saint panteleimon

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Pantalaimon: Derived from the Greek elements παν (pan) meaning “all” and ελεημων (eleemon) meaning “compassionate” (i.e. “mercy for everyone”). Alternatively from παντελεία (panteleya), meaning “perfection.” Saint Pantaleon (also called Panteleimon), a doctor from Asia Minor, is a patron saint of doctors and midwives.

Stelmaria: From Latin Stella Maris, another name for Polaris, the North or Pole Star. Stella Maris was, from an early time, also used as a title of the Blessed Virgin Mary, Our Lady, Star of the Sea, in her capacity as a guide and protector of those who travel or seek their livelihoods on the ocean. 

Anfang: German. “start, beginning, origin.” From Middle High German anvanc, anevanc, from Old High German anafang, Old Saxon “clutch, embrace.”

Salcilia: From Latin salsus, “salty” (both literally, and in the sense of witty or funny) and also a verb meaning “preserve with salt; sprinkle salt before a sacrifice.” The -cilia could be from Latin -cil (āre), combining form of calāre, “to summon, convoke.” This servant-boy’s name could therefore figuratively mean “to call for the salt.”

Sophonax: From Greek elements σοφία (sophia) “wisdom” & αναξ (anax) “master, lord.” (Possibly influenced by spelling of Greek σωφρων (sophron) “self-controlled, sensible.”)

Belisaria: Fem. form of Belisarius, the Latinized form of Greek Βελισάριος (Belisarios), possibly from Slavonic Beli-tzar “white prince” (the -sarius element being interpreted as coming from the old Slavic word tsesar or tsesari, which was derived from Caesar, thus giving Belisarius a “princely” connotation). This was the name of a famed Byzantine general and war hero.