sam-ashley

Who you should fight: Critical Role cast

Matthew Mercer: you can fight Matthew Mercer. The man is incredibly intelligent but he’s not especially buff. He might surprise you though, lanky people can be wily fighters. It would be an interesting fight regardless of who won or lost. He’d probably thank you for being a fan and help you to your feet if he defeated you. You can fight Matthew Mercer. 

Marisha Ray: Do not fight Marisha Ray! Not only does she know actual marital arts, she used to be part of something called Fight Club where they used melee weapons. Dangerous with her fists or weapons. Do not fight Marisha Ray. (Also if you fight Marisha Ray I will find you and then *I* will fight you because she has enough jackasses being rude to her, and that needs to stop.)

Liam O’Brien: first you would have to catch him. The man runs 10 miles every day for fun so … good fucking luck. Even if you do catch him why would you want to fight him oh my god leave Liam O’Brien alone! (Also if you did fight him, you’d then have to defeat the combined rage of Sam, Laura, me, and half the fanbase charging to his defense.) You can fight Liam O’Brien but at what cost

Taliesin Jaffe: you can fight Taliesin Jaffe. You shouldn’t, but you can. He has the power of Luck Manipulation granted to him by mysterious dark forces. Before you can blink, he’ll have defeated you, probably using something obscure from history. You can fight Taliesin Jaffe, but he’s going to win. 

Laura Bailey: you can fight Laura Bailey but you will lose. Either she’ll take you out at the knees right away, or she’ll wink at you and you’ll fight yourself for her honor. Have you seen Laura Bailey she’s so cool and charming and amazing. You can fight Laura Bailey but you’ll lose. And you’ll deserve to lose, because how dare you.

Sam Riegel: you should absolutely fight Sam Riegel. Anytime, anywhere. Fight him in a Denny’s Parking lot, a grocery store, an arena. Fight this man. Win, lose, who cares? You must fight him

Travis Willingham: you can fight Travis Willingham. If you’re buff he’ll fight you fair. If you’re smol and fierce he might be a little flustered. If you’re weak he’ll probably let you get in one hit before putting his hand on your forehead and keeping you at arm’s length until you wear yourself out. But he’d be nice about it. You can fight Travis Willingham. (Please note if you hurt him, you’ll have to answer to Laura Bailey, and that will not end well … for you.)

Brian Foster: you can fight Brian Foster. I’m pretty sure you’d win too. He self-deprecates so much, he might fight and defeat himself before you could even get to him. You can fight Brian Foster. (But like, maybe you shouldn’t. He beats himself up on the internet enough as it is.) 

Ashley Johnson: no. How dare you even think about fighting Ashley Johnson. Go sit in the corner and think about what you’ve done. 

youtube

Amazing scene from episode 89.

Context: Upon finding out that Taryon hasn’t bothered to learn the names of most of his new traveling companions, Pike recruits Tary’s mechanical assistant Doty to immediately sketch some portraits. Of course, Doty takes the request very literally and decides to sketch everyone while they’re in bed. Many of them are not in bed alone.

The Performative Wokeness of Dear White People

“I plan to marry me a dark-skinned sister. Have the ashiest, blackest babies possible.” Says the character of Reggie (Marques Richardson) to his group of friends as they’re taking a stroll on the campus of Winchester University, the fictional university set in the world of Dear White People. Reggie’s proclamation came during a conversation about the character of Sam’s (Logan Browning) new white boyfriend.

The statement echoes a conversation that Sam has earlier in the series with her group of friends where she says that she prefers her men like she prefers her coffee “full-bodied with preferably Keyan origins.” Prompting Muffy (Caitlin Carver) to ask Sam, in Muffy’s words, “a dumb white girl question,” why it would be racist if Muffy was to only date white men, but not racist for Sam to only date black men. Sam goes onto explain that there are parts of her identity that white men will never understand in the ways a black man could. However, Sam does eventually start dating a white guy named Gabe (John Patrick Amedori), who only after being outed on his Instagram account, does she go public with.

Sam’s relationship with a white man becomes a point of contention for many of her closest friends, sparking an ongoing discussion in the series of whether a black person can really be pro-black, while also having a white significant other.

Reggie’s politics, however, are never challenged in the same ways that Sam’s are. His declaration of love for dark-skinned women, is dead upon arrival considering that the only other thing that he is known for outside of his pro-blackness, is his crush on Sam. A light-skinned biracial woman.

Based on the 2014 movie of the same name, Dear White People is a satire set at a PWI about college campus politics through the lens of black students. The show also explores the theme of identity. How often people assume identities or have identities projected onto them that contradicts who they really are. Identities such as being“woke.”

Used to describe a person who is socially and politically conscious, the word “woke” has surged in popularity within recent years due to social media and the rise of social movements such as Black Lives Matter. But what once was a way to describe someone’s political awareness, being, or staying woke, has seemingly dissolved more into a competition of who is more educated on race and other social issues.

Performative wokeness is examined within the world of Dear White People, with episode five featuring a scene where Reggie shows off an app he created called Woke or Not. The app shows photos of students at Winchester University and with a push of a button app users can determine whether a person is woke. Or not.

Even though Dear White People pokes fun at the absurdity and arrogance that comes from people who think they have the moral authority to decide who is or isn’t woke, the show itself falls into many of the same traps that it attempts to satirize.

In an episode centered around Gabe, he’s sitting at a table surrounded by Sam and other black women while they discuss white male privilege and how women of color are often passed over for opportunities that usually end up being given to mediocre white men. While he’s silently listening on, Gabe imagines himself banging his fist against the table as he looks directly into the camera and exclaims that sometimes people actually earn the things they get and that just because he’s a white man doesn’t make him an “asshole.”

“Asshole,” of course, seems just a tad bit reductive considering that being an “asshole” in this scenario is about benefiting from a society that prioritizes average white men over hard working black women. While the narrator says that only “a tiny part” of Gabe wishes he could make such a statement, it’s still concerning that Gabe, who is supposedly enlightened on issues of racism and sexism, is secretly harboring resentment against women of color for venting their frustrations about the institutions that systematically hold them back from opportunities

Is it possible that Gabe is being used as a conduit to discuss liberal racism? After all, episode five deals with how even “good” white people can be guilty of the same racism that they like to think they’re above. But this wasn’t Gabe’s first time making racially tone deaf statements without being taken to task. In the first episode, Gabe tells Sam that he wouldn’t let his friends make her feel like she didn’t belong in his “world,” after Gabe’s first uncomfortable meeting with Sam’s friends where he made a series of half-hearted attempts at trying to relate to the struggles of black students.  

 However, the most egregious occurrence of Dear White People’s lack of self awareness about their own performative wokeness comes with their handling of discussions surrounding colorism.  

The most improved upon element from Dear White People the movie is the colorism. In the movie, the character of Coco (Teyonah Parris,) a dark-skinned black woman, existed solely as a foil to Tessa Thompson’s version of Sam, a light-skinned biracial woman. With the movie being turned into a series, we see Coco, now played by Antoinette Robertson, develop into a fleshed out, fully realized character. But even with the series upgrading on the movie’s shortcomings, even going as far as calling Sam out on her light-skin privilege, the series began developing flaws of their own in regards to its colorism.

Joelle (Ashley Blaine Featherson) outside of being Sam’s best friend, also has feelings for Reggie, the guy who has feelings for Sam. This scenario is reminiscent to a flashback scene in episode four in which Coco longingly looks on as Troy, (Brandon Bell) a guy she has feelings for, flirt with Sam. Even though in that particular situation, the scene was a part of an episode that explores Coco’s relationship to colorism and how it affects her love life, the same motivation doesn’t appear to be behind the love triangle of Sam, Joelle, and Reggie.

The fact that the only light-skinned biracial woman of the show is constantly shown as the object of affection, while the two principle dark-skinned women of the show are depicted as coveting over color struck black men who constantly overlook them for said light-skinned biracial woman is disheartening to watch.

What makes this even more disheartening, is the fact that Joelle was walking right beside Reggie, struggling to contain her smile, as he declared that he was going to “marry him a dark-skinned sister,” only later to hook up with Sam. But Joelle, nor does anyone else, call him out about how his preference doesn’t align with who we actually see him dating.

Has Dear White People found itself stuck in the same tiny confines of identity that it sought out to expose through its characters? Can the contradictions that arise within the show merely be chalked up to poor writing? Or does it prove that inconsistency will inevitably happen when trying to voice the concerns of multiple people with varying opinions? A light skin woman can not speak to the struggles of colorism that a dark skin woman faces. A white man can’t relate to the problems a black man has. And one show cannot voice the opinions of all within a community.

AU where Until Dawn is an award winning movie and all the characters are actors in it. Just imagine.

  • Josh and Chris aren’t allowed to do interviews alone together for reasons that no one is allowed to say
  • Sam constantly brings the cast and crew coffee and hot chocolate every time they shoot in the snow
  • Bloopers of Mike constantly falling on his face as he’s doing his “heroic” run to save Jessica
  • Jess in the background laughing at him every time he falls on his face
  • “Fuck nuggets”, “Scared the blue out of my jeans”, “Jesus hot sauce Christmas cake”, and everyone other creative curse was completely improvised by Mike
  • Emily accidentally hitting Ashley while filming the slap-scene and Emily freaking out and apologizing
  • Theres a tabloid rumor that Mike and Matt hate each other and got into a fist fight on set, when really they just had a heated argument over who gets the last donut (Josh stole it while they fought)
  • Josh and Jess constantly forgetting their lines
  • Ashley going out of her way to meet fans and sign pictures for them
  • Mike taking every sexist question that Jess gets during interviews
  • Chris doing the same for Ashley and Josh doing the same for Sam
  • Matt not needing to do that, because Emily can handle the situation on her own
  • Matt visiting sick fans in the hospital
  • Hannah and Beth being famous twin actors, and the marketing purposefully misdirected it so it looked like Beth and Hannah were the leads to make their “deaths” more shocking
  • Josh and Hannah staying in their “villain” makeup (ie the psycho mask and wendigo makeup) and hiding in people’s trailers to scare them
  • Matt and Jess, during their first interview together, ended it with Jess beatboxing and Matt freestyle rapping. It becomes the most liked video on youtube
  • Emily being the queen of dubsmash, and it spreading to the whole cast constantly doing them inbetween shots
  • The guys having paintball games in between scenes and Ashley and Sam joining in only to destroy them
  • There’s several bloopers of Josh and Chris leaning forward about to kiss only to start laughing
  • “what were all thinking it” is Josh’s reasoning for ruining so many shots
  • Interviewer: “Who was your favorite member to shoot with?” Beth: “My sister of course. She’s my best friend and I wouldn’t want to do this without her”. Hannah: “Awww… mine was Mike”
  • Interviewer: “What was your favorite scene to shoot?”. Ashley“The Saw scene since it was so intense and and special effects were so amazing that it looked so real”. Chris“When i got to kiss Ashley” *Smirks*
  • Sam confirming the fan theory that her character is gay
  • Interviewer“Which fate would you want, death or wendigo?” Josh“how about a happy ending for my character instead”
Highlights from Talks Machina (Episode 99)
  • New set!
  • Jon Heder’s coming back next week!
  • Sam had no plan B if the Fate die hadn’t worked out.
  • Sam thinks of it as poor planning on his part that Taryon didn’t talk to Vex ahead of time about thinking of leaving.
  • Ashley thinks it’s funny that people consider Pike to be the mom friend of the group. She thinks of Pike as “the little weirdo of the group”, but watching back bits and pieces, she can sort of see where people are getting it. Laura points out that the party all winds up tattling on each other to her in the process of getting her caught up.
  • Everyone is Sam:


  • Sam was surprised by everyone’s reactions - everyone was super happy and excited during the break, and then things shifted once they got back into character.
  • Ashley was surprised at how mad Pike was. She found herself trying to be nice but couldn’t, and realized Grog was in the same boat. Laura, on the other hand, thought Vex was gonna be more angry. Vex is also in the mode of “be really pleasant and say all the right things so he doesn’t go away again”.
  • Vex’s check noticed that his shadow was smaller.
  • Sam didn’t know this was going to happen when it did; Matt managed the timing, although they’d worked out some possible details beforehand. Jon Heder was legitimately never supposed to say “The Meat Man”, which gave the game away too soon, but it worked out perfectly for his character.
  • Scanlan disguised himself as a defense mechanism.
  • If they hadn’t recognized Scanlan, he wouldn’t have come back after delivering that info—that was their one shot.
  • A theory is floated that this was all a way for Sam to get twice as much fanart as everyone else. “Yes. No, it’s super dickish, I’m sorry.” Sam resolves to stop being the surprise guy in the next campaign.
  • Everyone tries to get Laura to spill the beans on what Vex was being mysterious about, but she refuses.
  • Travis refused to come on the show to talk about it this week; he’ll talk about it later, but not yet.
  • Laura isn’t sure yet whether Vex is gonna pull out the hat again.
  • Laura is very amused that Vax didn’t catch on to Vex having a secret. Sam: “Do you think he was being deliberately obtuse?” Laura: “No, I think it’s like Larkin.” If he’d pushed, she probably would’ve explained.
  • Pike mostly punched Lionel because Grog wouldn’t walk away from a fight, and she could tell how hurt he was.
  • Re: episode 100: “be there on time.”

Talks Machina: Dark Edition (with more lights than before)

  • Sam wins the roll for hosting and has some trouble adjusting. “What am I looking at? There’s just a teleprompter with a light flashing next to the word ‘Brian’.” “Skipping all of the good questions and just going to the weird ones…” “To Liam… oh, he’s not here.”
  • Asked why he decided to bring Scanlan down a darker path: “Scanlan started dying and it started messing with his head.”
  • Vex currently has zero gold.
  • Everyone reminisces about how they met Taliesin and how nice he is.
  • Advice to give themselves if they could go back to episode one. Ashley: “I would tell myself to not get a job so I could keep playing the game.”
  • Sam has two apps on his phone that make t-shirts instantly. The last shirt was made while showing Matt how the app worked.
youtube

Ep 100 - Slayer’s Cake Commercial

youtube

Ep 100 - Scanlan apologises to Pike and Grog

vimeo

Pike is a Good Teacher.