same day registration

Same-day voter registration

If you did not register to vote, it might not be too late, depending on where you live. Some states have same-day voter registration, so you can register when you go to vote:

  • Colorado
  • Connecticut
  • District of Columbia
  • Idaho
  • Illinois
  • Iowa
  • Maine
  • Minnesota
  • Montana
  • New Hampshire
  • Wisconsin
  • Wyoming

Of those states, several also have early voting. (That would be CO, DC, ID, IA, IL, ME, MN, MT, WI, WY.) If you need to register and you live in an early voting state, it’s especially important to go early, because you don’t want to encounter a problem that you can’t fix in time, or to hold up the line for other people.

anonymous asked:

Is there still voter suppression today? If so (I wouldn't be surprised if there was), how are we fighting to change that?

Michelle Lee: Voter suppression tactics are still, unfortunately a tool that many use to gain or keep power in our democracy. In 2008 and 2012 increased minority turnout made a huge difference in our elections. African American women’s turnout was the highest of any other demographic at more than 70% in 2012. This increased participation led to the election of the first black president. Since then there have been an unprecedented number of laws proposed by Republican led legislatures. One study shows that some of those measures have worked. There are however efforts to make sure that voters rights are protected. There are challenges in the court systems, voter registration drives and organizations that continue to make sure that accurate information is available to voters. Here is more information on voter protections programs.

William Wan: Really great question! And a very tough one to answer. In fact, I spent almost three weeks down in North Carolina on an investigative story trying to answer it. And I came to the conclusion that yes, in this particular instance in North Carolina, evidence certainly pointed toward an attempt at voter suppression.  in some places and situations, attempts at voter suppression are still happening today.

Some may look at the recent laws by Republicans — efforts like requiring voter ID, reducing early voting, eliminating same-day registration — and buy into the argument that this is about preventing voter fraud (even though studies show voter fraud is virtually nonexistent). Others would say, it’s just politics — what party doesn’t try to pass laws that skew results in its favor?

But I waded through thousands of pages of court documents and talked to almost every major GOP lawmaker involved in passing this particular voting law.  that sure looked like it was specifically targeting black voters to make it harder for them to vote. And The law and the way they crafted it sure looked like an attempt to specifically target black voters to make it harder for them to vote. And what swayed me most were the emails I found from Republican lawmakers parsing through racial voting data even as they were crafting this law a law that could make it harder for certain racial groups to vote. Emails that read like this:

“Is there any way to get a breakdown of the 2008 voter turnout, by race (white and black) and type of vote (early and Election Day)?” a staffer for the state’s Republican-controlled legislature asked in January 2012.

“Is there no category for ‘Hispanic’ voter?” a GOP lawmaker asked in March 2013 after requesting a range of data, including how many voters cast ballots outside their precinct.

And in April 2013, a top aide to the Republican House speaker asked for “a breakdown, by race, of those registered voters in your database that do not have a driver’s license number.”

I came into it as a complete outsider, with no dog in the fight. And I have to say, from what I saw, the evidence pointing to deliberate attempts to suppress voting — at least in this one state — was fairly damning. You can read more about our investigation into that voter ID law here: “Inside the Republican creation of the North Carolina voting bill dubbed the ‘monster’ law”

Locals speak with a mixture of awe and scorn about [DeCoster,] who built an empire from scratch in their backyards—and who has also shown, as one resident told me, a willingness to ‘screw even his best friend to the wall for a buck.’
— 

Joe Fassler, Timeline of Shame: Decades of DeCoster Egg Factory Violations, The Atlantic, September 16, 2010

It looks like DeCoster Egg Farm put $2,500 dollars into the fight against Same Day Voter Registration. Why yes, the same DeCoster Egg Farm that is notorious for worker rights abuses. Why yes, the same DeCoster notorious for putting America’s food supply at catastrophic risk.

I am flattered to know that such a well-accomplished criminal cares about “preserving the integrity” of the ballot.

Get off your asses and preserve your voting rights. Vote Yes on 1.


Same-day voter registration

If you did not register to vote, it might not be too late, depending on where you live. Some states have same-day voter registration, so you can register when you go to vote:

  • Colorado
  • Connecticut
  • District of Columbia
  • Idaho
  • Illinois
  • Iowa
  • Maine
  • Minnesota
  • Montana
  • New Hampshire
  • Wisconsin
  • Wyoming

If this is you, you’re lucky it’s not too late! Go vote, and show other states why it’s important to make the vote more accessible, not less.

orchidlabia-deactivated20161108  asked:

I'm a first time voter, wtf do I do?

Take a look at this post I shared earlier today. Info courtesy of cspanjunkie.

Here is some great information about same-day voter registration, voter ID requirements, multi-language ballots, etc! Hopefully, this makes everyone voting experience easy and stress free!

States with Same-Day Voter Registration

  • Colorado
  • Connecticut
  • District of Columbia
  • Idaho
  • Iowa
  • Maine
  • Minnesota
  • Montana
  • New Hampshire
  • Wisconsin
  • Wyoming

States with Vote-By-Mail Only

  • Colorado (can drop off at designated sites on Election Day)
  • Oregon (can drop off at designated sites on Election Day)
  • Washington (must be postmarked by Election Day)

States with Voter Photo ID Laws (varies from state to state)

  • Alabama
  • Arkansas
  • Florida
  • Georgia
  • Hawaii
  • Idaho
  • Indiana
  • Kansas
  • Mississippi
  • New Hampshire
  • South Carolina
  • Tennessee
  • Texas

States with Multi-Lingual Ballots or Language Assistance

  • Alaska
  • Arizona
  • California
  • Colorado
  • Connecticut
  • Florida
  • Hawaii
  • Idaho
  • Illinois
  • Kansas
  • Louisiana
  • Maryland
  • Massachusetts
  • Michigan
  • Mississippi
  • Montana
  • Nebraska
  • Nevada
  • New Jersey
  • New Mexico
  • New York
  • North Dakota
  • Oklahoma
  • Oregon
  • Pennsylvania
  • Rhode Island
  • South Dakota
  • Texas
  • Utah
  • Washington

Rock The Vote has some great resources here about election requirements in your home state.