BC VS. BU Ends In OT, OMG IDC

Last night BC beat BU in OT and I DGAF, LOL. This isn’t the NHL FFS, GTFO.

“SOS” said BU. “IDK what to do, our brains are MIA. We are losing ATM.”

“WTF” said BU hockey fan TJ DeGeebe (CAS), “I’m V PO’ed. This is BS.”

FYI, BC was told BYOB. TYVM. They are not VIP. 

At press time, BBQ NRA, JFK. USSR CIA, IMDB. DMV, TLC PHD. NP, DOA, AKA ATM, OMW, SSN. TTYL.

spoofART… BigPharma’s gateway drugs. ‘Kicker’ is OxyContin, ‘White Boy’ is Xanax and 'Benny’ is Adderall. Those are 'street names’. (Alternate version) (See also my original, slightly different version)

2

Bassem Youssef has often been called “the Jon Stewart of Egypt,” and his show was known as the Daily Show of the Arab World.  The comparison is no coincidence: Youssef modeled his show on The Daily Show.  And as a result of his show’s success, he’s been a guest on The Daily Show.  Youssef  was a heart surgeon, when in 2011, after the revolution that overthrew Egyptian president Hosni Mubarak, Youssef started hosting a 5 minute satirical YouTube series, shot in his home.  He gave up medicine when he was invited to expand the webisodes into a weekly TV series. It became the most popular TV series in Egypt’s history.  But Mohammed Morsi, who was elected president after Mubrak’s fall, didn’t appreciate being satirized. In 2013, Morsi accused Youssef of insulting the president and insulting Islam.  A warrant was issued for Youssef’s arrest.  He turned himself in and was interrogated for six hours before being released on bail. Youssef returned to political satire, but the leaders of the military coup that pushed out President Morsi, didn’t like being satirized either.  Youssef’s show was terminated, and he got out of Egypt.  

In 2014 Terry Gross spoke to John Oliver, who mentioned Youssef as an inspiration:  

JOHN OLIVER: But I think about [Bassem Youssef], I actually think about him a lot, Terry, because I know him a little bit and, you know, we email back and forth sometimes. And what he does, you know, Jon Stewart will say the same thing, what Bassem is doing - he is at the pointy end of political comedy because he is not immune from consequences in the way that you almost entirely are when you live in America. It’s hard to overstate the difficulty of the conditions that he had to work under when that show was on the air.

So I feel, genuinely, that I owe him in a way. If you have the chance to do dumb things, you should do them. You shouldn’t be scared if you have nothing to be scared about. He wasn’t scared and he had plenty to be scared about. So I have no business even letting any of those concerns cross my mind, when Bassem did the kind of things that he did, and when being worried not just about him and his family, but his whole staff. So, yeah, I’ve got no real time for thinking about those kind of things.

Hear today’s interview:

‘Egyptian Jon Stewart’ Bassem Youssef Will Now Satirize U.S. Democracy