-D sensors or dense multi-view stereo reconstruction). Our method offers the every-pixel descriptive power of the latest dense SLAM approaches, but takes advantage directly of the planarity of many parts of real-world scenes via a data-driven process to directly regularize planar regions and represent their accurate extent efficiently using an occupancy approach with on-line compression. Large areas can be mapped efficiently and with useful semantic planar structure which enables intuitive and useful AR applications such as using any wall or other planar surface in a scene to display a user’s content.

More Here

5

DynamicFusion

Computer vision 3D construction project from the uofwa [University of Washington] can create 3D scans of moving subjects with current commercial depth sensor technology. To understand why this is significant, most approaches currently require the subject to be completely still to be captured accurately and without errors:

With the availability of massively-parallel commodity computing hardware, we demonstrate new algorithms that achieve high quality incremental dense reconstruction within online visual SLAM. The result is a live dense reconstruction (LDR) of scenes that makes possible numerous applications that can utilise online surface modelling, for instance: planning robot interactions with unknown objects, augmented reality with characters that interact with the scene, or providing enhanced data for object recognition.

More Here

4

No Drama

Great new music video for track by Cadenza featuring Avelino and Assassin put together by @pussykrevv is an energetic mix of 3D scanning and pixel sorting glitches:

Our aim was to create a piece beyond the standard performance video. We presented the artists as 3D scans and fused them with digitally created environment. The vibe of the track is intense, bit aggressive. We were trying to recreate this atmosphere as a visual experience and produce powerful imagery, where the invisible violence is transformed into personal strength.
The video may seem dark at first, but this darkness is not hopeless, it’s a state of matter where one can be reborn and reclaim their mastery. We were envisioning an aftermath of a battle, some sort of weird cathartic occurrence.
We decided to put the strong female characters at the front of the piece, as we thought they would be the best at translating the energy of the song and convey the message we wanted to communicate through the video. We feel that our work reflects the nature of current times in many ways, filtering everyday experiences and global issues into painting­-like scenes. 

More Here