san francisco museum of art

nytimes.com
Text for Happiness. Or Sadness. Get Art Back.
A playful project using cellphone texts and art turns into a viral hit — as well as a window into our cultural soul.

Y’all, this is one of the coolest things I’ve ever heard of. The San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SF MOMA) has set up a project where you can text 57251 and it’ll send you something from its collection that matches the word or emoji you asked for. It’s not “complete,” but it’s evolving as it goes on, and it’s a really neat way to discover art you might not have found otherwise. All you have to do is text “send me” followed by a word or emoji, and it’ll send you a piece of art! You can also text things like “send me something happy,” and it’ll return things like a portrait of a dog and a woman laughing in a car. 10/10, would recommend.

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The Beat Poetry Museum in San Francisco, California.

I fell in love with this place on my trip to California in May, and talked to some of the most interesting and amazing people. Can’t wait to go back one day.

Erased de Kooning Drawing

What do you need to transform a de Kooning into a Rauschenberg? 1 month and 40 erasers.

In 1953, Rauschenberg asked artist Willem de Kooning, an Abstract Expressionist painter whom he admired, for a drawing to erase. De Kooning agreed, selecting a drawing that he thought would be particularly difficult to rub out. Rauschenberg claimed that it took him a month, and about 40 erasers, to complete the job. He kept the erased drawing in his studio for two years. In 1955, when he was invited to submit a drawing to show at the Elinor Poindexter Gallery, Jasper Johns persuaded him to exhibit it. Johns placed the drawing in a gold frame and produced the work’s inscription.

See more Rauschenberg: Among Friends collaborations at mo.ma/2s54Npr.

[Robert Rauschenberg with Willem de Kooning and Jasper Johns. Erased de Kooning Drawing. 1953. A de Kooning drawing, graphite, and other media on paper, erased by Rauschenberg and mounted in a gilded wood frame with label inscribed using a metal template in blue ink on paper by Jasper Johns. San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. Purchase through a gift of Phyllis C. Wattis. Photo: Ben Blackwell. © 2017 Robert Rauschenberg Foundation]

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Free Digital Art Publications!

Art publications are expensive to produce and difficult to update. Because of this, the Getty Foundation has worked with a handful of collaborators such as the Art Institute of Chicago, the Walker Art Center, and the Los Angeles County Museum of Art to help solve this problem. Check out the list of completely free publications below. 

Living Collections Catalogue: On Performativity from the Walker Art Center.

The Rauschenberg Research Project from San Francisco Museum of Modern Art.

Monet Paintings and Drawings at the Art Institute of Chicago from the Art Institute of Chicago.

Renoir Paintings and Drawings at the Art Institute of Chicago from the Art Institute of Chicago.

The Camden Town Group in Context from the Tate.

The World of the Japanese Illustrated Book from the Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery, Smithsonian Institution.

Southeast Asian Art at LACMA from the Los Angeles County Museum of Art.

Dutch Paintings of the Seventeenth Century from the National Gallery of Art.

Chinese Painting & Calligraphy from the Seattle Art Museum.

Willem van Aelst - Flowers in a Silver Vase

1663

oil on canvas

Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco

Watch on storm-monsta.tumblr.com

(via https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IqzZP9UBpL0)

Ya’ll not ready.