russian print

10

Found a bunch of new posters with Soviet republics emblems and patterns. And a bonus double-sided poster with the Russian alphabet. I don’t think I can find second copies of these, so first come first serve! Published in 1988.
(Sorry for the bad photos, we get aweful daylight these days with all the rains)

See all posters on Etsy: https://www.etsy.com/shop/SovietPostcards?section_id=19367225

hey spanish / july 2016 / Karolina Koryl

The Rise of the Russian Avant-Garde

A Revolutionary Impulse: The Rise of the Russian Avant-Garde opens this Saturday, December 3. The exhibition brings together 260 major works from MoMA’s collection, tracing the period of artistic innovation between 1912 and 1935. Planned in anticipation of the centennial year of the 1917 Russian Revolution, the exhibition highlights breakthrough developments in the conception of Suprematism and Constructivism, as well as in avant-garde poetry, theater, photography, and film, by such figures as Alexandra Exter, Natalia Goncharova, El Lissitzky, Kazimir Malevich, Vladimir Mayakovsky, Lyubov Popova, Alexandr Rodchenko, Olga Rozanova, Vladimir and Georgii Stenberg, and Dziga Vertov, among others.

[Gustav Klutsis. Memorial to Fallen Leaders. 1927. Cover with lithographed photomontage illustrations on front and back. The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Gift of The Judith Rothschild Foundation. © 2016 / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York]

  • them: hey we need you to skim and catalogue some russian-language magazines
  • me: sure без проблем
  • them: cool. just so you know, they're pre-1918
  • me: о нѣтъ
Ok since the whole tumblr is obsessed with Yuri!!! on Ice

I decided to give some advices especially to the artists who draw russian characters to make it less cringy for myself. I’m sure somebody might have already done something like this but I still want to bring up some points.


- to all shippers out there: russians wear wedding rings on the RIGHT HAND, not on the left;

- we also don’t have a tradition of the engagement rings;

- please, please, PLEASE don’t try to write/use russian phrases unless you actually know the language or can ask someone who knows it. Non-speakers won’t get them, latin transliteration is ugly as fuck, not to mention that the translator will 99.9% get it wrong somewhere. Use english, really;

- the same goes to writing in russian: please don’t do it unless you know how to. Redrawing russian printed letters looks weird at best. Russian cursive is a bitch but at least it’s a beautiful bitch;

- russians don’t celebrate Christmas on the December 25th. Orthodox Christmas is celebrated on the 7th of January and it’s not as global as western Christmas. It’s more of a religious tradition. But New Year celebration in Russia is HUGE. So if you want to draw a winter thematic art, new year theme would suit better;

- (also we don’t have Halloween);

- according to the rules of transliteration it’s ‘Viktor’. Not ‘Victor’;

- when drawing scenes of russian character with people they’re close to, use their short name forms. Especially with lovers. (So yeah use ‘Vitya’ and ‘Yura’ it’s really nice);

- there are more forms of russian names: some are tender, some are playful, some are cute, some even are weird. If you want to know a specific form just ask someone who’s native. But common short forms work almost always;

- there’s a difference between ‘nickname’ and 'short form of a name’. Russian names are very inclusive - all short forms of our name are also used as our name. Not in the official documents obviously but everywhere else. Like friends would never call each other by their full form names unless it’s a joke or 'their thing’;

- but things are different when it comes to a social hierarchy: for example a mentor can (and in most cases will) call their student by common short form of their name but student has to call their mentor by their full form and also add their 'otchestvo’ (father’s name, not the same as a second name), unless there is little or no age difference between them;

- this is more like a subjective opinion from me but being called by a full name by a close person (family/friend/lover) is somewhat mentally tiring for a russian. I mean it’s not like short form is an optional nickname that is used in specific situations by specific people. It’s a name that russian person hears for the most time. Being called by an 'official’ form all the time is quite exhausting. But maybe it’s just me;

- also this is totally off-topic but Yuri freaking out because there is another Yuuri with a name that is similar to his is so ridiculous. I mean russian names are common. Just while my school times I’ve met about 6 girls whose name was also 'Tatyana’. We didn’t shout at each other in the toilet.

Ok I think that’s it for now. Though I might have forgot something. Hm.
Somebody will probably disagree with me or will think that’s not important but I don’t care. It was worth a try.

Yeah, of course all of the above aren’t obligations but if you actually took them into consideration it would be really nice.

P.S. I also wrote one more piece of info.

If you’re ever worried about learning a new writing system for a language, just know that my high school taught Russian to a bunch of English-native 14-year-olds who didn’t know a single word in Russian, and within months we ended up accidentally writing English words with Russian letters and reading English words as if the letters were Russian.