sand dirt

🌲 Forest With Me Spell 🌲

The forest is full of peace and magick, bring it home with you to boost your spells and provide peace.

Gather

🌲 Bottle

🌲 earth (dirt, sand, rocks)

🌲 Assorted forest items (berries, leaves, flowers, bark, seeds)

(side note: do not collect or ingest anything that you are unsure about. Even if 99% sure about a plant id, don’t pick it. It’s for your own safety.)

Process

🌲 Take your bottle on a nature walk or hike. This can be anywhere deep in the woods or in an urban park. Work with your surroundings.

🌲 Half way through you walk stop and collect some earth from the ground and place it in your bottle. This can be what ever is locally available to you, but should be as natural as possible.

🌲 Hold the bottle and dirt in your hands and center yourself. Focus you energy into the bottle and invite the earth to put in its own energy. 

🌲 Add other items from around you. These items can add additional effects to your spell. I added pine needles for protection, some dried wildflowers, and berries for regrowth.

🌲 After your bottle is full close it.

🌲 Keep the bottle close to you for the rest of your walk. Allow it to absorb the energy all around you.

Moving Forward

Keep the bottle on your altar, on you, or where ever you need it most. Allow it to project forest energy all around.

Feel free to create a diverse biome of energy be creating more jars with different parts of the forest.

Stripping for an undertaker --

I planted a garden over an undertaker and he told me that

bones grow best above ground. I told him about the cilantro, the pumpkins and the peas, and he

told me that good soil was made after dead things disappeared. I thought about my first love and

the way he decayed into my second love. My second love still reeks. My mother smells him on my breath when I ask her to pick me up, forgetting she lives several hundred miles away now. 

When she asks me why I’ve been drinking, I ask her why hearts are made out of soft tissue and sharp edges. Neither question is answered.

But, they say, decay is good for planting things; the lavender, the rhubarb, the carrots. Gardening is the act of allowing patience to become consumption. 

The undertaker winks – he gives me his phone number and tells me to call when the bones of my last lover lose their marrow. 

The daylight is so bright I can see his gaze on my neck, measuring for a pulse. 

I – search – beneath his feet for some unnourished ground – something a new lover can decay into.

Mimetic Words | Onomatopoeia

Hey guys, today we’re gonna talk about mimetic words and onomatopoeia in Japanese! Mimetic words, just like onomatopoeia, are words that phonetically resemble the source of sound that they’re describing – they mimic sounds, feelings, and senses! You will often see these mimetic words and onomatopoeia in either ひらがな or カタカナ! It doesn’t really matter which one you use.

Animal and Human Sounds・擬声語・ぎせいご:
Bear・ガオー・Roar
Bee・ブーン・Buzz
Cat・ニャー・Meow
Cow・モーモー・Moo
Dog・ワンワン・Woof
Duck・ガーガー・Quack
Fox・コンコン・???
Frog・げろげろ・Ribbit
Horse・ひひいん・Neigh
Monkey・ウキウキ・Oo-oo-aa-aa
Mouse・チューチュー・Squeak
Pig・ブーブー・Oink
Sheep・めーめー・Baa

Child crying loudly・うわーん
Chuckling secretively・ウフフ・(´∀`*)ウフフ
Clearing your throat for attention・おほん
Loud laugh・アハハ
Speaking a foreign language fluently・ぺらぺら
Surprised scream・うぎゃー
Unable to contain laughter・クスクス

Inanimate Objects and Nature Sounds・擬音語・ぎおんご:
You will often see 擬音語used in manga!

Bursting into flames・メラメラ
Heavy rain pouring down・ザーザー
Rock tumbling down a hill・ゴロゴロ
Running at full speed・タタタタ
Stepping on dirt or sand・サクサク
Thunder rumbling・ゴロゴロ
Water bubbling gently・こぽこぽ

Movement and Motion・擬容語
 ・ぎようご:
Asleep・ぐっすり
Fast paced walking・すたこら
Joints shaking・がくがく
Nodding off・うとうと
Trembling from cold, fear, or anger・ブルブル
Wandering aimlessly・ウロウロ

Feelings・擬情語・ぎじょうご:
Excited from anticipation・わくわく
Fascinated by something beautiful・うっとり
Happy, full of hope・うきうき
Running around hurriedly・あたふた
Throbbing pain・ずきずき
Worrying about the past・くよくよ
Worrying or wondering what to do・もやもや

Onomatopoeia・オノマト:
Banging・ごんごん
Chubby・ぽっちゃり
Grass rustling・わさわさ
Gushing water・ごぼごぼ
Knocking・こんこん
Loud snoring・ぐーぐー
Long yawn・ふわ~
Moving slowly・のそり
Rough・ざらざら
Rustling・ばらばら
Smooth / Silky・さらさら
Strong cough・ごほん
Suddenly waking up・がばっ
Tapping・とんとん
Vomiting・げっ
Wandering around aimlessly・のらりのらり

Journal Prompts: 15 Things to Collect in Your Journal.

1) tea tags- line them up and describe what you thought of each flavour.

2) tea and coffee stains- Write over each one a bit about what it was and where you were when you drank it.  

3) Pressed flowers- Write where you picked them, try to identify what kind of flowers they are.

4) Postage stamps- Line them up and describe what each was affixed to. 

5) Buisiness cards from restaurants you’ve visited- describe who you were with and what you ate. 

6) Post cards (even local ones)- describe where you were and what you thought of it. 

7) Sand and Dirt smudges from parks and beaches (affix with glue)- describe who you were with and give a point form about the adventure. 

8) Daily horoscopes from the newspaper- write about how right or wrong the prediction was. 

9) Fruit stickers- line them up and label which fruit each came from. 

10) Samples from your favourite art supplies- give a short description of the style and model. 

11) Paragraphs you’ve written for school- highlight parts you are proud of and add thoughts where you left some out. 

12) Labels from your favourite foods- describe why you like it, how you eat it, and how often. 

13) Tags from new clothes- describe why you like it, try to draw what it looks like on you or an outfit you will pair it with. 

14) Nail Polish- make a few splotches of your most used colours and label them accordingly. 

15) Receipts- Cut off just the top part with the name of the business printed on it, write a little about what you bought and when, and who you were with at the time. 

anonymous asked:

Spell to Connect to forest! Please ❤

Awesome! Okay!

Originally posted by arcusxx

Inner Forest Jar - 

This recipe is to bring to mind the forest and can be used as a substitute for a forest.

Ingredients - 

  • 1 cup Dirt or craft sand
  • 1 pine cone/bunch of needles and/or an acorn
  • 1 tsp river water or purified water
  • 1 inch of moss (wild-crafted, or craft supplies)
  • a smooth stone, preferably from a forest
  • 1 jar
  • twine (for aesthetics)
  • 1 candle and/or incense that reminds you of the forest 

Step 1 - Prepare your ingredients and create your space for magic, however your normally do it. Then light your incense and a candle. Play soothing forest sounds, maybe add some rain (check out Rainy Mood).

Step 2 - Think of being in the forest, and add your dirt/sand by hand into your jar. Feel the earth in your hands. Smell the dirt. Next add a few drops of your water and smell the way the dirt changes scents (just enough to get it damp, not to make mud).

Step 3 - Add your stone, and then place your moss on the stone. think of the boulders and trees you see with moss growing on them in the forest. Add a pine cone or needles, smell the sap, and see the trees. Add an acorn and think of the way life grows in the forest. 

Step 4 - Pass the jar through the incense or over the candle 3 times. Chant or envision the jar turning into your forest. This jar is a safe place for a forest to grow. Place the lid on the jar and wrap the twine around the top three times, sealing the forest inside of the jar. 

Now you have a mini forest in a jar! Use as a mediation method or to bring the energy of the forest to spells or altars. Open the lid and breath in the scent of the forest to calm down. If anything sprouts, such as the pine cones or acorn, or the moss grows, you can return them to the forest the next time you visit, or plant outside/in a pot.

Thank for the suggestion!

We Have More Time

Ooops.  My hand slipped…

Warnings:  Wonder Woman Spoilers, Extreme Peril?

Rated: M (for non-explicit sexy times and language)  

Fix it that I might be persuaded to continue??? Y’all know what I like.  ;)   There’s a read more down there somewhere.  

779 words

Diana Prince/Steve Trevor

Thank you @bloomsoftly for looking this over for me!  <3  

His finger was on the trigger.  He closed his eyes and thought about Diana.   

Steve Trevor had known he loved her the moment he laid eyes on her.  From the second he’d sputtered alive again, coughing the sea water from his lungs and looking into the eyes of an indescribably beautiful woman. He’d been in love even then.

But of course the only time he could think to tell her was when he’d made up his mind.  Do nothing or do something.  And his ‘something’ had turned him into a dead man walking.    

She couldn’t even hear him.  Her ears were ringing.  He knew that look well.

Maybe it was better this way.  Maybe he’d even done it on purpose.  Sounded like him.  He always got it wrong.  Or maybe he got it just right. Either way, it was typical.  

He pushed all of that out of his mind.  He had seconds left on this earth and he wanted to spend it thinking about her. 

Keep reading

In-depth: the Lanchester & Sten

After the British Expeditionary Force’s retreat from Dunkirk in June 1940, Germany was expected to attempt a full-scale invasion of Britain. In order to accomplish this, they would need to eliminate the Royal Air Force, and as such, the RAF’s airfields were at serious risk. The RAF wanted a Schmeisser-type submachine gun issued to their personnel in the event of an attack from German paratroopers. The Navy had already ordered 2000 Smith & Wesson 9mm carbines and the Army, who by now had realized that they had vastly underestimated the military effectiveness of the submachine gun, began buying Thompsons from the United States.


The Biwarip machine carbine, an early precursor to the Sten made in 1938 and tested by the Small Arms Committee. Remarkably modern for its time.


The RAF initially examined captured MP-38s and ordered 10,000 British-made copies, but there were complications that resulted not only in the weapons being changed from copies of the MP-38 to the MP-28, but also the order being increased to 50,000 to satisfy the Navy as well, who had been forced to abandon the S&W carbines due to serious malfunctions. Sterling Armaments Co. was contracted to produce the initial prototypes of the MP-28 copy. The resultant weapon was finished, in the form of two pilot guns, in late 1940 and demonstrated on the 8th of November. The pilot guns were designed by George Lanchester and thus were named after him.


Lanchester Pilot Gun 3. For whatever reason, this model appears to have no rear sights. It was tested in November 1940.


Lanchester Pilot Gun 4. This is the model used for endurance trials and was essentially the finished product. Tested on the 28th of November 1940.


The Lanchester pilot guns were tested again on the 13th of November 1940 and were tested with a variety of 9x19mm catridges, including Winchester flat-nose, ICI, Bergmann, Beretta, and German military issue. The first pilot gun failed to discharge the Winchester and ICI ammunition, but the second did not run into any major issues and was considered on-par with the German MP-38.

On November 28th, further trials of the Lanchester pilot guns took place in the presence of both George Lanchester and Major Reginald V. Shepherd of the Design Department at RSAF Enfield. The Lanchester was now in its fourth pilot gun form and fired 5204 rounds with 26 stoppages. It passed all the mandatory tests but did not function when loaded with Beretta-made ammunition. Otherwise it was considered good to go and production rights were handed over to the Royal Navy for immediate manufacture as the Lanchester Mk.I. This weapon was issued to the Air Force and Navy until 1941, when it was simplified as the Mk.I*, which had no fire selector and fixed iron sights.


The Lanchester Mk.I. Known as the “British Schmeisser”. It was heavy, sturdy, and solidly built - typical of Naval manufacture.


The Lanchester Mk.I*. Fully-automatic only with fixed iron sights. Many Mk.I*s were simply modified Mk.Is, but were not marked as such.


The Lanchester was good but production costs were too high to equip the army. Something cheaper and quicker to manufacture was sought. In January 1941, an extremely simplified model was designed by George Lanchester and demonstrated at Enfield on the 10th of January 1941, and at Hythe on the 21st. The prototype was essentially a Lanchester stripped down to the bare minimum. It consisted of a simple tubular body made from steel and grips made from Tufnel. It was supposed to have a folding buttstock but for whatever reason this was never fitted. The only real change to the base design was the inclusion of a fire selector just in front of the trigger grouping. Otherwise it was internally the same as the Lanchester Mk.I.

A second simplified prototype was also conceived by George Lanchester and differed in that the cocking slot was now on the left side of the gun and had a much lighter bolt which was about an inch shorter than the original. The grips were redesigned to be more ergonomic, and a simple single-strut stock was fitted to the rear of the pistol grip.


The first simplified Lanchester prototype. Essentially the forerunner to the Sten. The cocking slot has a safety recess.


The second simplified Lanchester prototype. This version had left-hand cocking and a three-position fire selector.


Both simplified prototypes of the Lanchester were tested but rejected. But from this concept, the Sten was born. It was developed in early 1941 by Major Shepherd and Harold J. Turpin, who worked at the Design Department at Enfield. Thus the weapon was christened the STEN (Shepherd, Turpin, ENfield). The design was an incredibly simple blowback system based on the Lanchester with a fixed firing pin and simple cylindrical bolt. The first version of the Sten, the Mk.I, had wooden furniture, a conical flash hider, and a hinged fore grip, a feature not seen on any of the subsequent models. The Mk.I was cheaper than the Lanchester but still too expensive; it was simplified further as the Mk.I* in late 1941. The Mk.I* ditched the wooden embellishments, the flash hider and the fore grip feature. Throughout 1941, over 100,000 Mk.I and Mk.I* Stens were produced and issued to the army.


The Sten Mk.I. The original model of the Sten, with features such as a folding fore grip and a flash hider that were not seen in later models.


The Sten Mk.I*. The first of many steps to simplifying an already very basic gun. Although production was somewhat brief, thousands were made.


In mid-1941, the Mk.II Sten was designed. It was a bare-bones version of a gun which was already very basic. The main difference between the Mk.I and the Mk.II Stens was that the Mk.II had a new barrel that could not be interchanged with the original Mk.I barrel. The Mk.II barrel had only two grooves whereas the Mk.I had six. Externally, the Mk.II was incredibly minimalist. There were two main versions of the Mk.II produced: one with a wireframe stock and one with a single-strut stock. Neither were particularly pleasant to shoot, owing to the poor ergonomics. The upshot of all this was that the Mk.II Sten was incredibly cheap to produce en masse for the army and, as an added bonus, proved very easy for anti-Nazi partisans to copy in workshops.

The Mk.II Sten was tested at Pendine on from the 7th to the 25th of August 1941 and a glaring fault was discovered. The magazines were made from stamped sheet metal, which meant that the feed lips were prone to failure. If the magazine feed lips were misaligned even slightly with the magazine well, the gun would jam. The magazines were also highly susceptible to dirt and sand. All of this basically meant that the Mk.II Sten was highly unreliable if not handled with care, and even then it was probably inevitable that it would fail at some point during the heat of battle. But the army was faced with a choice between a mass of unreliable Mk.IIs, or a handful of Thompsons, Lanchesters and Mk.I Stens. They opted for the former.


The Sten Mk.II. The most successful version of the Sten, with several millions being manufactured during the war and used by various countries.


The Sten Mk.II with bayonet and single-strut stock.


Prototype T42 submachine gun, based on the Sten Mk.II. It had a single-column magazine and a redesigned trigger group.



Sten Mk.II with SMLE stock. This was made as an experimental model only and never issued.


Sten Mk.II with wireframe pistol grip, designed for paratroopers.


Copy of the Sten Mk.II made in a workshop by Danish partisans.


The Mk.II Sten was by far the most successful model of the Sten gun, with over 2,000,000 being produced throughout World War II. It was first issued to British and Canadian troops during the raid on Dieppe on the 19th of August 1942 and continued to be issued until 1945. It was also issued in considerable numbers to the Free French Forces, including the French Resistance.

In 1943, the toy manufacturer Line Brothers Ltd. were contracted to produce the Mk.III Sten, which was made from a single, riveted sheet metal tube that was welded at the top. The ejection also had an extra safety precaution that consisted of a simple finger guard. The barrel was fixed inside the tubular body, which could not be disassembled. In Canada, the Mk.III was manufactured by Long Branch Arsenal.


The Sten Mk.III. Manufactured by Line Bros. Yet another simplification to lower the cost of manufacture.


On the other hand, this prototype Mk.III with a wooden SMLE-style stock would have been substantially more expensive to manufacture.


An experimental Mk.III made at Enfield. The trigger grouping is level with the ejection and the cocking handle is on top.


The Mk.IV was the only one of the Sten “marks” not to be issued to the army. In fact, it never evolved past the prototype stage. It was designed in 1943 with paratroopers in mind, with a shorter barrel and folding stock. The first version of the Mk.IV had a conical flash hider and a very unusual pistol grip and trigger guard arrangement that was designed to facilitate for thick winter gloves. It was a mere 27 inches in length. After it was trialed at Pendine at rejected for improvements, a second version known as the Mk.IVB was developed which was designed to be fired with one hand. To achieve this, the balance of the weapon was changed by moving the trigger grouping forward to the middle of the gun. The trigger mechanism had to be completely redesigned to allow this. It was 24 inches in length but uncomfortable to fire. Besides its flaws, there was no immediate requirement for the Mk.IV model so it was never developed any further.


The Sten Mk.IV. Produced as a prototype only. It was designed for paratroopers and soldiers operating in cold weather conditions.


The Sten Mk.IVB. Designed to be fired one-handed. The shortest version of the Sten by far, it was more a machine pistol than a submachine gun.


The Sten Mk.IVS. A silenced prototype of which only one was ever made.


In 1944, the Mk.V Sten appeared. It was a much more presentable weapon and a far cry from the crude Mk.II  The Mk.V featured a wooden butt, pistol grip and fore grip. The fore grip was ditched in later models. The front sights were also redesigned and lifted from the No.4 SMLE service rifle. Internally, the bolt was improved with a cutaway that cleared the trigger disconnector when the bolt came over the sear. The resultant weapon was of excellent quality and made to a much higher standard than its precursors. Unfortunately, cheaply-made magazine were still being issued and consequently the Mk.V was still just as liable to failure as the earlier models, although this was not the fault of the gun itself.

The Mk.V Sten was issued extensively to paratroopers after D-Day and saw considerable use during Operation Market Garden in Arnhem, and issue of the Mk.V continued until the war in Europe ended in May 1945.


An early model Mk.V. This version had a fore grip which was not seen on later models. The stock could be detached for paratroopers.


The Sten Mk.V. The most polished version of the Sten manufactured during the war. It was much more reliable than the Mk.II and was issued in 1944.


Many variations of silenced Sten guns were also developed. British interest in silenced weapons began in 1940 when British Commandos demanded a quiet gun for eliminating lone sentries during covert raids. Initially they were issued silenced Thompsons made by RSAF Enfield, but these were too heavy and expensive to deploy in any numbers. When the Sten Mk.II appeared, Enfield developed a suppressed model called the Mk.IIS. It was designed by a Polish exile who was now serving with the Special Operations Executive, Lt. Kulikowski. The suppressor consisted of a series of metal cups wrapped around and in front of the barrel, with a rubber plug at the end. When the weapon was fired, the gases seeped out the sidewall of the barrel and their energy dissipated. The bullet traveled through the metal cups and penetrated the plug, which prevented the gases from escaping. These metal cups were encased in a perforated jacket which was surrounded by an additional jacket.


Prototype Mk.IIS. The silencer contained 24 baffles. With so much weight at the front end and so little in the stock, it would have been awkward to handle.


The Sten Mk.IIS. The most successful silenced weapon of World War II.


The Mk.IIS was issued to Commandos, the SOE, and other British special forces units, as well as resistance fighters across Europe. It was designed to be fired in single shots. Reportedly, the sound of the bolt was louder than the gunshot itself. The main drawback of the Mk.IIS was that it had an effective range of only 100 meters.


Sten Mk.II with an SOE-made silencer and basic wooden stock, issued to special agents in France.


The Sten Mk.VI. Basically the Mk.IIS principle applied to the Sten Mk.V. It replaced the Mk.IIS late in the war.


Late in the war, the Mk.V Sten was successfully silenced using a similar principle and this model was called the Mk.VI. It did not see as much use as the Mk.IIS but was probably, all factors considered, the best silenced weapon of the war. It was succeeded by the Sterling L34A1 silent submachine gun.

Writing 101: The Ultimate World Building Answer Sheet

I know a lot of you are budding writers, and I know a lot of people put world-building up there as one of the toughest things to do.

Below the cut is an EXHAUSTIVE list of questions that, as a writer, you should be able to answer. By the end of the book, unless information is privileged for plot reasons, your readers should be able to answer a lot of this too (some stuff is more plot-specific). A big part of world-building is just making sure you are aware before you begin writing it, and you can drop hints in here and there as throwaways and descriptions.

This is not character building, so much as world-building and information you can use to build auxiliary characters that aren’t necessarily mains in your story. This list is based on sci-fi/fantasy for the most part, in non-earth worlds.

I’ve tried to arrange the list into some kind of order, but if you just sit down and write out an answer to each question, i promise you’ll find it helps you later on. You don’t need to specifically answer each question within your story, but just sitting down and writing it all out, even if you already KNOW your setting, might really help solidify your vision down the line.

Apologies to those on mobile who are subjected to the full list :)

Keep reading

Lesson 3: Witchcraft 101

Terminology and Basic Theory

By: Headmistress Trick

Live class date and time: 1/3/2017 @ 4:40pm

As with all things in the pagan community, I advise you research twice then come to your own conclusions. Your craft is YOUR CRAFT, this may not be a perfect fit for you, that it okay. We are all  the tailors of our own spiritual clothes.

This course will cover basic terms and tools, the beginner’s theory and practice of simple rituals and how to construct your own spells.

Things that will NOT be covered in this course: In-depth explanations of the various areas of magic. I will provide a basic grand overview, but the purpose of this class is not to delve into any one concentration of practice. If something you hear strikes your interest, please feel free to ask me for more information. If I don’t know about what you’re asking, I’ll find someone that does.


The Basics

The only thing you need to cast any spells whatsoever, is a witch. If you’re sitting in for this course, that’s probably you. You can call yourself any title you choose, practitioner, wizard, sorcerer, magician, crazy person, spiritualist, whatever… Anyway, to perform magick, that is the manipulation of energies to bring about an intended result. This can be done with or without the assistance of deities or entities outside one’s self.

Generally all workers,  even secular ones, have some sort of altar to use as a work space. These are highly personal spaces. They can be simple, grand, portable, stationary, cluttered, clean, whatever you like. It doesn’t have to be fancy or expensive. In traditional Wicca, every tool has a place on the altar. This is by no means is something most practitioners still prescribe to. What you choose to have and use in your practice can be as minimalist or extravagant as you like. You can have all the tools or none of them. It is entirely up with you.

Statues, fetishes (these are small carvings,) or some kind of physical representation of gods or goddesses. Many consider this to be the house that you invite spirits, deities, or entities to inhabit when calling them for spells or rituals. Obviously if you’re secular this won’t be part of your practice.

Candles- Let’s be honest, an altar without a single candle, led or traditional, is a rare one indeed. They’ve a million uses in spells and have their own branch of magic aptly called candle magic.

Bowl- For keeping stuff in. When doing an elemental spell this is usually used to hold water, sand, salt, or dirt, but it can hold anything that needs containing.

Athame- This is a ritual knife. Some people use swords or daggers, some people use a grubby old pocket knife given to them by their great uncle. This is generally used for cutting or directing energy. It is not always sharp and there is a little bit of argument about whether it should be used for non-ritual purposes. Some say daily use dulls the magick inside it, others say it enhances it. I say, it is your knife, use it for what you like.

Bolline- A utility knife actually used for cutting physical objects. If you use your Athame as a functional knife you probably don’t need this.

Cauldron- If ever there was an image of a witch it was an old crone bent over a cauldron stirring away at something nasty bubbling over a fire. These can be used for bubbling toil and trouble, but also for a holding place for burning things.

Wand- Generally a thin stick thing for pointing and directing energy. This can be a myriad of objects from one’s fingers, pencils, spoons, actual sticks or specially crafted wands. Don’t let anyone tell you something can’t be a wand.

Mortar and Pestle- A small bowl with a little club for crushing, grinding and mixing herbs and spices. Be advised that wood, plastics and porous stones can pick up scents and flavours from the things you put in them. Do not use the same set for non-edible items that you do for ones you intend on eating.

Chalice- Fancy cup. Usually used for offering drinks to entities or passing around the group in a coven ritual. Traditionally this is in a goblet shape, but I’ve used a coffee cup in a pinch. Make sure whatever you use is food safe and easy to wash. Do not leave offerings sitting it until they get fuzzy.

Incense- This is sometimes used to represent air in elemental workings. It is best to avoid purely synthetic scents when possible. These will require some kind of holder. A fireproof container filled with sand can serve just as well in a pinch. If working in a group please be sure to ask about allergies and sensitivities to scents.

Grimoire- This is a witch’s go to book for all things that are important enough to write down. Just like a woman’s purse, one should never open and look through another person’s grimoire without express permission. Taking things that are not freely given from it is dangerous at best.

Broom- Used for sweeping energies, especially negative ones. Is wonderful for dissipating said energies.  Not for flying on. Sweep your floor and get the dust out along with the bad stuff.

Drums/bells- Sound can be useful for wards, driving away negative energy and calling attention. They’re also great for keeping time when dancing in a group.

Baskets, bottles, bins- For keeping stuff in. Don’t laugh.

Bucket of water/fire extinguisher- Candles can go from representations of fire to “oh shit my house is on fire” very quick. Safety first.

Stones, crystals, cords, fabric, oils, herbs, salt, flour, chalk - spell ingredients. They’ll end up everywhere unless you contain them in the baskets, bottles and bins I mentioned earlier.  DO NOT CAST CIRCLES OUTSIDE USING SALT. IT WILL KILL WILDLIFE.

Ritual Clothes- Special clothing is by no means a requirement, actually some people say this separates them too far from their craft, like putting on a costume. Others say it enhances the ritual experience for them. Whatever you are comfortable wearing should be what you practice in. Skyclad is a way of referring to being naked, by the way.

Divination tools- Tarot cards, runes, scrying mirrors, crystal balls, tea leaves. Only needed when planning on doing divination.

While none of these things are required to perform any spells, they can be helpful. No beginner should feel they have to break the bank to get a bunch of items they may or may not use. Be wary of materials of anything that will be touching your mouth or eyes. Cheap antique metals especially can sometimes contain lead. Used bookshops, thrift stores, flea markets and yard sales can be gold mines for things to use in your craft.

Many practitioners believe in cleansing and consecrating their tools before using them. They feel any strange energies coming into their space that wasn’t invited can contaminate their spells. There are as many methods of purification as there are stars in the sky, but some common methods are

Ground, cast a circle and call whatever energies into play that you wish to work with. Hold the item above your work space and “sweep” or “cut” away any unwanted energies while calling for the negative to be dispersed. Then you can set the item down onto your altar and  fill it with good energies and intents.

Smoke cleansing, passing a fireproof item briefly through candle flame, bathing in water (charged, rain or crystal water are commonly used for this practice), leaving it in direct sun or moonlight for a few hours or burying overnight in clean soil are also common ways of dealing with negative energies. Some believe a simple spiritual wipe down is all you need.

I have heard some practitioners say the repeat this process any time they use a tool in a ritual, and some simply when they feel the need recharging.

Whatever process you choose, make sure it is safe for you to use on the item and that you feel completely comfortable doing it. If you go into it with uncertainty or negative feelings, you’ll just be imbuing those into the item instead of cleaning it.

Now that you know what kind of tools you might be using, you probably are curious what kinds of magic you can perform. I by no means believe this is a completely comprehensive list. I’m only human after all.

Astral work- The art of using one’s mind to expand your presence and travel beyond one’s physical body.

Black/Dark/ Left Hand Path- This generally is anything that falls outside of the realm of white magic. This can include work that deals with death, blood, hexes, and gathering of power. Not always evil, not always good. This sometimes includes working with demons or fae, but certainly not always.

Cosmic- The use of planetary or celestial bodies in influencing one’s magical workings.

Candle- The use of color and shape correspondences in spells that use candles extensively.

Crystal/Stone/Lapidary- The use of correspondences of types of stones and gems in spells, using the natural energies found within  rock.

Herbalism/Green magic- The use of growing things to make your potions, spells and other magical workings. This generally includes gardening at some point.

Kitchen/Hearth/Cottage- This is household magic. Spells are woven into everyday cooking, cleaning and household tasks. This is a very vast area of magic that can encompass many other sections.

Knot/Cord/String- The use of string and cord for creating spells or charms. A very portable type of spellcasting.

Music/Sound- The use of singing, humming, playing musical instruments or otherwise creating sounds for spells.

Divination- Attempting to foretell the future through various means such as tarot, runes, scrying, reading tea leaves or palmistry.

Sigils, Symbols and Runes- Visual representations of concepts and intents in one’s craft. This can include esoteric alphabets and occult imagery.

Elemental- Working with one or all of the elements to bring about one’s intentions.

Weather- Working in conjunction with and influencing the weather

White/Light- Generally any magic that does not fall into the somewhat unsavory realm of “bad” magic. This does not mean this is the only right kind of magic to do.

There are literal hundreds of types and branches of magic, including specific pantheons of deities that I am not going to cover here, and ethnic or regional types of crafts. I always encourage you to seek out more information on your own.

Before we wind down I want to go over some other common terms that may or may not come up

Familiar- A companion, usually animal, that serves as a host to a spiritual entity or energy. They assist with workings and are generally good to have around. Please take good care of your familiars if you have them.

Coven- A group of witches or practitioners. You do not need one if you don’t want one, but they can be a great support group.

Spell- The working of magic itself.

Incantation- The spoken bit of the spell, absolutely does not have to rhyme, though that can help with memory recall. This can be in any language, though one you’re familiar with would probably be best.

Charm- An object that is created to hold an enchantment, usually carried or worn by the intended recipient.

Channeling- The controversial process of becoming host to another spirit of entity.

Three Fold Rule- The idea that whatever you send out will return to you three times over. This applies to both the good and the bad.

Potion- A mixture of ingredients usually meant to be swallowed by the person the magic is supposed to effect. Please never make a potion out of toxic or dangerous ingredients.

Ointment/Salve- Lotiony sort of stuff that goes on your skin.

Poultice- Soft wet mass of stuff you put on your skin. Usually contains herbs and other ingredients bound together with moss, gauze or flour and held on with a cloth wrapped around the body part

Correspondence- The relation between an item and the energy it influences. Like a type of stone being handy for working with psychic energies, or healing. Black candles being good for banishment and cleansing.  These are not always agreed upon by every magic user.

Enchant- to fill an item with energy or intention

Grounding- The release of negative energy and reaffirming one’s personal boundary of energy and influence

Sabbat- A festival, holiday or gathering for celebratory or ritual reasons

Pentagram vs Pentacle – If you are involved in craft that uses the star in the circle emblem, you should know that a pentagram is just the star, the pentacle is the whole thing within the circle. Calling it a pentagram makes you look like an ill informed goth kid. Always be a well informed goth kid.

Casting a circle- the act of creating both physical and metaphysical barriers for energies.

Shielding/ Warding- the creating of a protective barrier between your target and bad/unwanted things.

Binding- The attempt to hold someone or something and keep it from performing any harmful or unwanted actions.

Banishment/Purification- Casting out of bad energies or influences

Calling the Corners- The concept that the cardinal directions correspond to guardians or spiritual entities and calling upon them to serve as protectors for a ritual

Offerings/Sacrifices- Objects that are surrendered to an entity. Do not perform any kind of animal or blood sacrifice without fully understanding what you are doing and warning anyone else that might be involved in the process. Food, drinks, gifts and offerings of effort are generally more than enough to appease deities or spirits.

Please if you have any questions, please let me know. I will not be answering any questions about specific regional or cultural craft that I am unfamiliar with, but will try to find you resources or someone to speak to about them.

We will be reconvening for class on Sunday to do basic spellwork and go over some common correspondences. We will be doing a simple protection charm so please find an item you wish to enchant. It can be an item you use and keep on you daily or a found item. Any other things you would like to bring to share with the class of your own workings would be wonderful. Thank you and I hope you learned something new.

Australian summer, in my experience:
  • Weird, semi-unpredictable weather.
  • Merry fucking Christmas, snow-related imagery is traditional so let’s taunt you with pictures of cold things while you’re at risk of sudden combustion.
  • Family’s nude, if I wasn’t so dysphoric I would be too.
  • There is no cold tap in summer. No matter which one you use for water, the water will still be hot.
  • Chickens laid eggs, which were just brought inside, but are already hard-boiled somehow.
  • The chocolate is melting.
  • The butter is a small yellow greasy pool.
  • The pavement is melting.
  • That fire’s so far away it’ll never get here, air’s still full of smoke though.
  • You just went to bed so now there are 1000% more mosquitoes to buzz around your ear.
  • Fuck, there’s a bee in the living room!
  • Fuck, there’s a bird in the living room!
  • FUCK THERE’S A SCORPION IN THE LIVING ROOM
  • FUCK THERE’S A BABY VENOMOUS SNAKE IN THE LIVING ROOM
  • WHY IS ALL THIS DAMN WILDLIFE IN THE LIVING ROOM?!
  • Dry and windy and now the dirt, the sand, the ground itself is airborne.
  • Walking through a dust storm to get to your mailbox. Great, now your clothes are full of sand.
  • The dirt is full of iron, it’s red, so when there are dust storms it can look like the apocalypse.
  • And then there was sudden hail. Since it’s still summer, the small pile of ice on the ground melts quickly.
  • HELLO AND WELCOME TO THUNDERSTORM
Elemental Spell Ideas

Most of the time, I try to do spellwork with the intent aligned with a specific element in order to use the energy of that element.Here are some ideas for choosing a type of spell based on its elemental alignment.

Water

  • charge herbs, stones, etc and throw into a moving body of water, such as a river, stream, or ocean. You can use a pond or lake, but I think the moving water has more effect.
  • Take a ritual bath with oils or herb blends suited for your purpose. The bath itself is cleansing, and soaking in the herbs, oils, and water while focusing on intent/chanting can be super powerful.
  • Carve runes or sigils into soap or bath bomb and use in bath. As the runes/sigil disappear, the spell is released.
  • Draw sigils into dirt with a stick/finger, let rain wash it away or pour water over it to release (this is also an earth spell)
  • Make teas/potions with edible(be careful!) herbs
  • Do a blessing or chant over wine or other beverages for yourself or to share any time (kitchen witchery is fantastic!)
  • Wash items with blessed and charged water to cleanse and purify. This can be ritual tools or just anything that you feel needs to be cleansed of negative energy.

Earth

  • Carve names, words, runes or sigils, into fruit and bury in a pot of dirt or in the ground. Good for things that you want to have manifest slowly.
  • For permanent effect, bury something that will not decompose, such as a stone or a glass bottle filled with items, herbs, images, etc.
  • Carve spells into wood or burn symbols into wood.
  • Recharge stones by burying them in dirt, sand, or salt
  • Collect dirt or sand from locations with good energy to use in rituals
  • Cooking! Specifically baking. (this can also be a fire spell, depending on what your’re making)

Air

  • Make incense
  • Place charms and other charged items in high locations or tie them onto tree branches
  • Astral or dream work
  • Create wind chimes or charms to hang in windows or outside near your home
  • Use incense to cleanse items and banish negative energy from your home 

Fire

  • Write sigils, names, words, runes, etc on paper and burn. This can be used for manifestation or banishing
  • Use bonfires to raise energy
  • Fire gazing or fire scrying
  • Candle magick
  • Sex magick
  • Burn carves wax figures for banishing
  • Write on bay leaves and burn or place on an incense coal
  • Again, cooking!

These are just my associations and methods that I find useful. There are of course countless other options!

A Curse to Lose Inspiration

anonymous asked:

Hey, do you know any curses/binding spells to make someone lose inspiration for something? It wouldn’t have to be too intense. Thanks~

I didn’t happen to know of any curses specifically for this, nor was I able to find any either. Rather than send another anon off with another “I can’t help, I’m sorry” message, I took this as an opportunity to actually make some original content. And figures, it’s a curse. 

So, here we go!

A Curse to Lose Inspiration

Create a poppet of your target. Insert a taglock in its chest, or draw a likeness of their face on the poppet’s head. 

Some ideas for taglocks: hair, nail clippings, a copy of their handwriting, an object of theirs, a picture of them, a copy of their fingerprint, etc.

Draw a curse sigil for losing inspiration and wrap it around the taglock. Alternatively, draw it on the back of the poppet’s head, opposite of the face (if you drew one).

Fill the inside of the head with cotton balls, to fog up their mind and muddle their thoughts. You could, alternatively, tangle up some string into a ball to have their thoughts tangled and confused.

Weigh down the poppet’s limbs with sand or dirt, so the target is heavy, sluggish, and unmotivated to do the things they need to do.

If you have access to any [poisonous herbs], you can put some in the chest of the poppet to “poison” their creativity and drive.

Remember to always, always, always research any poisonous herbs you plan to use thoroughly, and take whatever precautions necessary to keep yourself safe - you don’t want to hurt yourself just to hurt someone else!

Seal the poppet shut, with the intentions of trapping all the negativity inside them, and preventing any inspiration from going in.

Finally, pop that poppet in a jar, and fill it with honey or molasses - some sort of viscous liquid - to keep the target stuck.

Put the jar in a dark place, to keep them in the dark.