saturn's north pole

derpyfez  asked:

WHAT'S YOUR FAVOURITE PART ABOUT SPACE AND SCIENCE AND AAAAAAAAAAH

I really like that we can discover exoplanets and get data on what they’re like!? Even other Galaxies!!

Titan has Methane lakes!? That’s crazy!!

Saturn’s hexagonal north pole storm is extremely fascinating!!

Neptune is very cold but has a heating core and that’s bonkers!!

And in science, I just like any chemical reaction that blows up or catches on fire °v°;

3

“CARYPOLITE”

Carypolites are gems made for fusion and engineering.
Carypolites are gemstones that can be generated in Saturn’s north pole, it cannot be found on Earth. Hence, no google results… Due to Saturn’s extreme weather. All Carypolites have very short tempers and extreme personalities!
This specific Carypolite is defective and is used as an alchemist in Pink Diamond’s court. Her weapon is a gauntlet that is used to punch and shoot electric projectiles at undisciplined gems. She is currently making gem technology being used in the second gem war.

Saturn’s Hexagon and Rings

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute

Explanation: Why would clouds form a hexagon on Saturn? Nobody is sure. Originally discovered during the Voyager flybys of Saturn in the 1980s, nobody has ever seen anything like it anywhere else in the Solar System. If Saturn’s South Pole wasn’t strange enough with its rotating vortex, Saturn’s North Pole might be considered even stranger. The bizarre cloud pattern is shown above in great detail by a recent image taken by the Saturn-orbiting Cassini spacecraft. This and similar images show the stability of the hexagon even 20+ years after Voyager. Movies of Saturn’s North Pole show the cloud structure maintaining its hexagonal structure while rotating. Unlike individual clouds appearing like a hexagon on Earth, the Saturn cloud pattern appears to have six well defined sides of nearly equal length. Four Earths could fit inside the hexagon. Imaged from the side, the dark shadow of the Jovian planet is seen eclipsing part of its grand system of rings, partly visible on the upper right.

This image is among the first sunlit views of Saturn’s north pole captured by Cassini’s imaging cameras. When the spacecraft arrived in the Saturnian system in 2004, it was northern winter and the north pole was in darkness. Saturn’s north pole was last imaged under sunlight by NASA’s Voyager 2 in 1981; however, the observation geometry did not allow for detailed views of the poles. Consequently, it is not known how long this newly discovered north-polar hurricane has been active.

the Cassini spacecraft’s narrow-angle camera recorded this stunning image of the vortex at the ringed planet’s north pole. The false color, near-infrared image results in red hues for low clouds and green for high ones, causing the north-polar hurricane to take on the appearance of a rose. Enormous by terrestrial hurricane standards, this storm’s eye is about 2,000 kilometers wide, with clouds at the outer edge traveling at over 500 kilometers per hour. The north pole Saturn hurricane swirls inside the large, six-sided weather pattern known as the hexagon. Of course, in 2006 Cassini also imaged the hurricane at Saturn’s south pole.

 Acquiring its first sunlit views of far northern Saturn late last year, the Cassini spacecraft’s narrow-angle camera recorded this stunning image of the vortex at the ringed planet’s north pole. The false color, near-infrared image results in red hues for low clouds and green for high ones, causing the north-polar hurricane to take on the appearance of a rose. Enormous by terrestrial hurricane standards, this storm’s eye is about 2,000 kilometers wide, with clouds at the outer edge traveling at over 500 kilometers per hour. The north pole Saturn hurricane swirls inside the large, six-sided weather pattern known as the hexagon. 

Image Credit: Cassini Imaging Team, SSI, JPL, ESA, NASA