san antonio alamo

List of abortion clinics in Texas:

Austin:

Austin Women’s Health Center

512-443-2888

Planned Parenthood-Austin

512-276-8000

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Dallas:

Planned Parenthood- Dallas

214-373-1868

Southwestern Women’s Surgery Center

214-742-9310 

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Fort Worth:

Whole Woman’s Health of Fort Worth

800-778-2444/ 817-924-6641 

Planned Parenthood-Fort Worth

817-276-8063

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Houston:

Houston Women’s Clinic

713-868-4483

Texas Ambulatory Surgical Center

713-272-6900 

Suburban Women’s Clinic

713-222-9832

Planned Parenthood- Center for Choice and Ambulatory Surgical Center

713-535-2400

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McAllen:

Whole Woman’s Health

956-686-2137

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San Antonio:

Alamo Women’s Reproductive Services

210-816-2307


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For Financial Assistance: 

Nat. Abortion Federation: 1-800-772-9100 

Planned Parenthood: 1-800-230-7526

 Lilith Fund: 1-877-659-4304 ( for areas south of Waco, panhandle, and east and west tx.)

Texas Equal Access Fund: 1-888-854–4852 (dfw, Waco, panhandle, east and west tx.)

West Fund: 915-213-4535 (English) 915-213-4578 (Spanish) (for el paso and surrounding areas)

La Frontera Fund: 956-508-3329. (for the rgv and surrounding areas)

Make sure to ask your clinic if they have any discounts or “hardship” prices if you are unable to afford your procedure.

For Transportation and Lodging:

Fund Texas Choice: 512-900-8908/ 1-844-900-8908

Clinic Access Support Network: 281-947-2276 (Houston only)

The Bridge Collective: 512-524-9822 (Austin area only) 

FOR JUDICIAL BYPASS INFORMATION CALL:

1-866-999-5263

Texas Gothic

- “Remember the Alamo,” people say. They glance toward the horizon with fear in their eyes and plan their yearly pilgrimage to San Antonio.  The Alamo does not like to be forgotten.

- The lake is not natural. It was built as a reservoir, everyone says, but when you go out on your cousin’s boat, you always see strange movements in your wake. In summer, when the water level drops low and lower still, bare branches reach from below the surface, strangely twisted and contorted. The lake lodges close down. Your cousin puts his boat in storage. No one mentions that there are more branches this summer than last. No one mentions how they move even when there’s no wind.

- Each winter, the Northerners come, driving in by the dozens from Michigan and New York and Oregon, even Canada. “We’re getting too old to brave the snow,” they tell you. “It’s so warm here! Such balmy weather. You must love living here year ‘round.” They look somehow thinner than they were when they arrived, eyes fever-bright and fingers twitching nervously. “Such nice weather,” they whisper. “So warm.”

- “Everybody’s somebody in Luckenbach,” proclaims a T-shirt in the back of your closet. You have never been to Luckenbach, and neither has anyone you know. The shirt hangs there as a reminder: someday Luckenbach will call to you, and you will not be able to resist.

- It is fifty degrees out and everyone you pass in the street is in heavy winter gear, as though their skin feels a chill that the thermometer doesn’t register. 

-  In the night, you hear gunshots. “It’s okay,” your mother says. “Just dove hunters.” You  know it’s not dove season, but you go back to bed anyway. It’s better than thinking of alternative reasons for the gunfire.

- After a day of excruciating heat, the skies open and rain pours down. At first, you’re delighted, but as the rain goes on and on, you start calling family members to make sure they’re on high ground. The rivers rise and flow over the roads, dividing the town into a series of islands, and still it rains. There’s a dip in the road at the entrance to your neighborhood, and it fills with water. You count your canned foods and check the weather-proofing on your doors and windows. It is still raining. You no longer remember what dry ground looks like.

- You pass a recent roadkill on the highway. In the split-second glimpse you get of it, it seems too big for a deer. There are too many limbs. A high-pitched ringing starts up in your ears and you quickly look away. When you drive past the spot again later that day, there’s nothing there.

- “Texas-sized,” says the 64-ounce cup you bought at the gas station. “Texas-sized,” brags the diner about its burgers. “Texas-sized,” whispers your neighbor, pointing out the tracks in your lawn. They look like coyote tracks, but they’re ten inches across.

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February 23rd 1836: Battle of the Alamo begins

On this day in 1836, the Battle of the Alamo began between Texan and Mexican soldiers, near the modern city of San Antonio. The Alamo was a former mission founded by Spanish settlers, which, by the nineteenth century, had become a fort for Spanish troops. In the 1820s, Mexico fought a successul war for independence from Spain, which led to increased migration of American citizens into the Mexican province of Texas. As the American population in the area grew, a revolutionary movement gained traction. War eventually broke out in 1835, and early on, Texan volunteer soldiers successfully captured the Alamo garrison from Mexican troops, and with it gained control of San Antonio. While Texas’ commander-in-chief, Sam Houston, was apathetic about keeping the fort, its defenders - including Colonel James Bowie, Lieutenant Colonel William Travis, and famed frontiersman Davy Crockett - insisted on defending the Alamo. Only around 200 soldiers defended the fort, and on February 23rd 1836 were besieged by a formidable Mexican army, numbering thousands of troops, led by General Antonio López de Santa Anna. Despite overwhelming odds, the Texans managed to repel the attack for 13 days, before being overpowered on March 6th, when most of the defenders were killed. Mexican forces thus regained control of the Alamo fort, but Texans rallied around the incident as a symbol of their resistance against Mexican oppression; “Remember the Alamo!” became a popular war cry. In April, Houston’s army - buoyed by new recruits inspired by the Alamo - defeated the Mexicans at San Jacinto, and Texan independence was secured. The Republic of Texas was short-lived, as Texas was annexed as the 28th state of the United States in 1845. The annexation enflamed sectional tensions, as it raised the question of whether the new state would be slave or free. The action also exacerbated underlying tensions between America and Mexico - as Mexico did not recognise Texas’ independence - and led to war in 1846. The Alamo remains a powerful symbolic moment in Texan and American history, having been immortalised in numerous works of fiction; the site of the battle attracts over 2.5 million visitors a year.

Despite the fact that the battle of the Alamo seems to be remembered as some kind of turning point in the Texas Revolution, it’s been said that what the rebels did at the Alamo had, at best, no impact on the war and possibly even made things worse. Historians whose vision of the event isn’t blurred by freedom tears see it as a catastrophic military blunder caused by the rebels refusing to take the advice of smarter men.

6 Iconic Moments In History You’re Picturing All Wrong