salon walls

the art of the salon wall
five tips for creating a gorgeous gallery space at home.

a salon wall is our celebrated way to display a highly personal, visually interesting mix of art and pieces that suddenly become art once cleverly arranged in a creative montage. want to create your own? our visuals manager and resident salon wall expert, ashley parsons, leads the way:


amidst the jumble, find harmony.

balance warm and cool colors; visually heavy and visually light pieces; and graphic, painterly and photographic pieces so that, as a whole, it’s easy on the eyes. (arranging pieces on the floor first will help you find the big picture—and avoid errant holes in your walls.) and if you’re using pieces with words, don’t group them together: “they’ll feel less special if you do,” says ashley.


consistency counts.

frames should fit the same profile: similar, but not exactly the same. “the charm of a salon wall is visual cohesion that’s still eclectic and fun,” says ashley. try using all the same color, or different colors in the same width. (we love a mix of black, white and brass.)

or, she advises, “use the frames to pick up complimentary colors in other pieces.” and if it’s a specific color you’re after, buy raw wood frames and spray paint them any which way you like.


pay attention to spacing.

your images should stay relatively clustered, and watch out for rogue gaps. if you’re working with a little art and a lot of wall, identify a small space to group them together rather than spreading them out.


tell a story.

while it’s not essential to a visually appealing salon wall, a theme or thread that runs through your images makes it personal—“even if your theme is ‘these are things that I love,’” says ashley. “it should make sense to you.” if you really want a cohesive statement, try using a series of portraits or illustrations.

shop home decor here. for more tips on decorating, entertaining and living an even more interesting life, pick up a copy of our new book, all in good taste.

anonymous asked:

Imagine Steve getting his first modern haircut in the 21st century.

Nat swears by this place, and Steve can almost understand why. It’s a little hole in the wall salon, toeing the line between chic and pretentious. The chairs are worn but plush, the art doesn’t make any sense but still has the air of inspiration, and everyone who works there is very funny but Steve is starting to wonder if they were all also trained in the red room because he swears Nat quirks her eyebrows just like that when she makes a terrible pun.  

 It’s just that when Steve pictures getting a haircut, this is so far from what comes to mind. When he was growing up, every barber shop on the block was light years out of his price range. Like many of the neighborhood kids, Steve walked around sporting the best bowl cut his mother could manage. If you weren’t satisfied by that, you learned how to deal with it. At that point, Steve had more pressing concerns that what was lying on his head. 

After the serum, it was all Army barbers and razors from there on out. Right up until Natasha got a glint of mischief in her eye and asked why he never changed his look.

“So what do you think, Stars and Stripes?” The hairdresser who just finished the last of his touchups asks, removing the black and silver smock from around Steve’s torso. “Everything you hoped it would be?” 

Steve had very little investment in the direction his hair was going, so he had turned the reins over to Nat when he was first asked what he was looking for in a style. In retrospect, this was probably an incredible act of trust and friendship, but Steve knew in his gut that she had forgotten more about good taste that he would ever know. He caught the reflection of her satisfied smile in the mirror as Steve surveyed the damage.

It was sticking up in a way that seemed to defy the basic laws of gravity. His normally golden hair was highlighted and streaked, with a splash of blue over his bangs that perfectly matched his eyes. He had seen this kind of look before in countless billboards and movies but to see it move on his own head, that was something else.

Steve grinned into the mirror. “I love it.”

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so please accept this money making alternatives for the agents of shield team:

  • Triplett and Mack’s Lawn Mowing Service
  • Skye’s IT Service
  • Lance Hunter’s Escort Service (not that kind, the friend kind, but also that kind)
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  • May’s Self Defense Studio
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  • Grant Ward Italian Tutor
  • Jemma Simmons Life Counselor
  • Antoine Triplett’s Facial Hair Salon
  • Phil Coulson’s Patterned Wall Designs Company
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ever wondered how to create the perfect salon wall? we’ve created 12 limited edition prints for you to do just that! (we love how @brightonkeller mixed her prints with extra elements) head to our facebook page to find out how to purchase!

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