salmonids

When a “trout” is not a trout.

The common names used for fishes sometimes have little to do with how they are classified biologically.

Bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) are members of the “trout” family, Salmonidae, as are salmon, grayling, and whitefish. However, technically speaking, bull trout are actually classified as char (Genus: Salvelinus).

One general difference between trout and char is that trout have light colored bodies with dark spots and char have dark-colored bodies with light spots.

Since 1997, our USFWS Montana Fish and Wildlife Conservation Office continues to work cooperatively with the Blackfeet Tribe, Glacier National Park, and the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation to focus on gathering important information on the status and biology of the federally threatened St. Mary River Bull Trout population in north-west Montana.

Photo Credit: Jim Mogen / USFWS

(via: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Mountain-Prairie Region)

WIDESPREAD DEAFNESS IN FARMED SALMON: HALF OF THEM HAVE HEARING LOSS DUE TO DEFORMED EAR BONES

The rapid growth of aquaculture raises questions about the welfare status of mass-produced species. Salmon have otoliths (ear bones) made from aragonite, a crystal form of calcium carbonate. These are the main hearing structures in the inner ear. However, individuals can possess a deformity in which the aragonite structure is replaced with another crystal form of calcium carbonate, vaterite.

Australian researchers studied this otolith defect in wild and farmed Atlantic salmon in Norway, as well as farmed fish from Australia, Scotland, Canada and Chile. Farmed fish were 10x more likely to have the otolith deformity than wild fish. Further, average levels of vaterite replacement have a major physiological effect on individuals: a 28–50% loss in hearing sensitivity.

The underlying causes of vaterite formation remain unknown, but the prevalence of hearing impairment in farmed fish has important implications for animal welfare, the survival of escapees and their effects on wild populations, and the efficacy of restocking programs based on captive-bred fish.

There is a fundamental reason why we look at the sky with wonder and longing—for the same reason that we stand, hour after hour, gazing at the distant swell of the open ocean. There is something like an ancient wisdom, encoded and tucked away in our DNA, that knows its point of origin as surely as a salmonid knows its creek. Intellectually, we may not want to return there, but the genes know, and long for their origins—their home in the salty depths. But if the seas are our immediate source, the penultimate source is certainly the heavens…The spectacular truth is—and this is something that your DNA has known all along—the very atoms of your body—the iron, calcium, phosphorus, carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, and on and on—were initially forged in long-dead stars. This is why, when you stand outside under a moonless, country sky, you feel some ineffable tugging at your innards. We are star stuff. Keep looking up.
—  Jerry Waxman

Wrangell-St. Elias National Park & Preserve - Alaska:

Our salmon counts in the Copper River are outstanding this year!

As of yesterday, July 5, records show a return of 1,049,769 fish, more than twice the estimated return of 520,000 predicted for this date. A reason our fish are coming back in record numbers has to do with the natural life cycle of salmon: four to five years ago was also a good season, and the salmon spawned from that year are now returning after maturing in the sea.  (LSN)

reuters.com
Thousands of salmon die in hotter-than-usual Northwest rivers
Unseasonably hot water has killed nearly half of the sockeye salmon migrating up the Columbia River through Oregon and Washington state, a wildlife official said on Monday.

Only 272,000 out of the more than 507,000 sockeye salmon that have swum between two dams along a stretch of the lower Columbia River have survived the journey, said Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife fisheries manager John North.

“We’ve never had mortalities at this scale,” said North… 

Tide’s turning, it’s National Estuaries Week! Estuaries are locations where rivers meet the sea. Serving as natural runoff filters and nurseries for hundreds of young fish and other species, estuaries are important, productive habitats for humans and wildlife alike. On the coast of Greater Farallones National Marine Sanctuary, the Gualala River estuary pictured here provides an important habitat for young salmonid fish. 

Learn more about estuaries and Estuary Week events near you. 

(Photo: NOAA)

Take a look at this monster Taimen! This fish from Selenga in Mongolia came from Ingol Travel agency who has over 20 years fishing for the worlds largest salmonid. Here is their website: www.ingol.cz/en/travel-agency-Ingol-specialist-in-Mongolia.aspx
#flyfishing #mongolia #taimen #monsterfish #bigfish #fishing #hogjohnson #worldrecord #howbig
#rivermonster #rivermonsters

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There is a fundamental reason why we look at the sky with wonder and longing—for the same reason that we stand, hour after hour, gazing at the distant swell of the open ocean.

There is something like an ancient wisdom, encoded and tucked away in our DNA, that knows its point of origin as surely as a salmonid knows its creek. Intellectually, we may not want to return there, but the genes know, and long for their origins—their home in the salty depths.

But if the seas are our immediate source, the penultimate source is certainly the heavens… The spectacular truth is—and this is something that your DNA has known all along—the very atoms of your body—the iron, calcium, phosphorus, carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, and on and on—were initially forged in long-dead stars.

This is why, when you stand outside under a moonless, country sky, you feel some ineffable tugging at your innards. We are star stuff. Keep looking up…

Restoring the Grayling

The magnificent Arctic Grayling (Thymallus arcticus) was once native to many streams in Michigan. They were extirpated by the 1930s due to past logging practices, overfishing and introduction of other salmonids into the Great Lakes basin. Unfortunately, past attempts to reintroduce Grayling by the State of Michigan have been successful.

Find out more:
https://www.fws.gov/mountain-prairie/species/fish/grayling/grayling.htm

Photograph by USFWS/Mark Conlin

(via: Ashland Fish and Wildlife Conservation Office)