sauron's ring

Sauron (explained in gifs)

Mairon

Originally posted by great-gif

Seduction of Mairon

Originally posted by yourreactiongifs

Lieutenant of Angband

Originally posted by emilysurvivesgradschool

Tol-in-Gauroth (Isle of Werewolves)

Originally posted by thesadseal

Duel of Finrod

Originally posted by sophnetty

Bite of Huan

Originally posted by futurefatswagjesus

Defeat of Morgoth

Originally posted by yourreactiongifs

Annatar

Originally posted by whoeverx3

Rings of Power

Originally posted by 6nose6bleed6

Númenor

Originally posted by catchingthefunnies

Post-Númenor

Originally posted by drunkbroadway

Loss of the Ring

Originally posted by realitytvgifs

Third Age

Originally posted by jonathanohhey

Destruction of the One-Ring

Originally posted by fansofmarkimoo

8

lotr 30 days challenge: day 17 | favorite antagonist
«..And there is Sauron. In the Silmarillion and Tales of the First Age Sauron was a being of Valinor perverted to the service of the Enemy and becoming his chief captain and servant. He repents in fear when the First Enemy is utterly defeated, but in the end does not do as was commanded, return to the judgement of the gods. He lingers in Middle-earth. Very slowly, beginning with fair motives: the reorganising and rehabilitation of the ruin of Middle-earth, ‘neglected by the gods’, he becomes a re-incarnation of Evil, and a thing lusting for Complete Power – and so consumed ever more fiercely with hate.»

Nazgul Giving Sauron Their Report After Getting Drowned in The River Bruinen.
  • Nazgul: So, we made a couple of small mistakes.
  • Sauron: You stabbed pillows thinking they were hobbits.
  • Nazgul: Okay then Lord Perfect, medium sized mistakes.
It’s a bit more complicated than invisibility...

This occurred to me and I feel it’s worth posting since I’ve never seen any talk on this?

The One Ring doesn’t make you invisible. 

Why would it? Seriously, what purpose on Eru’s green earth does that serve? Sauron forging his ring of power in the heart of a volcano, thinking to himself, ah yes, invisibility would be a good trick to build into this thing! No. Cause you know what? Sauron’s ring does not make him invisible. And he certainly did not intend for anyone else to ever have it. So what’s it really doing?

Two words: Dimensional shift

I believe that when mortals put on the ring, they experience a dimensional shift in which they are pulled (stretched, transported) into a higher dimension, the plane on which the true spirit forms of the Ainur (and wraiths) exist. This would effectively render them invisible to those on lower dimensions, but the wearer would be able to view them with altered enhanced perception. Such as the effects we witness as described by those who have worn the ring. Especially well portrayed in the films is the ability to see the souls of others, particularly the ringwraiths (the battle on Weathertop is a good example, as well as even in Battle of the Five Armies when Bilbo is in Dale), black and white shadowy souls clear as day but invisible to the naked eye, as they exist on a different dimensional plane. It’s quite possible to me that the ëalar of the Ainur are in a higher dimension than that of mortal fëar, but that’s beside the point. They’re at least a couple dimensions removed from our reality, and thus invisible until one puts on the ring. 

Now, why would the ring have this power? I think, if I recall correctly, that Tolkien at one point did state that it was not intentional, that it was a byproduct of its making. Again, it does not turn Sauron invisible - it wouldn’t, he already exists on that plane. Mortals are bound to their bodies and so would not be able to perceive that higher dimension, but Ainur are not. I think most plausibly, this effect exists because Sauron infused a piece of his own soul into the one ring. The consequences of this are not well understood (it’s not like it’s a common practice) and we know in other ways, it is so strong in its desire to hearken back to its master, it can even influence the wills - a product of the souls - of those around it. I would not be surprised in the slightest if having a piece of Ainur ëala in an all-powerful object would result in the ability to bend reality to attempt to match the wearer to the properties of the owner. It would bring the wearer closer to Sauron, and allow him to perceive them, thus furthering its purpose to return to the whole from which it is a part. 

Just a theory, obviously, but I find it odd that I’ve never seen anyone question the rather absurd notion of ‘magic evil ring makes you invisible!’ Tolkien set up so many intriguing questions, concepts, and possibilities with underlying scientific principles - or at least, consistent rules - that I am sure this fits into his framework. 

If [Sam had not unwittingly foiled Gollum’s repentance], what could then have happened? The course of the entry into Mordor and the struggle to reach Mount Doom would have been different, and so would the ending. The interest would have shifted to Gollum, I think, and the battle that would have gone on between his repentance and his new love on one side and the Ring. Though the love would have been strengthened daily it could not have wrested the mastery from the Ring. I think that in some queer twisted and pitiable way Gollum would have tried (not maybe with conscious design) to satisfy both. Certainly at some point not long before the end he would have stolen the Ring or taken it by violence (as he does in the actual Tale). But ‘possession’ satisfied, I think he would then have sacrificed himself for Frodo’s sake and have /voluntarily/ cast himself into the fiery abyss.

I think that an effect of his partial regeneration by love would have been a clearer vision when he claimed the Ring. He would have perceived the evil of Sauron, and suddenly realized that he could not use the Ring and had not the strength or stature to keep it in Sauron’s despite: the only way to keep it and hurt Sauron was to destroy it and himself together – and in a flash he may have seen that this would also be the greatest service to Frodo.
—  Tolkien, J.R.R. The Letters of J.R.R. Tolkien. Ed. Humphrey Carpenter and Christopher Tolkien. (London: HarperCollins, 2006.) 330 (L246)

LEGO BATMAN: The multifandom villain team



Originally posted by sanctuaryforall1

Originally posted by gondorbutt

Originally posted by devilduck




Originally posted by agent-smithexe



Originally posted by welcometoyouredoom


Someone has been watching a lot of memes and that someone is me lol.

Look, you keep expecting me to pull victories out of my ass, and I understand that, but “fucking massive army of the undead that answers to exactly one person in all the world” is not a reasonable or obvious strategy to prepare for.

- an excerpt from the final report of Supreme Orc Commander General Gothmog, detailing the reasons for defeat in Pelargir, The Lord of the Rings, book V, chapter VI