sarsen

Gold Sun Disc from time of Stonehenge revealed to the public

For the first time, an early Bronze Age sun-disc from Monkton Farleigh in Wiltshire, U.K., is being exhibited for public view at the Wiltshire Museum, in time for this year’s summer solstice. It is one of only 6 sun-disc finds and is one of the earliest metal objects found in Britain. Made in about 2,400 BC, soon after the sarsen stones were erected at Stonehenge, it is thought to represent the sun.

The sun-disc was initially found in 1947 in a burial mound at Monkton Farleigh, just over 20 miles from Stonehenge, during excavations conducted by Guy Underwood. With it were found a pottery beaker, flint arrowheads and fragments of the skeleton of an adult male. It was kept safe by the landowner since its discovery and has only now been given to the Museum after careful cleaning by the Wiltshire Council Conservation Service. Read more.

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I’ve heard of Carlton Melton solely through a collaboration with Bardo Pond, but “Sarsen” is the first song of theirs I’ve actually listened to. Given the company they keep, psychedelic, obviously, but also with a heavy dose of Hawkwindesque space rock.

Rare gold sun disc from Stonehenge era publicly revealed for the first time to mark solstice

To mark this year’s summer solstice in the northern hemisphere, Wiltshire Museum in England will be publicly revealing for the first time an early Bronze Age sun disc that was crafted soon after the sarsen stones were put in position at Stonehenge. The rare, 4,400-year-old golden relic was found in a burial mound at Monkton Farleigh, just over 20 miles from Stonehenge.

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Amesbury, Wiltshire SP4 7DE

Stonehenge is a prehistoric monument located in Wiltshire, England, about 2 miles west of Amesbury and 8 miles north of Salisbury.

A must see!


10 Facts about Stonehenge according to Emma McFarnon:

• Built in several stages, Stonehenge began about 5,000 years ago as a simple earthwork enclosure where prehistoric people buried their cremated dead. The stone circle was erected in the centre of the monument in the late Neolithic period, around 2500 BC

• Two types of stone are used at Stonehenge: the larger sarsens, and the smaller bluestones. There are 83 stones in total

• There were originally only two entrances to the enclosure, English Heritage explains – a wide one to the north east, and a smaller one on the southern side. Today there are many more gaps – this is mainly the result of later tracks that once crossed the monument

• A circle of 56 pits, known as the Aubrey Holes (named after John Aubrey, who identified them in 1666), sits inside the enclosure. Its purpose remains unknown, but some believe the pits once held stones or posts

• The stone settings at Stonehenge were built at a time of “great change in prehistory,” says English Heritage, “just as new styles of ‘Beaker’ pottery and the knowledge of metalworking, together with a transition to the burial of individuals with grave goods, were arriving from Europe. From about 2400 BC, well furnished Beaker graves such as that of the Amesbury Arche are found nearby”

• Roman pottery, stone, metal items and coins have been found during various excavations at Stonehenge. An English Heritage report in 2010 said that considerably fewer medieval artefacts have been discovered, which suggests the site was used more sporadically during the period

• Stonehenge has a long relationship with astronomers, the report explains. In 1720, Dr Halley used magnetic deviation and the position of the rising sun to estimate the age of Stonehenge. He concluded the date was 460 BC. And, in 1771, John Smith mused that the estimated total of 30 sarsen stones multiplied by 12 astrological signs equalled 360 days of the year, while the inner circle represented the lunar month

• The first mention of Stonehenge – or ‘Stanenges’ – appears in the archaeological study of Henry of Huntingdon in about AD 1130, and that of Geoffrey of Monmouth six years later. In 1200 and 1250 it appeared as ‘Stanhenge’ and ‘Stonhenge’; as ‘Stonheng’ in 1297, and ‘the stone hengles’ in 1470. It became known as ‘Stonehenge’ in 1610, says English Heritage

• In the 1880s, after carrying out some of the first scientifically recorded excavations at the site, Charles Darwin concluded that earthworms were largely to blame for the Stonehenge stones sinking through the soil

• By the beginning of the 20th century there had been more than 10 recorded excavations, and the site was considered to be in a “sorry state”, says English Heritage – several sarsens were leaning. Consequently the Society of Antiquaries lobbied the site’s owner, Sir Edmond Antrobus, and offered to assist with conservation

Stonehenge by annie7: Stonehenge is a massive stone monument located on a chalky plain north of the city of Salisbury, England. Research shows that the site has continuously evolved over a period of about 10,000 years. The structure that we call ‘Stonehenge’ was built approx. 4,000 and 5,000 years ago and that forms just one part of a larger and highly complex, sacred landscape.
The biggest of Stonehenge’s stones, known as sarsens, are up to 30” tall and weigh 25 tons on average. It is widely believed that they were brought from Marlborough Downs, a distance of 20 miles to the north.
Smaller stones, referred to as ‘bluestones’ weigh up to 4 tons and come from several different sites in western Wales, having been transported as far as 140 miles. It’s unknown how people in antiquity moved them that far. Scientists have raised the possibility that during the last ice age glaciers carried these bluestones closer to the Stonehenge area and the monument’s makers didn’t have to move them all the way from Wales. Water transport thought raft is another idea that has been proposed but researchers now question whether this method was viable.

Rare gold sun disc from Stonehenge era publicly revealed for the first time to mark solstice

To mark this year’s summer solstice in the northern hemisphere, Wiltshire Museum in England will be publicly revealing for the first time an early Bronze Age sun disc that was crafted soon after the sarsen stones were put in position at Stonehenge. The rare, 4,400-year-old golden relic was found in a burial mound at Monkton Farleigh, just over 20 miles from Stonehenge. The sun disc was first unearthed in 1947 during excavations of the burial mound, which also yielded a pottery beaker, flint arrowheads and the remains of an adult male. Wiltshire Museum reports that the landowner kept possession of the precious artifact until recently, when he decided to hand it over to the Museum. It has now been cleaned and prepared for its first ever display in the Museum to mark this year’s mid-summer solstice.Read moreSection: NewsGeneral www.Ancient-Origins.net – Reconstructing the story of humanity’s past http://b4in.com/jQHawww.Ancient-Origins.net – Reconstructing the story of humanity’s past http://b4in.com/jQHa

Rare gold sun disc from Stonehenge era publicly revealed for the first time to mark solstice

Rare gold sun disc from Stonehenge era publicly revealed for the first time to mark solstice

By The Rundown Live April Holloway | AncientOrigins To mark this year’s summer solstice in the northern hemisphere, Wiltshire Museum in England will be publicly revealing for the first time an early Bronze Age sun disc that was crafted soon after the sarsen stones were put in position at Stonehenge. The rare, 4,400-year-old golden relic was found in a burial mound at Monkton Farleigh, just over…

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